Coast Guard Deployment

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by theGOAT, Feb 4, 2016.

  1. theGOAT

    theGOAT New Member

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    Just trying to get an idea of how long a deployment is in the Coast Guard, how much time do you get off between them, and what life as an actual Coast Guard officer is like. Also, can officers be in Coast Guard special forces??
     
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    The Coast Guard doesn't have special forces (technically, the Army has Special Forces, so you're likely referring to special operations).

    And before anyone says the MSRT or MSSTs are like special operations units…. they're not.
     
  3. trackandfield08

    trackandfield08 USCGA 2014

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    The length of a deployment depends on the class of the cutter you're on. I'm stationed on a 270' Medium Endurance Cutter and our typical patrol schedule is anywhere from 60-75 days underway and then 6-8 weeks inport on a rotating basis. So, in my two years onboard, I will have completed 6 ~2 month patrols. Larger cutters, such as a National Security Cutter or a Ice Breaker, will go out for longer period of times and then stay inport for longer periods. My best friend is stationed on HEALY and she has only been on two patrols. The first patrol she met her cutter in Alaska in July and then returned to Seattle in October and then the second, they left in June and she got back in late October/early November. Basically, as a JO on your first tour on a cutter, expect to be underway for about 1 year out of 2 years unless you're in dry dock or on a small platform. I couldn't tell you the estimated patrol days of a Fast Response Cutter or 110'.

    By the way, this is only speaking based off my experience on a white hull cutter. I'm not as familiar with black hull cutters (or buoy tenders) but maybe STN can help out here. He's the Operations Officer on one right now.

    In terms of "time off," there is still a working period while you're inport. My cutter gives the crew off the first week after a patrol and last week before a patrol with the terms that they come in and check their email at least once every 72 hours. The rest of the inport, the official working hours are 0645 to 1300 (1 PM) but hours depend on the work getting done, contractors, maintenance, etc.

    Can you be a little more specific on life as a Coast Guard officer? What would you like to learn more about?
     
  4. Freda'sMom

    Freda'sMom Parent

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    The Coast Guard disagrees with you.

    So does this web site: http://www.americanspecialops.com/coast-guard/msrt/

    And this one: http://www.refactortactical.com/blog/coast-guard-special-operations

    And this one: http://www.military.com/military-fi...u-s-coast-guard-deployable-specialized-forces

    What do you know that they don't? Seems they fit the exact definition.

    Special forces and special operations forces are military units trained to perform unconventional missions.
     
  5. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Haha, they're not even close! And nothing in that quote says "special operations" or "special forces." So….. yes, the Coast Guard does agree with me.

    What do I know? Well, for one I've covered them. I've worked with them. And I've had shipmates in both the MSRT and the MSSTs. They're not special operations.

    Oh and as far as what the Coast Guard thinks is special operations, I have a special operations ribbon and it's nothing to write home about.

    Of course, if you'd like, I could ask my buddy who is a Navy SEAL....


    I mean honestly, you think CG folks who were around for the DOG don't know about this stuff? It's an absolute joke. They're tried to ditch some of the MSSTs and even have them doing stuff a PSU would typically do. PSUs are typically Reserve units, and I'd guess are more "cost effective" than an MSST.


    So yes, I stand by that.... And I'll just have to disagree with those third party websites.

    And you understand that Special Forces is a community within the Army (and that, say, the SEALs are not "Special Forces"). I won't even try to explain "Special Operations" or U.S. Special Operations Command.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2016
    goforspaatz likes this.

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