College Major

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by luke_715, Jun 7, 2016.

  1. luke_715

    luke_715 Member

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    I'm in the process of applying to USNA right now, but I want to do NROTC at a university if I'm not accepted into the academy. Either way, I plan to go into aviation and was wondering what I need to major in. Would physics be a good option? Also, am I able to get laser eye surgery for aviation (regardless of who pays for it, myself or the Navy)? Thanks!
     
  2. bucketheadsdad

    bucketheadsdad Member

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    From everything I've run across, you do NOT want to get Lasik surgery done prior to becoming a member of USNA or NROTC.
     
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    .... and then only get it done with the Navy's permission.

    To become a Naval aviator you should major in ...... whatever turns you on. Physics is good but Naval Aviators include folks from all walks and majors.
     
  4. luke_715

    luke_715 Member

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    I know at USNA, Midshipmen get laser eye surgery for free but I seen somewhere that you can get it after your commission from NROTC but I don't know.
     
  5. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    Being an engineer will give you the most options. For a NROTC scholarship there are 3 tiers of majors. 85% of the scholarships go to tier 1 & 2 majors with are STEM majors. From the NROTC website http://www.nrotc.navy.mil/scholarship_criteria.html
    "The Navy is preparing our officer corps of the future to meet the dynamic challenges in the next generation of technology and leadership. In structuring our academic programs to meet these challenges, undergraduate academic majors for NROTC Navy option midshipmen are divided into three categories or tiers: Tier 1 - engineering programs of Navy interest, Tier 2 - other engineering, math and science programs, Tier 3 - Foreign language and remaining academic programs. In order to keep pace in this high tech and diverse environment, approximately 85% of Navy Option NROTC scholarships offers will be awarded to students interested in completing a Tier 1 or Tier 2 academic major. The NROTC scholarship provides full tuition and fees at 159 of our nation's most elite and prestigious colleges and universities."

    It is possible to get Lasik surgery while at USNA or in NROTC. For NROTC you need authorization and it will be on your own dime. But you want to get it done while you are in the program, not before. You want to wait until your eyes stop changing, so don't be in a rush.
     
  6. luke_715

    luke_715 Member

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    What about physics vs. engineering physics? Is one harder than the other? Is one more math based? I just came across the engineering physics major on the NROTC Application.
     
  7. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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    From Tulane University:

    Physics vs Engineering Physics

    Engineering (Engineering Physics) innovates. Science (Physics) discovers. Engineering is sometimes called applied science: it sits between science and technology. Science can be lofty. Engineering tends to be down to earth. Scientists experiment. Engineers invent things to help others. Scientists ponder. Engineers imagine. Both love to solve puzzles. Scientists like to understand how nature works. Engineers want to improve the world. Scientists write papers and books. Engineers make money. Scientists love to peek inside nature, seeking to delicately uncover new ways in which our universe works. Engineers are more interested in saving the world. While there is significant overlap, scientists and engineers approach things a little differently. They have somewhat different goals. Their professional standards differ a bit. They form different cultures.

    Both dream. In the last century new ideas came to market slowly. It often took a generation for novel concepts to become a part of every day life. Those nations that did this better became stronger economically, militarily and socially, than those nations that did not. It is difficult to imagine a nation that can compete effectively in the areas of communications, business, health, environment, energy, and security during the next century without strong science and technology. Those students who are well prepared for the next century are in the best position to become the leaders of the next generations.

    Our goal in the School of Science and Engineering at Tulane is to educate our students in both science and engineering to be quicker and better than students of the last century. We are trying to cut down the lag time between discovery and innovation. The way to drive innovation is to bring cutting edge science and the people who are doing design closer together. We believe that an interdisciplinary approach to science and engineering that enhances the depth of excellence of these fields gives our graduates an advantage over graduates of other, sometimes larger, universities who train their students more traditionally. In our unique department of physics and engineering physics, we offer two distinct majors – physics and engineering physics. One major is in science and the other in engineering. While the two curricula differ, a number of classes are the same so that our scientists and engineers come into daily contact and learn from one another.

    Source:
    http://www2.tulane.edu/sse/pep/academics/upload/engineering-physics-v-physics.pdf
     
  8. luke_715

    luke_715 Member

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    That was a lengthy but really good read. I'm deciding between the two majors (obviously) but I've never taken an engineering course. Any thoughts?
     
  9. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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    Unfortunately, I am a financial planner, not a physicist or an engineer. However, I AM a dad four times over, so here is what I would say to my kids:

    • If you like to tinker and fix things you might prefer engineering
    • If you prefer to do math problems versus work on your car, you might be more physics inclined.
    • If you were the type who dismantled your toys as a child to figure out how they worked, you might prefer engineering.
    • If you are fascinated by the design of a machine, you might prefer engineering.
    • If you prefer to understand the science behind the machine (thermodynamics, heat transfer, electrical theory) then you might prefer physics.
    • If you picture yourself working in the shop fabricating a solution, you might prefer engineering.
    • If you envision yourself doing the math behind the scenes, you might prefer physics.
    You get the idea?
     
  10. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    It seems a good point to give my usual snappy advice. What you major in has everything to do with the questions you will ask the rest of your life.
    For example, if you major in accounting you will ask "How much does it cost?". If you major in engineering, you will ask "How does it work?". And if you major in psychology, you will ask "Do you want fries with that?". :D
     
  11. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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    Kinnem, that is great wisdom and truth with an abundant dose of humor! :shake:
     
    kinnem likes this.

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