Color Blindness

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by Justanotherperson, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. Justanotherperson

    Justanotherperson New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I recently was offered an appointment for a spot in the Class of 2018 for the USCGA. However, they didn't review my medical exam yet and I found out that I am red/green color blind.

    Is there any chance of getting a medical waiver if I am red/green color blind?
    Is there anyone who got a waiver for red/green color blindness?

    I really want to go to the Coast Guard Academy, but now it seems hopeless.
     
  2. grevar

    grevar CGA Admissions Partner

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2013
    Messages:
    511
    Likes Received:
    96
    very sorry to hear that. While I am no expert on the subject, I am fairly certain that any colorblindness is not waiverable. You may want to contact Admissions and inquire. I know that USMA allows some forms of colorblindness, but I believe they are the only one. Again, not too sure about that.

    Best of luck to you. The fact that you did get a conditional appointment means you are probably a great kid and that you will be successful at whatever Plan B you may have if it comes to that.
     
  3. ckarve

    ckarve Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2013
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    2
    Please call/email Mr. William Anderson at the academy. He is in charge of medical waivers. Also contact your admissions officer and let them know.
    Mr. Anderson's email address is Anderson, William (EDU) <William.J.Anderson@uscga.edu>.
    Good Luck.
     
  4. Freda'sMom

    Freda'sMom Parent

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2011
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    143
    The FALANT test (the one with the red, white, and green lights) is the standard you must pass if you fail the PIP test (the hidden number plates).

    Very few locations can do it, and they may be far far away from you.

    If you are R/G color blind, the chance of waiver is zero.
     
  5. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    I've met a LTJG who has slight color blindness (had to go EOIT, couldn't do DWO because of it) but I didn't know what kind of color blindness it was. I know R/G is important though because buoys are red and green. Best of luck and sorry to hear that..
     
  6. BruceRTalbot

    BruceRTalbot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    I had an applicant that was not accepted at USCGA because of red/green color problems but was admitted to the Air Force Academy. Generally speaking, the sea services are stricter on color vision than the Army or Air Force.
     
  7. Justanotherperson

    Justanotherperson New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks. I emailed him and he informed me that I probably have to pass the FALANT test. If I end up not going to the CGA I guess I'll apply for the USAFA or USMA during my freshman year. I might consider doing ROTC.
     
  8. kpo

    kpo Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2014
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Justanotherperson: if you don't mind, please let us know how this ends up for you. DS wants to apply to USCGA, but has a similar issue. He cannot perceive many of the numbers on the Ishihara PIP color vision test. Frankly, he is not one of those people that is good at recognizing optical illusions, either, and I think it is part of the problem. He can distinguish red from green in all other aspects of life, and we are confident he could pass the FALANT test or OPTEC 900 if given the opportunity. Would love to hear from someone that actually went through the process....good luck!
     
  9. JMS

    JMS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    11
    KPO, and others, My DS went through this last year. There is a lot of info in color vision deficiencies on this board, just use the search function.
    After DS failed the PIP (out of the blue for us) we saw our eye Dr. (a very highly skilled Dr) where he failed the PIP again. Not even close. He can see plain colors but can not discern the pastels and blending that one confronts on the PIP. Because of all that I did a lot of reading regards the problem, the tests, and all related things. If it helps, you can blame the maternal grandfather as the source of the gene.
    I really hate being a bucket of cold water, but I do not want to soft soap it either for any of the readers. Last year, for the first time, USMMA decided to simply not consider candidates who could not pass the PIP. No alternate tests were considered. USCG and USNA continue to 'officially' hold out the option of offering the FALANT test (as noted by other posters). In my opinion, unless one is a pro-level athlete or has some other quality that is highly desired by the USCGA or USNA, one is not going to be offered the FALANT mas a means to get in. Sorry if that is too blunt, but they do not trot people through this alternate test routinely, and even if you find someone to give the test, I doubt they will give it serious consideration. I anticipate that in time the CG and Navy will follow the path of the USMMA.
    The FALANT (Farnsworth Lantern Test) is more forgiving. It was developed by a Navy Dr. Farnsworth back in the 50's, I recall, as a means to screen for color deficiency, while at the same time not unnecessarily excluding many applicants and draftees. The machine used to give the test has not been manufactured in 30 or 40 years and therefore increasing hard to find. Plus any creditable eye Dr. will report that the PIP is the gold std.
    Now, if those reading this can get their head around the color Green, the Army (and, I understand, the AF for non-pilots) are far less concerned with color vision. That is not to say "not interested", but accept applicants who can at least discern the colors on a traffic signal. Thus my DS is currently a Army ROTC cadet.
    My advice is, yes, hold out hope, but get busy on plan B and C. If Plan B and C include military service, get busy looking into the Army & AF.
     
  10. kpo

    kpo Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2014
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, JMS. DS is also applying for Army ROTC scholarship, so we are glad to hear that the color vision issue may not be as great an obstacle to him there.
     
  11. Justanotherperson

    Justanotherperson New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I took the FALANT Test and failed it. It was really hard for me to distinguish the colors of the lights. :cool: The petty officer I spoke with suggested that I should look into the Army, Air Force, or the Marine Corps. I'll be doing Army ROTC in UCI. There's a reason for everything, right? I look forward to Army ROTC.
     
  12. JMS

    JMS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    11
    Good for you! My DS is very happy with being 'green' and doing well. The color vision thing will be irrelevant to you. In the Army ROTC the parts of your status under your control will revolve around your GPA and your PT score.
     
  13. TrumpetTennis

    TrumpetTennis Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    0
    Speaking from experience: Life goes on, and it will all be ok.
     

Share This Page