Color Vision Defiency?

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Cadet Shakkori, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. Cadet Shakkori

    Cadet Shakkori Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    I took my medical exams last month. I passed on everything, but the optometrist did mention that I have a hard time seeing more intense shades of green and red. The Naval academy have said I am medically disqualified and my status is "Pending Waiver Submission/Review" What do I do? Will this disqualify me for the AROTC and NROTC scholarship? Wil it affect my West Point application?
     
  2. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    5
    The color vision standards at the sea services academies (Coast Guard, Navy, KP) are much more strict than the Army or Air Force standards.
     
  3. Grad/Dad

    Grad/Dad Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was DQ'd for the same thing more than 25 years ago. It is my understanding that USAFA and USNA will not waiver for this since a large majority of their graduates become pilots. West Point does waiver for this which is why I am a USMA grad. OBW, I also received Air Force, Marine Corps and Army ROTC scholarships. You will, however, never pass a flight physical in any of the services.
     
  4. JMS

    JMS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    11
    DS learned that he, too has a previously unknown color deficiency, and although to our estimation his is not very severe, he was DQed from all the sea service academies. We also learned that (new this year) KP will not allow alternative tests to waiver applicants. Thus DS hit the end of the road at KP.
    Navy and CG do allow an alternative test called the Farnsworth Lantern Test (FALANT) which, from what I have read, is somewhat more forgiving with regard to the lighter pastel reds and greens and does not seems to concern itself at all with rare blue deficiencies. Google it for more info, but in short it sounds like one simply names the colors of red, green and white lamps without the pastels and color mixing that occurs in the Ishihara (sp) (the test you likely took.) There may be other, similar tests, too. The FALANT was devised by Dr Farnsworth (a Navy Dr.) back in the 50's. I gather the hardware needed to give the test is no longer manufactured and working units have become more scarce. There are other, similar, tests which may be acceptable to the Navy & CG.
    What we have learned is that neither CG or Navy (and perhaps the Army and AF) will offer the alternative test for waiver purposes until the candidate is accepted, and then the acceptance will be conditioned upon passing this alternate test... not too much riding on this one test, right?
    Luigi, does the CGA have one of these FALANT machines on campus or does the academy ck/verify new cadet color vision during their first summer by some other means?
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,509
    Likes Received:
    459
    USNA rarely waives red/green b/c not only do pilots need this but surface and sub drivers do as well. However, USNA can waive up to 2% of each incoming class. I believe those individuals are required to sign something stating their understanding that they can only be commissioned in the USMC ground or in the restricted line/staff corps.

    I don't know how USNA handles other color issues.
     
  6. Cadet Shakkori

    Cadet Shakkori Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you all for the info! As USMA is my main choice, (and the one I have a nomination to) I am only a bit dissappointed. will this DQ me from the NROTC scholarship?
     
  7. MomofFutureLeader

    MomofFutureLeader Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    2
    Color Vision Deficiency

    I can only speak to our experience. DS was DQ'd by USNA for color vision deficency and did not recieve a waiver. While he was waiting to see how it would play out he received notification that he had been selected for a Navy ROTC scholarship, pending medical. About a month or so later he received a letter stating that the Navy ROTC scholarship was rescinded due to the color vision issue. All was fine in the end as USMA had already extended an offer after giving an LOA previously and he was principal nominee for USAFA and received an offer there as well as offer of Air Force ROTC scholarship. He is currently in his first year at USAFA. So, as you can see, for DS at least, the only one who had an issue with the color vision deficency was the Navy side of things. USMA and USAFA showed him as qualified right from the start. USAFA was first choice so all played out just fine.
     
  8. vareporter

    vareporter Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    My older son was not DQ'd from NROTC for severe color-blindness. He has it about as bad as one can have it. It will, however, severely restrict the jobs you can do. For example, husband was a Nuke. You most definitely CANNOT be a Nuke. You won't fly, etc. Even most special ops and intelligence jobs require color vision.
     
  9. navydad17

    navydad17 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2012
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cadet Shakkori,
    Hold on to a little hope..........Roger Staubach, Dallas Cowboys QB from 1969-1979 was color blind and graduated from the USNA!
     
  10. JMS

    JMS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    11
    In re-reading my post above, it occurs to me that I misused the term 'waiver.' What I understand happens is that if one passes the Farnsworth test they have passed/qualified. No waiver required. If one does not pass they one must get one of the apparently very uncommon waivers.
    Those concerned should keep in mind that color deficiency is not a 'black and white" issue. (pun intended). One falls on a range of color vision acuity, it is not all or nothing, but how 'vivid' ones perception of color is. True color 'blindness' is very rare.
    That said, those contemplating applying may wish to consider asking to be screened for color vision next time you are at your Eye Dr. It is not a routine screening I learned because the condition is rarely a problem in daily activities, and there is nothing to be done to cure it, but it is a quick thing. Knowing early on if this is an issue may serve to temper ones expectations well before one gets to the the point of a DODMERB physical.
     
  11. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    5
    Color perception deficiency - partial or total - is a disqualification for USCGA.

    However, candidates who fail the PIP test will be considered as "qualified" if they pass the FALANT test.
     

Share This Page