Competitive States

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by jlnglvn2033, Sep 13, 2016.

  1. jlnglvn2033

    jlnglvn2033 Banned

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    Does anyone know how competitive California is? I'm assuming every state is competitive, but some more then others, I'm sure. Or am I way off.
     
  2. time2

    time2 Member

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    This gets asked a lot but the reality is you can only apply for your MOC NOM in the state where you (your parents) reside. Therefore, comparing one state to another really doesn't serve a purpose with regard to applying to an SA.
     
  3. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    California, like other large states, is more competitive because of the competition for a Senatorial nomination. California, with 35+ million people is going to be more competitive for a nomination than smaller states simply based on number of applicants. However, you should definitely apply for all nominations available to you. The applicant pool varies each year and there are no absolutes except that if you don't apply for the nomination, you won't get it.

    Competition in California congressional districts varies each year by location and service academy. In general, most districts (but not all) around the major population areas (LA, SF, SD) will be very competitive every year. Inner cities and rural areas tend to have fewer applicants. So the short answer is that some CA districts are among the most competitive in the country and some are at the lower end of a very competitive scale.

    I take a different position on comparing odds - I always want to know what the competition is even if I can not change it. It does matter a great deal in selecting the order of preference of service academies in your MOC's district. Most MOC's allow you to apply for nominations to multiple SA's, but require you to rank them in order of preference. (Both Senators in CA require you to select only one SA). However, many MOC's will not give multiple nominations if there are too many good candidates. They do not want a 2nd or 3rd choice blocking a nomination for another competitive constituent's 1st choice. There are also differences in standards among the academies, in particular vision standards, that could change one's order of preference.
     
  4. Mere2033

    Mere2033 Member

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    Thank you for your responses. I live in the suburbs of S.F in low social economic city. But I'm sure the cities around me will be my competition. Every year there are one or two candidates in my city that get a nomination from my congressman so hopefully this will be a good year for me!
     
  5. time2

    time2 Member

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    However, trying to 'game' the NOM system can backfire if you only get a NOM to the SA that wasn't really your main interest. Lots of older discussion on that.
     
  6. wegiveaship

    wegiveaship Member

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    I am too! What district?
     
  7. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Good point. If someone really wants a particular academy, they should go for it.

    The only time it should be a consideration is if a candidate has no clear preference. For example, if a candidate would be happy at USMA or USNA, but their vision is worse than 20/40 USNA is more difficult to get an appointment than USMA. Without an LOA, USNA would be a risky first choice.
     
  8. Mere2033

    Mere2033 Member

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    'mi
     
  9. wegiveaship

    wegiveaship Member

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    District 2
     

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