Considering West Point

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by BlackKnights, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. BlackKnights

    BlackKnights New Member

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    I'm currently in highschool and my cousin just graduated West Point class of 2013. His younger brother and I are similar in age. We are both considering going to USMA. Although, I am a female. I have some questions about beast and everyday activities. Can you wear makeup? And if so, when? At beast, do they understand if you have health problems (because I have epilepsy) ? If your bun is too big and goes over your collar do they immediately cut your hair?

    And they relationship between classmates. Do upperclassmen make plebes feel different? Are plebes treated different?

    Rabble Rousers- I'm a highschool cheerleader and I would definitely consider being a rabble rouser at WP. To make the squad, do you have to know how to tumble? How do they choose the team? What is the rubric they go by? Any advice about the rabble rousers would be great.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Your Epilepsy will be the biggest issue you will have to deal with. If you have a current diagnosis and are on medication you will almost certainly be medically disqualified from West Point as well as joining any branch of the Military.

    During the application process you will be sent to Dodmerb for a Medical Physical, you will be required to fill out a Medical History Questionaire, you will be required to list Epilepsy on the form. After you complete the physical it will be sent for review, at this point they will determine if you are qualified medically. If you have a history of, or current Epilepsy you will probably be found Not Qualified.

    Best of luck.
     
  3. BlackKnights

    BlackKnights New Member

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    Thanks. I've always been interested in the military and spending time at West Point and seeing the graduation, parade, banquet, etc was phenomenal. I was diagnosed 2 years ago. I have a cyst on my Templar lobe that causes migraines. I haven't had a seizure in a while. I am on a lot of medication though. I still have quite a bit of time in high school so maybe I will become better and more healthier. I really want to go to West Point. Thanks for your input.
     
  4. majmattmason

    majmattmason Member

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    Agree with Jcleppe. Unfortunately, epilepsy is definitely going to keep you out of any of the academies and the military in general. You might get advice to "go for it" and see what happens, but if experience is any indicator, you'll be disqualified immediately and will not find any waivers.

    The only exception we've known were those who had childhood epilepsy and had not had a seizure in years without being on medication. This does not sound like your situation.

    Better to be straight up and disappoint now than build up false hopes. Our son was a cadet and later developed epilepsy. He was promptly medically discharged from the Army and tried in vain to get a waiver. It's completely understandable really. Having a seizure in any number of areas of operation would put lives at risk.
     
  5. BlackKnights

    BlackKnights New Member

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    To be honest, I'm only 15 years old and I was diagnosed when I was 13 with juvenile epilepsy. I have never had a seizure where I fall, pass out, and can't breathe. I've only had minor ones that lasted for maybe 10 seconds, (and I just shake) and that was when I was first diagnosed. I've been fine for a year now, but the medication has side effects and I think the next time I see my doctor, I'm going to see if I can be cleared. I really want to be in the military and I hope everything works out okay. Thanks for your responses because if I hadn't known, then I would have definitely been disappointed.
     
  6. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    And if you can't be in a uniformed service, there are ways to support the case as a civlian. You can even consider volunteering in the Civil Air Patrol or Coast Guard Auxiliary. There are many people who have a desire to serve this country. Some can't do that in the military because of disabilities, but there are ways to serve the country out of uniform.
     
  7. majmattmason

    majmattmason Member

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    IF, and that is a big IF, you can be cleared by your doctor while off the medication for many years prior to admissions, then you MAY have a shot. But to be clear, of all the various maladies, ailments and things that go bump in the night that prevent gaining an admission to an academy or basic training, epilepsy is one that is rarely (read: NEVER) accepted.

    About six months ago, a friend's son entered the Army after fighting the same battle to finally get a waiver to be cleared of his being diagnosed with juvenile epilepsy. He only had one seizure when he was around seven years old and had not been on any medication for over ten years. Wouldn't you know it, of all the things, during basic training he had a seizure, only his second in his life and that was the prompt end of his military career. Took him four months to out-process.

    I never want to discourage anyone from trying to gain admissions and will do whatever to cheer them on. But having been there, done that, I can tell you it's not going to happen if you have ever been diagnosed with epilepsy and are on medication to control the seizures.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013

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