Cross Commissioning

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Falconfan14, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. Falconfan14

    Falconfan14 Prospective

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    How does Interservice Commissioning work? Does it pretty much mean that you could go to say, the Naval Academy even though you want to be a Para-Rescue Jumper in the Air-Force like the name implies, orrrr?


    I meant for the title to be interservice commissioning, I apologize..
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  2. BillSL

    BillSL USMA Class of 2016

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    Cross commissioning means basically that a graduate from a Service Academy wishes to be commissioned in a another service. For that to happen, there must be a cadet from the Service Academy which's branch you wish to join willing to swap with you. Normally, there is 1 or 2 "cross commissioning cadets" in every class. It is HARD to get cross-commissioned.

    If your heart's intent is to be a Para-Rescue Jumper in the Air Force, you should prioritize the USAFA.
     
  3. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    Going to the "wrong" Academy with the intent to cross-commission is stupid. Here's why!

    At the start, it's a very small number that get approved. At most, one or MAYBE two per service. The reason why it's so few isn't just because it doesn't make sense to go to Navy when you want to be in the AF (or whatever). The Navy has to let you go. They've sunk a lot of money training you to be a Navy or Marine Officer and they're reluctant to just let all that money go so you can do something else. You need a very good reason. They don't want people who just hate the Naval Academy and assume the grass is greener in AF-land.
    A girl in my company from 2011 just cross commissioned Coast Guard. She had other reasons as well (probably even more than I'm aware of), but she had spent a semester at USCGA and that helped her case. There was a USMA cadet in my platoon at Leatherneck last block and he said there they base it off of a series of criteria including family history and continued interest (along with some other stuff I frankly don't remember), and there were still no guarantees. Being a strong performer helps.

    Another reason it's a bad idea is you have to be okay with not necessarily getting the exact job you want. For example, if you're at Navy and decide you want to be in the Army because you want to drive tanks so you try to cross commission, you would have to be okay with being in the Army and not being an Armor officer. At least here, you also might not find out whether or not you're selected until very late in the game. The girl in my company who went Coast Guard didn't find out until April that her request to do so was approved. Otherwise, she would've gone SWO.
     
  4. Falconfan14

    Falconfan14 Prospective

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    Makes sense, I'm going to do some more research on the AFA. Thanks! :shake:
     
  5. usnabgo08

    usnabgo08 USNA 2008/BGO

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    Falconfan 14,

    Please read link, it explains the procedures/channels of ISC.
    http://www.usna.edu/Commandant/Inst..._COMMISSIONING_OF_NAVAL_ACADEMY_GRADUATES.pdf

    Of note, approval authority for ISC is the Service Secretary. Essentially, you will be making your justification to him/her and believe me, someone from the SECNAV's office briefs your package and gives a recommendation. This is also why, as Hurricane12 mentioned, MIDN don't get a response until late -- since it has to be flown all the way to the SECNAV (and it really isn't a top priority in the grand scheme of things).
     

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