CrossFit vs Unit PT

Discussion in 'Academy/Military News' started by bruno, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Despite all of the hype a year or so ago about revised PT programs- I believe that most Army unit PT is in reality the same thing it has been for the last 70 years - Pushups, situps, 4-5 mile run. I think adopting CrossFit apporach is an excellent idea- I hope that they really do pursue this. Scoutpilot- have you heard about this test at Leavenworth?

    http://blogs.militarytimes.com/pt36...whats-likely-the-biggest-crossfit-study-ever/
     
  2. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    I agree that the Cross-Fit concept (not necessarily approach) is superior to the basic calisthenics approach of traditional Army PT session.

    That being said, where most Cross-Fit franchises rub me wrong is in the lack of coaching on proper technique to minimize injury risk. Having talked to a few folks who have been there, none of them report getting adequate coaching on technique for exercises that entail significant risk of injury. Perhaps my sample is small and of those who have discontinued the system, but it does worry me.

    That being said, the Army is an excellent training organization and if they commit to a more varied workout regimen the right way, it will create more complete athletes on the field of battle. However, if they do it wrong, I see many more medical costs in the VA system...
     
  3. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    The First Rule of Crossfit: You MUST talk about Crossfit!
    :shake::rolleyes:

    Varied exercises can be a great thing for complete fitness. That said, high-intensity, high-impact exercise programs have higher rates of injury.

    ...and yeah, standard .mil exercise routines are generally effective but incredibly boring!
     
  4. cga82

    cga82 Banned

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    Boy, ain't that the truth!

    and Ramius

    "That said, high-intensity, high-impact exercise programs have higher rates of injury."

    I've seen several people at O-dark thirty doing this and some have been hurt.

    More of the "Get your Disabilities" for over doing it. That we will have to pay for.
     
  5. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    The vast majority of people in the military are not in the "correct" shape to be participating in a Cross-fit type of exercise program. The number of repetitive use injuries would likely sky-rocket if not implemented in the correct way.

    In my experience there is a large group of people in the military who get fit "just enough" twice a year. This group of people is not the target audience for Cross-fit or other high intensity training programs.
     
  6. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Sadly that is the point exactly- far too many people in the military are really office dwellers in uniform when it comes to their physical condition- The number of bubblebutts you can see in uniform is truly staggering. But for Army and Marine Infantry type units- physical strength and capability is a major requirement to do the job, and Army unit PT programs do a pretty lame job. The Airborne Shuffle is a sad parody of PT designed mostly to tighten your calves, and knocking off a couple of hundred pushups- Big deal- I do that now at 57. So the PT that really gets people in shape is done on their own time- which means that unit PT is mostly a waste of time and which stresses only the "good enough to pass twice a year" crowd. I don't believe that Crossfit itself is necessarily anything special- and Lord knows that they do lots of self promoting. But their approach does maximize the physical benefit in roughly the same amount of time that most units have for PT using the concept that really high intensity output done in a changing variety of exercises for a relatively short amount of time is a more effective way to develop real strength. And that is worth a few stress injuries IMHO.
     
  7. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I don't think that unit PT is "mostly a waste of time." For the majority, it allows them to maintaine a baseline fitness level.

    Some units do better job than others. First line leaders bear some respnsbilities in conducting push up, situp, and run PT vs some creative PT to challenge soldiers and maintain/improve their fitness.
     
  8. Boozebin

    Boozebin Member

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    As a side at Air Force Prep the "fatboy" program is more crossfit type. My DS, the twig that he is, failed his first PFT at Prep and was put in the program. Since then he's gain 30 pounds and is passing the PFT no problem.

    I asked him since he's passed the PFT will he continue working out with them and he said yes it's a better workout than anything he would come up with. He's seeing huge gains and found a new love of the gym since the program.

    I know it's a small sample and easier to monitor than a whole unit but I would think that someone could scale a program to meet the needs.
     
  9. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    From my viewpoint, unit PT was primarily a vehicle to build and maintain unit cohesion.

    I suppose it could be used to assess an individual’s fitness if it was very poor (if they fall out of a run for instance) and I grant that it would help maintain some level of fitness. But I was not aware of anyone who only did unit PT. Everyone worked out morning, noon and night on their own. It was a way of life.

    Much like we tell ROTC members, weekly ROTC PT is not enough to maintain standards. Individual training is required to build and maintain the fitness levels expected of service members.
     
  10. cga82

    cga82 Banned

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    The injuries would be unnecessary. IMHO

    MemberLG and USMCGrunt have a good assessment.

    I don't think that unit PT is "mostly a waste of time." For the majority, it allows them to maintain a baseline fitness level.

    "First line leaders bear some responsibilities in conducting push up, sit up, and run PT vs some creative PT to challenge soldiers and maintain/improve their fitness."

    and

    "From my viewpoint, unit PT was primarily a vehicle to build and maintain unit cohesion."

    It's really a leadership job. You take care of your people. Not only that their needs are met but they can do the job physically. If someone is lagging then the unit gets them to step up. Team work! Team effort!

    The semi-annual PT is a minimal standard.

    Heck, the Coast Guard doesn't even have a PT test. That's embarrassing! But then again it's not under DOD but enjoys all the bennies.:thumbdown:
     
  11. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    They will soon, if it hasn't already been implemented.

    Just curious, what "Bennies" would you like to see taken away?
     
  12. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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  13. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Too funny.
     
  14. cga82

    cga82 Banned

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    I've been hearing that a PT is in the works for years and years. I see no implementation. Could you show the policy?

    The "Bennies"; All of them since we are not under DOD but this should be under another thread if you would like to start one.
     
  15. cga82

    cga82 Banned

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  16. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    No thank you, I'll leave that up to you.

    Guess you've never heard of the DuffleBlog......yes, it's a joke.
     
  17. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Duffle blog is equivalent to The Onion. Both quite humorous at times.

    Sent using the Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  18. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Probably a good time to mention that the "bennies" are not all DOD based, and are not only for DOD components.

    In fact, I'm not sure how much of the "bennies" are even DOD funded....

    But I would suggest that there are many in DOD with less "hands on" experience in operations than the Coast Guard. If you can have a single base in Texas that is larger than an entire service, you have to expect that.

    The "bennies" I received were either paid for by the Coast Guard, or by the VA. A few little trips were paid for by DOD.... but that's because they were OSD-PA sponsored programs the Coast Guard supported.
     

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