CULP Experiences

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Jkaz, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. Jkaz

    Jkaz Member

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    I've seen a few threads posted by cadets and their parents about CULP and simply would like to know more.

    What are some of the places Cadets have been and how was it?
    What did you do specifically in CULP?
    What would you recommend to a rising freshman in AROTC about trying to do CULP?
    Other Programs similar to CULP?

    I have googled around a bit, but the personal stories are more interesting than a summary off the rotc.usaac website. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    CULP is reported to be competitive, but I don't know the ratio of applicants to participants. Cadet Command says the goal is to have at least half of all cadets participate.

    Also there is a timing issue: applications must be submitted in the late fall, and your PMS will have to recommend you. Similar to other summer programs, you would have to be contracted. I don't know how this works for you as a 3-year advance scholarship awardee. (Congratulations on your scholarship)

    From the descriptions I've read or heard, CULP is a wonderful opportunity to experience another culture. You may find yourself working on infrastructure projects or teaching English to foreign military personnel. Cadet Command is sending people to countries all over the world. Some points I've gleaned which would enhance the experience:

    If you don't speak the language of the country you're assigned to, make some effort to acquire what you can of the language. There is sufficient time between school's end and your reporting to Ft. Knox. Even if you have some previous exposure to it, bring a dictionary with you. Make an effort to communicate in the local language and remember, just because people don't speak English, they are not idiots. Whatever their level of intellect, it will not improve if you speak louder.

    You are not there to proselytize for your particular religion, despite its superiority to all others (including those of your fellow cadets).

    Keep in mind that you are a representative of the USA, the US Army, ROTC and your battalion. If you act like a jerk, word will work its way formally or informally around the world. The return to campus next month may be uncomfortable for some.

    The US consulate may offer to convert your money to the local currency. While this will undoubtedly be a good deal, retain some of your greenbacks. Otherwise, you will see why when you try to pay with Thai baht or Malaysian ringgit at the Cinnabun or whatever at Louisville airport on the way home.

    Do your best to get exercise while overseas. See below.

    Local beer may be cheap and delicious, but don't get too familiar with it. The debate over whether one buys beer or merely rents it will long persist, in either case you may end up wearing it.

    Fellow cadets who laugh at you at Ft. Knox for bringing beef jerky or a canister of protein powder will not be laughing when they are served up rice and mystery meat stew at the Kampala mess hall. Oh, by the way, especially if you are in a third world country, you are likely during your stay to develop shall we say intestinal discomfort. You are not dying and it will pass in a day or two. Keep taking those pills.

    At some point you will go sightseeing by bus, stopping in a quaint village or at a market for souvenirs. If you are still negotiating as the bus is preparing to leave, and you find yourself handing the vendor a 20,000 piastre note through the window for that Buddha carved in soapstone, don't be shocked if he doesn't hand back change.

    Hanky-panky? No thankee.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2012
  3. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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  4. Jkaz

    Jkaz Member

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    EDelahanty and clarksonarmy,

    Thank you, this is exactly was I was looking for.
     
  5. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    I assume Jkaz, that you are a 3 year AD Scholarship awardee, Congratulations by the way.

    The biggest issue with CULP applications is that you are required to be a contracted cadet. As a 3 year AD you won't contract until your sophomore year so as of now the soonest you could attend CULP would be the summer after your sophomore year.

    As Edelahanty said the application process is in the Fall so if by some chance they upgrade your 3 year to a 4year at the beginning of your freshman year you could still squeez in next year.
     
  6. Jkaz

    Jkaz Member

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    I am in fact a 3 year recipient, and thank you. That was one aspect that I was worried about and after searching around a bit, then reading your post Jcleppe, you are correct. It’s a bit disappointing not being able to apply for CULP until sophomore year, but it’s a small aspect of ROTC as a whole. I just can’t wait for the morning PT, FTX and labs.
    Second point; are there any statistics out there about 3 year awardee’s getting upgraded to a 4 year as you stated? If so I assume recommendation from the PMS is required, but that may not be entirely true. I’ll try and do some research myself, but this forum is probably the best and easiest way to get answers, although it’s not the typical scholarship question.
     
  7. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Your going to find that it depends on the battalion and what is available. My son's battalion upgraded one cadets 3 year to a 3.5 year last year at the start of the second semester. Upgrades to a full 4 year in the Fall are rare.

    Work hard your first year, good GPA, great APFT and you will put yourself in a good position for opportunities your sophomore year. The competition is tough these days, my son had a 3.7 GPA and a 319 on both recorded APFT's and he was not the number one cadet.

    Best of luck to you.
     

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