DAD Seeking Gouge/Advice for a USNA 2019 Candidate

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by NAVYDAD1971, Aug 20, 2014.

  1. NAVYDAD1971

    NAVYDAD1971 Member

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    Hi all - new to this board but I 've been looking through and gotten lots of good gouge from everyone. I'm trying to see how we should proceed.

    My DD is a 2019 candidate and her requirements are complete (per CIS). She's also qualifed per DODMERB and has a PRES nom based off of my service. However her SAT/ACT's are weak but she's in the 50th percentile (she's retaking in Sept. and Oct) and she's got lots of ECA's, ranked 1 in her class and has several varsity letters (including leadership positions).

    Her NROTC application is also complete and waiting to get boarded. She is also contemplating the USMMA which gives her a shot as a navy reserve officer.

    The BGO was extremely nice and accomodating. She also mentioned that even though we have PRES nom we should continue to purse MOC's - which we will of course. We live in a VERY competitive district/state so I'm not holding too much weight on the MOC's given her average SAT/ACT scores and she's got one shot at each before Nov.

    My question about the PRES NOM. I've read that only 100 slots are given to the USNA. She's has one but could it be taken away and given to a more highly qualified candidate?

    All in all, this experience as been rewarding and educational. My 13 year old DS has already expressed interest so now I have a good head start and can prepare!

    Thanks.

    NAVYDAD1971
     
  2. Cidgrad130

    Cidgrad130 Member

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    You can think of the Presidenial nominations as a kind of slate (just as many MOCs use). In the case of a MOC slate, they will contain 10 names, but most years only one of those names will likely be charged against the MOC for an appointment. Which doesn't mean that the other 9 candidates will not be on another slate (either another MOC, Presidential, etc.).

    The Presidential slate is unlimited because if the candidate qualifies due to your service they will be placed on the slate. However, only 100 on the slate will be charged against it for appointments. My DS is also on the Presidential slate for the class of 2019. He addressed this specific question to his admissions officer (the BGO was unsure). The admissions officer said that historically there are between 600-800 candidates on the Presidential nom slate. I suppose if all of those candidates did not receive another nomination source then their chances would be about 12-16% of receiving an appointment via the Presidential nom. But of course, many of the candidates on the Presidential nom slate are very competitive candidates and have multiple nominating sources - and will therefore increase their individual chances of being offered an appointment.

    Ultimately, it is up to the admissions department who gets appointed via the Presidential nom. While it can increase your DD's chances statistically, it is no golden ticket and she should definitely maximize her chances by competing for all the nomination sources she can.
     
  3. NAVYDAD1971

    NAVYDAD1971 Member

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    Thanks for the info!
     
  4. HappyKat

    HappyKat Member

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    Have her try the ACT test too. Some kids find it easier than the SAT.
     
  5. Campfamily

    Campfamily Member

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    ^^^^^+1^^^^^

    My son tested significantly higher on the ACT than the SAT. I also recommend your daughter does both, and also tests more than once.

    Keith
     
  6. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    If your DD hasn't already done so, suggest an SAT/ACT prep course. Scoring well isn't solely about innate intelligence; it's also about understanding the test and test-taking skills for this particular type of test.

    Practice also helps. Use Barron's or whatever other sources are available today. Treat practice for the SAT as another "class" in school -- put some effort into it every single night. Years ago, I raised my math score 180 points solely with self-study and practice. So it can be done.

    As for the Pres nom, no one can "take it away." It may be enough by itself for an appointment; it may not be. That's why she should apply for all -- you never know what MOCs will do; not all put huge emphasis on standardized test scores.
     
  7. NCdoc

    NCdoc Member

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    You mentioned having only one sitting of each standardized test before November. USNA accepted tests taken in January during the past admission cycle.
    Being #1 in the class is a big deal.
    Taking SAT/ACT prep and really focusing on the practice tests helped. I think math practice tests especially help. Practice on the types of questions on the reading sections helps. Test prep is dull but helpful.
    Math scores also go up with experience in Sr. year math.
     
  8. NAVYDAD1971

    NAVYDAD1971 Member

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    Thanks all for the great advice! We've got a tutor helping her out for the ACT/SAT. If things don't pan out, her ROTC schools have very good programs and aren't too out of reach (IMO). I'm also hoping that her family history/legacy helps out a bit. We have over 50+ years of Navy service (several generations). I'm still amazed at the amount of work and effort this takes. Personally, as a mustang who got commissioned through the DCO program, I've had the mentallity that an "Ensign is an Ensign is an Ensign" and that it didn't really matter how you get your commission. But after a few years, I'm starting to see the value and the downfalls of the various programs (DCO, LDO, OCS, ROTC, etc.) but I is still believe it's really up to the individual.

    The one thing that surprised me that I learned from these threads was the fact that USNA takes into consideration the potential career length of an candidate. Anecdotally, I've had lots of USNA buddies who did their 5 years and got out while most of the OCS', ROTC's (and obviously LDO's) did their full 20. I've also been told that (incorrectly I believe) that the overwhelming majority of flags are USNA alumni only because of the "Network".

    There was one experience that discouraged and upset me a bit while going through this process. I asked a former BGO for some advice and he told me that the fact that my DD is a minority but not one of the URM's and that she doesn't participate in a varsity sport such as football or basketball it killed her chances of getting into NAP's. I know he's wrong (and I understand this is hot button issue) but I worry that this type of sterotyping starts to sink in, even with the NAPSTER's. From time to time I attend courses at Newport and I've heard other O's jokingly refer to NAP's as affirmative action planning. Its dishearting.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2014
  9. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    It helps but only a bit. It's not so much being a legacy but that someone from a military family likely has a better understanding of what a SA/the military is like and thus may be more likely to stick it out.

    I agree with that wholeheartedly.

    I don't believe this is accurate and, in any event, I'm not sure how it can be measured. No way can a 17-yr-old "kid" know whether he/she will spend a career in the military, let alone can USNA Admissions make that decision. One of the many things my father told me that turned out to be true -- everyone is surprised who sticks it out and who doesn't.

    There are two prep programs -- NAPS and Foundation. First, most attendees at both are varsity athletes b/c 90% of those admitted to USNA are varsity athletes. Most students at either program are not football or basketball players, although certainly some of each are in prep programs. While there are URMs at NAPS, there are many who are not. Ditto with Foundation.

    And, yes, it's a hot button topic.:smile:

    Don't get too stressed this early on. It's a long ride!
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2014
  10. NAVYDAD1971

    NAVYDAD1971 Member

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    Thank you usna1985. The gouge you put out is always spot on!
     
  11. bearhunter66

    bearhunter66 Member

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    NAVYDAD1971,
    Your original post referenced USMMA. Presidential noms are n/a at Kings Point so application to MOCs is not an option if that is the course she wants to chart.

    BH
     

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