Diagnosed with asthma while in NROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by dhenry94, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. dhenry94

    dhenry94 Member

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    Recently I have been havng issues with the 3 mile PT sessions my unit runs. After doing our physical reports the unit staff came across my file, which indicated I had asthma, and a heart murmur earlier in my lfe around age 11. Then I saw a cardioligist, who cleared me for the murmur. However I went in for a pulmonary exam, and was diagnosed with mild intermittant asthma( excercised induced). Before this when I was younger, my PCP always told me despite the asthma my lungs were fine for the most part. I don't even feel the difference of the asthma when I ran, I always assumed I was ust out of shape since I played sports frm 6th-12th grade, but the pulmonary specialist informed me my peak airflow results were below normal by 10%. My question is, since I'm in NROTC on scholarship, and they knew about my asthma befr hand, will I still be disenrolled medically most likly?:confused:
     
  2. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    DODMERB and Navy both knew that you had asthma annotated in your medical records and still qualified you or waived you? Did you list your heart murmur and asthma on you medical history when you did your DODMERB?
    My initial guess is that you are going to be DQ'd and potentially disenrolled for failure to disclose if I'm reading your post correctly. If you don't get medically disqualified I would imagine being unable to pass the PT test will be next on the list.
     
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I read your post a little differently and assumed you had disclosed since being on scholarship also means you were DoDMERB qualified or waivered. If you failed to disclose I would say your in deep do-do.

    A lot might have to do with whether you're Marine Option or Navy Option. If you're Navy option I would assume you'll still be able to pass the PFA so you might be OK. I suppose they could also make a change to restricted line only at commissioning. If you're a Marine Option (and I'm guessing you are since you mention the 3 mile runs) then I think the future might be a bit grimmer, but if disenrollment comes up and you're willing to do it and meet the academic requirements you might ask about switching to Navy Option. It happens.

    Keep in mind I'm just trying to do some logical surmising here. YMMV.

    EDIT: You health is most important and it might be wise to see a doc. Also, you don't mention your school, but if you're in the south it could be seasonally induced issues that are leading to your present problems.
     
  4. dhenry94

    dhenry94 Member

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    I am a navy option, and yes they qualified me unrestricted line NROTC, and USNA. So they knew about my history of asthma way before. It's not particularly debilitating, as I played sports since 6th grade, and I've only used an inhaler when I'd get a horrible respiratory infection as a kid. It's just the fact I run slower than I should, and look extremely drained, so when I went to San Antonio MTF, they informed me that I have mild intermittent asthma, and that my O2 consumption was normal when sitting, just my peak airflow showed signs of asthma, and when stress was induced so did my O2 consumption. I never had a pulmonary function test before, just a notation of asthma, a stethoscope on my back to listen to my lungs, and the doc would always say "Your'e good to go". Also, it's no way I could lie about my asthma, since it directly states childhood asthma at age 9, cleared by 11.
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Good to know. You may just have to ride this out and see what happens. As long as you pass the PFA it may not be an issue. If it becomes an issue they might change you to restricted line. Worse case is your dismissed. Like I said you'll just have to ride it out and see how it unfolds. Just don't put yourself in danger. If you sense you will then you need to have some discussions with cadre, which may not be a bad idea in any case.
     
  6. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    I am with Kinnem on this but be prepared for bad news or a drastic change in your service field. PT is not the deal breaker with asthma but shipboard fires, a common occurrence, are. To have compromised lungs and be in a smoke-filling compartment or passageway can be fatal. It all depends on the type of lung sensitivity and nobody outside of the Navy medical pulmonary field can answer that. Good luck and hope things work out.
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Good point Spud!
     
  8. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    dhenry94: I think you have a couple things to consider here. First, if you are falling out of runs it will probably be reflected in the unit's evaluation on your performance. Second, if you are failing the PFT that will be an issue. If instead, your scores are low but not unsatisfactory you may be alright for your unit. If this newly diagnosed condition is accepted by the unit as the reason for your run times you may get a "pass" but don't give them any other reason to judge you: weight, other PT categories like sit ups and push ups, grades, character, appearance, etc.

    Finally, I believe that you will have to undergo another DODMERB clearance prior to commissioning. This condition - well documented during College - could create a need for further evaluation etc. Because of this, it is important to understand what the qualifying/ disqualifying standards are.

    The above is personal opinion and not based on any first hand experience.
     

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