Did I bomb the application?!?!

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by usnaorbust2018, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. usnaorbust2018

    usnaorbust2018 New Member

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    Hello everyone,
    I have just finished reading a thread on another website which included someone asking a question about whether or not to answer the "adversity" questions on the application. It said they were optional, and since I've never had any major adversity, I didn't want to make something up, or put something trivial like the death of a dog or something, so I left those ones blank (the adversity one, and the special circumstances one). But on the thread, they said do not leave those blank because it shows you are too lazy to think of something. Now I'm really nervous because it was not my intention to got through the application quickly or sloppily. I really took my time, but, like I said, thought including something that was fairly trivial in the grand scheme would make me seem like a sissy. Did I ruin my chances of getting in? Is there any way I can fix my mistake even though I've already submitted that portion? Please help!

    -Caleigh
     
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Don't lose sleep over it.

    One thing you'll hear when preparing for interviews, always have something prepared for a "do you have anything else you'd like to say" question. It's an opportunity to get some more messaging in.

    So, while you could have advertised yourself a little more with those optional essays, like you said, they're optional.



    What's more important now, is for you to relax. You've turned in your stuff and it's out of your hands. Just relax. I know that's easy for me to say, but that this point you need to occupy yourself with anything else to get your mind off of this.

    My personal opinion, you didn't bomb an application by not filling in optional essays with meaningless words. If you really had something to add, sure, you missed an opportunity to advocate for youself. But you also likely gave them a pretty good taste of who you are with the required essays.

    So don't worry and try to relax and "enjoy" the waiting game.
     
  3. futuremarinemom

    futuremarinemom Member

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    Don't worry about it. My Plebe didn't write anything for the "adversity" or " unusual circumstances" questions, even though he did have some unusual circumstances along the way. He felt that it would be making excuses or whining. Some candidates truly have had adversity, and explaining the situation could help admissions to understand them better, but if you have to grasp at straws to come up with something, it may be better to leave that section blank.
     
  4. 18'er

    18'er Member

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    I agree with this line of thought. I would think that "adversity" or "special circumstances" should only be used to explain perhaps an aberration in grades one year due to a death in the family, a sports injury that required significant rehab, etc. If you grew up in a "Leave it to Beaver" household, without any significant problems, then any answer you put in this category could come off as contrived.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    I agree. If you are fortunate enough not to have had significant adversity, be thankful for that.

    Yes, it's an opportunity to say more but, if there is nothing to say, making stuff up (i.e., taking a minor issue and blowing it into major adversity) isn't going to help.

    Things that might be relevant: needing to work to support family; having to take care of one's siblings; parent or sibling ill or dying; being involved in vehicle accident, home destroyed by fire, tornado, etc. This is not an exhaustive list -- merely examples.

    The reason for asking about adversity is that things such as those mentioned above can explain why some candidates may be "deficient" in certain areas -- e.g., lack of ECAs, lack of sports, poor grades for a short timeframe, etc.
     
  6. usnaorbust2018

    usnaorbust2018 New Member

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    Okay phew. You guys really settled me down. On the thread almost everyone was agreeing that even if you did grow up in an average family with nothing major wrong, each candidate's idea of adversity was acceptable. I agree your son, futuremarinemom, that since I was fortunate to grow up with a wonderful family in our wonder country with not to many rough times, I don't have any excuses to explain away any less than exemplary grades or activities. If my grades/ test scores aren't good enough, it's solely on me.

    My BGO is coming to my house tonight for the interview, so I think I might bounce the question off him just to make sure. One question for the BGO interview: my sister painted my finger nails a Barbie-colored pink last night, and there is no chips in it and my nails are cut short and neat. Would it be inappropriate to keep the nail polish on? I'm leaning towards taking it off, but it does look pretty good, and it took her about 20 minutes to do...

    Thanks again, love this website!
    :thumb:
     
  7. LTSackett

    LTSackett Member

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    Assuming you're female, I wouldn't think it'd be a problem. ;-)
     
  8. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    take off the hot pink nail polish. First, because you already have a doubt about it, and are already leaning toward taking it off. You want to have the interview feeling confident and without any distractions or doubts.

    Pale pearlescent pink would have been fine. I don't say this because of the Academy in particular -- it applies to almost all job interviews. Of course you don't need a formal suit, but not tattered jeans, sweat pants, or lululemons either. Nothing that would look out of place at an Accounting firm in terms of clothing/shoes, jewelry, makeup, nails or hair. Do you happen to remember the initial reaction of the Admissions Committee at Harvard Law while reviewing Elle Woods' application for admission in the movie Legally Blond? Don't do THAT
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  9. Packer

    Packer Member

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    +1
     
  10. Scooter11

    Scooter11 Member

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    What did your B&G say regarding the issue?
     

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