Disenrollment Question

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by xsurfer, Nov 29, 2012.

  1. xsurfer

    xsurfer Parent

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    If a C1C is considering voluntary disenrollment from the Academy, does the process require that the cadet inform his/her parents before disenrollment becomes official?
     
  2. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Once you're in the military, you have no legal obligation to notify your parents of anything. Thus, USAFA cannot make it part of the process; they can recommend you do it but not force you to do it.

    Personally, I think it's an issue of sufficient importance to let them know first. Unless you have a very strained relationship, they might be able to provide some insight on your decision.
     
  3. Blue&SilverBear

    Blue&SilverBear USAFA Alumnus

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    Does said C1C realize that they will straight up receive a bill for ~$160K or have to serve enlisted time?
     
  4. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    A C1C who is "VOLUNTARILY" dis-enrolling from the academy definitely needs "Counseling". Maybe mental health counseling. If you don't want the military and are willing to pay back the education; at least wait another few months until you have your diploma. Then back out.

    If you're willing to do enlisted time because you don't want to be an officer; then again, wait a few months, get your diploma, then back out of commissioning and take the enlisted spot.

    If the "VOLUNTARY" is not a true voluntary; and it's sort of: "Volunteer to leave, or we're going to kick you out or charge you with something"; then that's a totally different category.

    Bottom line: Whatever the reason for "voluntarily" wanting to leave the academy; as a C1C; you should still stick it out and get your diploma. You can always get out of being commissioned if that's what you really want to do. Just my $0.0234848398
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    With the current sequestration issue at our door, it is more likely that they will not be offered an enlistment option.

    Gojira on this site can prove that. Her DS didn't voluntarily leave last yr from NROTC, he was dis-enrolled 6 weeks prior to commissioning for being 8lbs overweight, and handed a $143K bill since he was scholarship. Last I knew he wasn't given the option of paying it back over 10 yrs., it was much less time than that. They hired a military attorney to allow him to at least serve enlisted, and they lost.

    A few yrs back DS's AFROTC friend on scholarship dis-enrolled at the C2C point and he was handed a 40K plus bill. No enlistment option.

    I know of another poster here who when they commissioned they received an ED with a follow on for UPT. They toyed with the idea of trying to get out of the UPT slot, and was told, if he went that route, didn't get picked up for his new AFSC, they could/may hand him his walking papers AND a bill for the AFA. That stopped him in his tracks.

    Finally, if that C1C took that loan, and if it is like the loan AFROTC cadets get, look at the fine print. The devil is always in the details. That low APR jumps up to @19% if they leave before their commitment is over, be it dis-enrollment or separated. :eek::eek: Now you can be on the dime for 160K + 25-35K at 19%.

    In this economy, if you are thinking of leaving make sure you have a job lined up that can afford you the ability to pay back big bucks for yrs to come.

    If that is the desire, I wouldn't worry about telling the folks. I would worry about how I could afford to go to MickeyD's after paying back @200K on a monthly payment plan without declaring bankruptcy at 22.
     
  6. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Folks,

    Let's give the OP a break. He asked a specific question, which has been answered. While people here may have views on his decision, a C1C is an adult. And I'm sure that the right people at USAFA will inform him of any potential consequences of his/her decision. It's really not our place to comment on the the merits of his/her decision, unless asked.
     
  7. DevilDog

    DevilDog Member

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    A friend of our family was disenrolled from USMA last summer because his GPA was not up to standard. He was going into his Senior year. He did not get a bill for his education. I think 11 others were disenrolled with him. Who decides if they get a bill?
    It is not right to hand some young kid a bill for his education if they have given their all and could not cut it. If a person disenrolls due to their own reason, then by all means, hand them the bill.
     
  8. dohdean

    dohdean Member

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    I may be wrong about this. But I do not believe that the disenrollment "bill", if presented, can be discharged in bankruptcy. My daughter, a C1C, says her class has been told that it cannot be discharged.
     
  9. haz

    haz Member

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    It cannot be discharged in BK, same as Gov. backed student loans
     
  10. fencersmother

    fencersmother Founding Member

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    Oh my. I find this whole discussion to be on the scare-me-to-drink level. Huge repayments, disenrollments - voluntary or otherwise, job/no job...bankruptcy!!!

    I do hope everyone gives serious to consideration before these issues raise their terribly ugly heads.
     
  11. mdanderson

    mdanderson Member

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    Adult or not, if a cadet is struggling this far into the CIC year the question we should be asking is if he/she is okay. The focus should be on the cadet's health, safety and well being, and hoping that someone at the academy is supporting this individual, not discussing the consequences of dis-enrollment. As a parent whose DS lost two close friends both in their senior year, I would absolutely expect the academy to contact a parent when there is a unanticipated withdrawal concern--- and I can tell you that they are much more proactive about communication then they used to be. These young men and women need to know that they can reach out and not feel trapped by the fear of failure, disappointing others or monetary commitments. If they are unhappy--for whatever reason, they have to feel safe enough to seek counsel and help. Even a cadet experiencing an involuntary dis-enrollment needs support.
     

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