Do your chances of getting a ROTC scholarship increase if you applied last year and didn't get it?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Soap, Jul 21, 2015.

  1. Soap

    Soap Member

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    If I applied for a scholarship the year previous and I was rejected, does applying a second time increase my chances?

    Anyone know if there are actual statistics/percentages?
     
  2. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Which scholarship are you referring too, AROTC, NROTC, or AFROTC.
     
  3. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    First off, if you were rejected, then unless you corrected what you were rejected for then you will still be rejected. If you meant to say you weren't selected for a scholarship offer then you shouldn't really be reapplying. What you should be doing is attending college and enrolling in an ROTC program and competing for a campus based scholarship. If you still don't get a scholarship offer you can still commission non scholarship if you are offered a non scholarship contract I would say that if you reapply for the scholarship while you are taking a gap year at best your chances won't change and taking a gap year may diminish your chances. I don't see a board member looking favorably on a gap year.

    Make sense??
     
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  4. Soap

    Soap Member

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    I'm a sophomore in high school, I was just curious.

    Let me clarify my statement. If I didn't get a scholarship the previous year, but I'm in ROTC without a scholarship, does that help your chances?
     
  5. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    It's going to depend on the school/ROTC Battalion. I would think that your chances would certainly not increase, but depending on the school and how many scholarships they received from the national process you might still have a chance. You are going to be evaluated by your performance on campus, so it will be a whole new ball game.
     
  6. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    I'm not sure you understand.

    If you apply for a scholarship and are not awarded the scholarship, then you start college and enroll in ROTC, there is not another application process. The Battalion will give scholarships to cadets in the program that excel based on the ranking of the cadets and whether they have the funding and slots available. There is not another formal scholarship application process once you start school if you were not awarder a scholarship through the National Application Process.

    This is for Army ROTC, the other services work differently.
     
  7. Soap

    Soap Member

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    Ohhhh, I was not aware. Thanks for info. I'm actually interested in NROTC, do you know how it works for them?
     
  8. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Not really, but I know that they do have an application process for Mids that are in the program.
     
  9. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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  10. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

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    Soap -- this is a great "life lesson" you have now realized and other young "lurkers" need to understand -- do not assume things are the same across ROTC programs or Service Academies. Details matter. Get to know the intricate rules of each SA and/or ROTC program you are interested in. I know somethings about USAFA, USMA, AFROTC, AROTC and DoDMERB. I know nothing about NROTC or USNA. Become an expert in NROTC. It will increase your chances of gaining a scholarship.
     
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  11. mattjr96

    mattjr96 Member

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    I'm not saying this is completely incorrect but I don't wholly agree with that. I applied with near identical stats my Freshman year of college as my Senior year of high school. Wasn't selected senior year, was selected freshman year. It can be a bit of a roll of the dice each round. Keep applying, if anything it shows determination, and THAT makes a favorable difference.
     
  12. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Curiosity question.

    Matt you do know Clarkson is not a cadet, he has his own blog, and the reason his name here is Clarkson is because he works at Clarkson University in the AROTC unit.
     
  13. Dawgs19

    Dawgs19 Member

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    I was awarded a 4 year Army ROTC scholarship to the Citadel and from what I'm told, if you were not picked to receiver a 4 year scholarship, you can re-apply after your freshman year of college for a 3- year scholarship and because you applied before hand it actually does increase your chances
     
  14. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    You were told wrong. Once you start the AROTC program you aren't reapplying for scholarships at a national level. Your performance on campus will determine if you are offered a scholarship or contract.

    Simply reapplying doesn't make you look better if you haven't improved. If you're rejected the first time and don't improve your test scores or PT or grades, all you are showing the board is how to waste time. It's not USMA, you aren't showing heart and determination and how bad you want it by reapplying for a scholarship (that you can't reapply for anyways). Performance is what matters at that point.
     
  15. Dawgs19

    Dawgs19 Member

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    I definitely agree with you if the situation is where they fail an APFT or an interview doesn't go well, my answer was more geared towards if the slots filled up too quick. My friend heard about what I was doing, decided he wanted to apply but couldn't get a slot, he is also attending the Citadel and our recruiting officer told him that as long as his scores remained the same and his grades were good during his freshman year, he was golden for the three year. But I agree completely with you in the sense that if you fail for bad scores or whatever else, reapplying without out improving your scores won't do anything I think I was confusing in my first post thank you for clearing things up
     
  16. Wilco

    Wilco Member

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    Dawgs19,
    Clarkson and Bull, along with Bama are pretty straight on with AROTC information as they are, or with Bull were, directly involved.

    Below is from Norwich Univ., ARTOC site. May clear up questions for you. Highlighted main point on National scholarships. Good luck at Citadel.
    ----------------------
    There are several different types of scholarship and contracting opportunities:

    National Based
    Campus Based
    SMP

    National Based
    National Army ROTC Scholarships are awarded to High School seniors who will soon graduate or obtain an equivalent certificate. Students can be awarded a 3-year or 4-year scholarship at the National Based scholarship process.

    Scholarships cover full tuition and mandatory fees for the term of the award. Competition of these scholarships is high, as over 10,000 students from across the country complete for them annually. The selection rates for these limited scholarships are small, sometimes as low as 30%.

    The 4-yr scholarships pay for 4 years of college (tuition + most fees, book stipend, monthly stipend). The 3AD scholarship pays for only 3 years of college. The first year is on the student, and is the “validation” year.

    The two critical steps to validate a 3AD scholarship are 1) a student-cadet must achieve a 2.5 cumulative GPA and 3.0 cumulative ROTC by the end of the 1st year, and 2) pass the Army physical fitness test (APFT). After a student-cadet is awarded a scholarship (of any type) he/she must maintain a 2.0 GPA (semester and cumulative) to include ROTC and pass the APFT to keep the scholarship. (Refer to the contract for additional details). Scholarship awardees receive a book allowance of $1,200 per year and receive a monthly tax free stipend.

    Army ROTC scholarships provide monthly living allowances for each school year. You can earn certain amounts depending on your level in the Army ROTC curriculum:

    • 1st year – $300 per month
    • 2nd year – $350 per month
    • 3rd year – $450 per month
    • 4th year – $500 per month
    The scholarship process is centralized at Cadet Command. Typically there are usually three boards held annually (October, December/January, and March). Interviews are conducted at a local Army ROTC program or school of choice prior to being eligible for selection.

    Return to Top

    Campus Based
    Campus based scholarships are equally competitive to the ones awarded at the National Scholarship level as well as limited. Depending on funding, we can award 4, 3, or 2 year campus based scholarships. Interested Cadets must meet strict qualification standards and compete against many other qualified Cadets. The minimum eligibility requirements for an on-campus scholarship includes:

    • Cadets must compete in the campus board process (conduct a scholarship interview)
    • Cadets must be enrolled in Army ROTC for at least one semester
    • Students must have a college 2.5 cumulative GPA or higher
    • Must become medically qualified
    • Students must be a U.S. citizen and cannot have dual citizenship
    • No civil convictions or drug use (may be waived)
    • Must past the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT)
    • Cadets must be under 31 years of age at time of commissioning
    Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty Scholarships
    This program consists of three types of GRFD (Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty) Scholarships: GRFD Dedicated ARNG (Army National Guard) Scholarship, GRFD Dedicated USAR (US Army Reserves) Scholarship, and GRFD Scholarships where the cadet can assess into either the NG or USAR.

    This program allows individuals to be on scholarship, provide guaranteed service in the ARNG or USAR and requires the student to participate in the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP).

    GRFD Scholarship recipients may not request conversion of or revocation of their GRFD Scholarship contracts.

    Scholarship money can be used for either Room and Board or Tuition and Fees. If Scholarship money is used towards Room and Board, Federal (in addition if applicable State, re: ARNG) Tuition Assistance can be used in conjunction with Scholarship money to pay for tuition. Room and Board amounts are taxable monies paid directly to the Cadet and are determined by an average or aggregate of the area. If Scholarship money is used for Tuition and Fees, then Federal/State Tuition Assistance cannot be used for Room and Board.

    Return to Top

    SMP Program
    The Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP) is an officer training program which allows non-scholarship contracted cadets and current enlisted soldiers within the Army National Guard (ARNG) and United States Army Reserve to simultaneously participate in the ROTC program and to be mentored by officers one weekend a month and annual training during the summer.

    The intent of the Simultaneous Membership Program is to increase officer accessions into the National Guard and the Army Reserve by allowing enlisted soldiers to earn their commission through ROTC while shadowing Army Officers in leadership positions during Guard or Reserve unit drills. By participating in the SMP program, does not preclude you from accessing on active duty when you commission.

    Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty Scholarships.
    This program consists of three types of GRFD (Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty) Scholarships: GRFD Dedicated ARNG (Army National Guard) Scholarship, GRFD Dedicated USAR (US Army Reserves) Scholarship, and GRFD Scholarships where the cadet can assess into either the NG or USAR.

    This program allows individuals to be on scholarship, provide guaranteed service in the ARNG or USAR and requires the student to participate in the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP).

    GRFD Scholarship recipients may not request conversion of or revocation of their GRFD Scholarship contracts.

    Cadets who are an Army ROTC SMP will receive:

    1. Up to $4,000 per year through the Federal Tuition Assistance (NOTE: Student must be fully MOS qualified for one full year prior to applying for Federal TA);
    2. Once contracted with the ROTC (need minimum of 30 credit hours to contract), drill pay in the grade of SGT E5 ($255/month);
    3. SMP non-scholarship contracted cadets who have completed Basic Training can receive State Tuition Assistance through VSAC (up to $6,500 per school year)
    4. SMP non-scholarship contracted cadets who have completed Basic and Advanced Individual Training (AIT) qualify to receive the Montgomery GI Bill® Selective Reserve (Chapter 1606/1607) ($355/month) and Montgomery GI Bill Kicker ($250/month);
    5. SMP students also receive monthly stipend of up to $500 per month ($350/month for a sophomore, $450/month for a junior; and $500/month for a senior)
    The Simultaneous Membership Program is available to any sophomores, or to transfer students from community colleges or other universities, but must be considered an academic sophomore.

    As a freshmen Cadets here at Norwich, you’ll have the opportunity to enlist in the Vermont National Guard or the Army Reserve and go to training between the summer of your freshmen and sophomore year. While taking advantage of this opportunity, you’ll gain not only soldier skills you can apply to developing your leadership style, you’ll start accumulating time in service. Cadets who have 2-3 years of enlisted time prior to commissioning, typically make $750 a month more than their peers without this experience.

    Note that contracted SMP Cadets are non-deployable.
     

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