Does every MOC and Rep ...

Discussion in 'Nominations' started by 34KING18, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. 34KING18

    34KING18 Member

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    1.) Does every MOC and Rep get at least one candidate that is offered an appointment every year? Are the Academies required to have at least one student from every MOC or Rep?

    2.) How come some Rep's will give two nominations ex) 1 to WP and 1 to USAFA?

    3.) If you don't get chosen for you first nomination choice and you receive your second, is their any significance to this? Maybe you had a better chance to get appointment at second school?

    Thanks
     
  2. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

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    No -- some MOCs do not put forward any candidates. Some MOCs have no available slots.

    Some districts and some states are not as competitive as others. For instance, in VA, the Senators and MOCs from NoVa usually coordinate so there are no duplicate nominations. The VA senators and NoVa MOCs also require the candidate to select their #1 SA. Seldom if ever does the VA Senator or NoVa MOC consider the 2nd or third SA choice.

    Possibly -- MOC may also not have a slot available at your #1 SA choice. There may also be other reasons
     
  3. 34KING18

    34KING18 Member

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    Thank you
     
  4. 2020HD

    2020HD Member

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    To add to Falcon's correct reply, with respect to your first question:
    Consider that each MOC can have up to five midshipmen/cadets at each SA at one time. These five can be spread out among the four classes as the MOC sees fit. Generally, each MOC has one mid/cadet for three class years “slotted” (or “charged”) to that MOC and two mids/cadets in one class year. When one of those mids/cadets graduates or otherwise leaves the SA, a spot opens up for the next year. Every so often, the MOC will have 2 slots in a year for a SA. And, unfortunately, some MOCs “mismanage” their slots leaving no noms for a particular year. Each MOC can nominate up to 10 candidates for each available slot that year. So, if the MOC has one opening, he/she can nominate 10 people; if this is a year with two openings, the MOC can nominate a total of 20 people – 10 for each of the two slots.
    But just because they have an open slot, and they nominate ten applicants for that one spot, does not mean the Service Academy needs to take any of them. That is, unless the MOC uses the “Principal Nominee" method(s)... in this case the MOC makes one candidate his/her “principal nominee.” This means that, if that candidate is fully qualified, the SA MUST offer him/her an appointment.
    Take a look at http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?threads/nominations-faq.33450/ for more detail than I pasted here.

    To your number 3, I would not extrapolate that just because your MOC's committee nominated you for one SA and not another that perhaps the SA's would also see it that way. They are completely unrelated processes and there is generally little coordination between your MOC and the SA (except in some LOA scenarios, where the MOC is informed of the LOA by the SA).
     
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  5. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    The "principal nominee" comment is wrong or out of context as it contradicts the last sentence. To clarify, if the MOC has an open slot, nominates 10 applicants, the SA must accept one of the fully qualified nominees. The nomination method determines which qualified applicant gets the appointment.
     
  6. 2020HD

    2020HD Member

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    Thank you, that's a fair clarification. I purposefully avoided the term " fully qualified" in that sentence because I meant to address the OP's first question and illustrate that in fact there is a scenario where none of a MOC's nominees get an appointment, even if they have an open slot. Probably a bit too nuanced of a reply.
    To your point, that scenario would not occur if at least one of the nominees was fully qualified.
     

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