does scholarshp guarantee active duty?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by paco45acp, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. paco45acp

    paco45acp New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, I'm an advanced designee recipient of a 3 year Army ROTC scholarship. I don't want to sound "entitled" or anything, but are scholarship recipients guaranteed active duty?

    Ok I doubt you're "guaranteed" beyond a reasonable doubt, but shouldn't they be more likely? I mean, would the Army really pay 3 years full tuition (I'm going to a private school, so lots of money here) to have someone end up in the reserves or national guard? I'm not trying to sound arrogant or anything I'm genuinely curious.

    I'm more than willing to work for a competitive active duty spot (Was fully qualified but got denied from West Point this year, so I feel like I'm pretty committed), but I was just wondering if the Army factored in someone who worked hard on a scholarship vs. someone who just signs up for the class because its cool or something like that.
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    No, is your short answer.

    I have to say I laughed at your last statement. someone who just signs up for the class because its cool or something like that.

    I don't know one 18 yo in college that would do ROTC, i.e. PT at O'dark thirty because it was cool or something like that.

    I think the avg student who is curious about a military career will quickly drop ROTC once they realize it requires a lot of time on top of academics. This is why you see a higher percentage rate of cadets dropping out in the 1st 2 yrs compared the last 2 yrs.
     
  3. Packer

    Packer Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,877
    Likes Received:
    5
    Scholarship status plays no role in determining your OMS score which will dictate active duty option or reserves. The army has made a bet on you but they are more than willing to cut their losses if they see their bet was wrong. Go work hard.
     
  4. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes Received:
    312
    Packer is correct. Not only can the Army cut their losses if they made a bad bet on you, they can also make you ante up ex post facto for their tuition outlay. Furthermore,since many, perhaps the majority, of your classmates are not on scholarship, you would want to set a good example.
     
  5. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,541
    Likes Received:
    842
    The scholarship does not guarantee an Active Duty spot, it does however afford you some opportunities toward that goal. The fact that your tuition is paid and you receive your stipend starting the second year helps to greatly off set the cost of school. This allows you to focus on school and ROTC without the distraction of having to work several hours a week to help pay for school, or spending a weekend a month at Drill. The need to work over the summer is not as great so you can take advantage of summer training if available. Not having to work an extra job during the school year leaves you time to be involved in school activities outside of ROTC, activities that could help you on your OMS.

    Of course all these opportunities don't mean much if the extra time is spent partying of just wasting the extra time you have. Work hard and use that time wisely and the benefit is there.

    The only other benefit of the scholarship is that you will contract the beginning of your sophomore year. Keep your nose clean, meet the contract requirements, pass LDAC, and you will commission when you graduate. Whether you commission Active or Reserves depends on how well you do and the needs of the Army.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    Different aspect than Jcleppe's regarding scholarship cadets.

    Scholarship cadets know to keep their scholarship they need a certain cgpa. Many cadets need the scholarship to attend their dream college financially, knowing that fact they will strive harder to keep the gpa above the ROTC min.

    Here's the thing; there will also be ROTC cadets on merit scholarship from the college, but not on ROTC scholarships. Traditionally college merit requires a higher cgpa than ROTC. That cgpa is going to be placed into your OML equation. You can be AROTC scholarship, but the AROTC Cadet merit college scholarship non-ROTC scholarship cadet can actually rank higher because your cgpa is lower.

    Think of it this way. Come Fall semester the slate is wiped clean, ROTC scholarships are considered "blind/masked" nobody cares if you have one. Cadets don't even talk about it.
     
  7. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,541
    Likes Received:
    842
    Pima makes a great point about the cadets on Merit scholarships and the GPA. GPA is 40% of your OMS score, meeting just the ROTC minimums will get you commissioned, it won't get you Active Duty.

    Pima is correct that nobody really cares if you are on scholarship, SMP, or a non scholarship cadet, how you perform is what is important. There is one difference though, in AROTC the "Contract" is more important then the scholarship. A cadet cannot attend summer training if they are not contracted. The time most cadets go to summer training such as Airborne or Air Assault is during the summer after your sophomore year. The only cadets that will be contracted their sophomore year will be scholarship and possibly SMP cadets. This is where the battalion does care whether you are scholarship or not. Having a 3 yr AD scholarship will mean you will be contracted your sophomore year providing you meet the requirements and will eligible for summer training if available. Non scholarship cadets not doing SMP will not contract until their junior year.
     
  8. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,378
    Likes Received:
    338
    You'd be surprised of people that sign up for ROTC class. They don't go to PT or usually take the lab, but they're are people who sign up for a MILS class to take it. Most do it not realizing what the course is because, if I remember correctly, MSI class is labeled as Rappeling and Outdoor Fieldcraft (or something similar). We've had people sign up thinking it was an actual Rappeling course. They usually end up disappointed.
     
  9. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1,699
    Likes Received:
    451
    http://goldenknightbattalion.wordpress.com/2010/08/06/the-contract/

    Take a look at the contract...specifically paragraph 4...I'm guessing this may be the first time you have seen it. If you read it carefully you will see that you are agreeing to accept a commission, with no guarantee which component you will serve in. Pretty simple agreement.

    I've seen plenty of students sign up for the class because they think it's cool, and many of them get Active Duty. I have also seen many 4 year scholarship winners get put into the Guard or Reserves. Control what you can (participation, GPA, PT) and don't get distracted by the things you can't. Too easy.
     
  10. dlee96

    dlee96 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    1
    No, in Black Hawk Down (book, not film) the author mentions a Ranger who did ROTC but was assigned as a reserve desk clerk because there were so many active duty 2nd lieutenants. It basically depends on the number of 2nd lieutenants on active duty
     
  11. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Messages:
    1,601
    Likes Received:
    35
    Well said.

    Yes, all the contract says is that if you complete the program, you will get a commission - no mention of type of commission (AD or reserve).

    It does say that if you complete your first year (including not only grade requirements and participation in unit activities and PT and other standards) and have the endorsement of your PMS (you've got to sell your cadre on the fact that you can lead people) that you will receive a scholarship, stipend, and book money for the remaining time in ROTC (subject to the same rules that got you through the first year, of course).

    That being said, Clarkson's mention of scholarship recipients who end up in reserves speaks to the degree that the cadet put effort into the program. Those who perform best across all portions of the requirements will get AD.

    There are a few other benefits of being contracted (on scholarship in the first 2 years) including access to summer programs and higher priority on some training opportunities during the academic year. Access to these opportunities can help a cadet improve their OML standing within their unit which in turn can help their OML score for AD selection. Nothing that guarantees a better outcome, but opportunities are what you make of them.
     
  12. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,234
    Likes Received:
    5
    I think you are confusing scholarship with contracted. You can be non-scholarship and still just as competitive for active duty because you are contracted, meaning you have an obligation for certain number of years. Also, plenty of people who could have gone active (me included) choose NG/reserves because of different goals so it isn't place where the all "bad" officers are assigned.

    As a side note I never new anyone who signed up because it was cool and if they did that idea of coolness fades fast, especially around the third year ;)
     
  13. Armydude2012

    Armydude2012 LT

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you are awarded a 4 year scholarship your contract states tht you are enlisted I the reserves you are non deployable. You are not guaranteed active duty, only west pointers and senior military college (VMI, Citadel, and others) are out right given active duty provided their commander authorizes that they are competent. I competed for my active duty commission. Although I accessed active duty infantry I am technically still in the reserves until I PCS to Ft. Benning.
     

Share This Page