Does State of Residence Matter?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by rotcmom2015, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. rotcmom2015

    rotcmom2015 New Member

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    Is the state of residence a consideration when evaluating whether a candidate will receive a scholarship? In other words, is there a certain amount of scholarships designated for each state?
     
  2. rocatlin

    rocatlin Member

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    Each NROTC can have a certain # of slots available depending upon accession goals. However, the boards are at a national level. It's not like the service academy process where US Senators and Reps have a certain # of openings per state.

    Someone from another state can very well get NROTC slots out of state.

    I would imagine the only possible benefit from being "in state" is actually after selection and when being actually assigned a school. Selection and school assignments are two separate parts in the process. Again, that really depends on whether or not your "state" school is the first one on the list -- and really that may be a wash since NSTC tries to give out first choices until gone.
     
  3. rotcmom2015

    rotcmom2015 New Member

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    I was thinking more along the lines of the award-winners per state, not where they choose to attend college. So will candidates from states with few applicants have a higher chance of earning a scholarship than the states with hundreds of applicants?
     
  4. rocatlin

    rocatlin Member

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    Not entirely sure if it's on the Navy side. From the Marine Option side, they do divide the Marine Recruiting areas into districts and I believe the districts have x number of "slots".

    All in all, however, I don't think states with a fewer # of applicants have any greater chances. It's really based on how competitive the individual applicant is against peers. Again, it's more national than state driven.
     

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