Dual citizenship

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Elise098, Oct 6, 2016.

  1. Elise098

    Elise098 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Heyy
    I am currently highly considering applying to USNA however I have dual citizenship, Australian and American. From what I have read, there are issues that arise with loyalty (correct me if I am wrong) to America and so would I be required to give up my Australian citizenship?

    Would it be worth it giving up my dual citizenship considering I've grown up in Australia? (I know the decision is completely up to me but I'd like to hear others opinions). It would be amazing if I got the opportunity to attend the naval academy and it's been my dream for as long as I can remember but I guess I'm really scared to give it up.

    Thanks for reading my dilemmas :)
     
  2. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,852
    Likes Received:
    342
    Unless the laws have changed in recent years, you will be required to renounce your Australian citizenship to your embassy prior to acceptance to any SA.

    I am NOT the expert here; you'd have to speak with an admissions counselor for the definitive answer. I'm just going on past experience.

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
    murfthesurf likes this.
  3. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,338
    Likes Received:
    1,802
    Search this USNA forum using "dual citizenship." You will see several posts from others in your position.

    Read every page, dropdown and link on the USNA.edu site. I believe I have seen where it mentions a security clearance cannot be issued until passports are surrendered and citizenships given up.

    The best answer will come from the primary source, the USNA Admissions Office.
     
    murfthesurf likes this.
  4. Elise098

    Elise098 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Okay, thanks guys!
     
  5. MMA19kid

    MMA19kid Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2015
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    46
    I personally know a West Point cadet with dual citizenship. The reason that it would be beneficial to renounce your citizenship is that you need a "Secret" clearance, issued by the DoD/OPM. Possessing a foreign passport is (generally) not allowed.

    The OPM conducts an investigation into whether you are suitable for a clearance. If that citizenship was obtained automatically through birth in the country/parents, that is generally okay although its a longer process to obtain clearance.

    Renouncing your citizenship would make the process easier, that's for sure. But it's not "required".
     
  6. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,801
    Likes Received:
    443
    One could argue that it is not required, but it is required to obtain SECRET clearance. Commissioned officers are required to have SECRET clearance or higher. So I don't see how someone that wants to attend a service academy and not renounce his or her foreign citizenship (exception is foreign exchange cadets). You will have to "renounce" your foreign citizenship if you want to become an officer in the U.S. military. Some countries won't allow you to officially renounce their citizenship, so do the research and there is a work around. Your security clearance investigation paperwork will be ask about foreign citizenship and foreign passport, don't hide it, you will get caught. If you answered yes and yes, eventually you will be contacted by a security official and asked to renounce your foreign citizenship (if the country doesn't allow you to officially renounce their citizenship, you will be asked to sign statement renouncing your foreign citizenship) and invalidate your passport. If you insist on keeping your foreign passport or using it until the last possible minute, it could be a reason for your security clearance to be denied. One possible explanation of using a foreign passport easier access to certain countries or hiding foreign travel.

    The Midshipman Oath of Office is

    HAVING BEEN APPOINTED A MIDSHIPMAN IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY, DO YOU SOLEMNLY SWEAR (OR AFFIRM) THAT YOU WILL SUPPORT AND DEFEND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES AGAINST ALL ENEMIES, FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC; THAT YOU WILL BEAR TRUE FAITH AND ALLEGIANCE TO THE SAME; THAT YOU TAKE THIS OBLIGATION FREELY, WITHOUT ANY MENTAL RESERVATION OR PURPOSE OF EVASION; AND THAT YOU WILL WELL AND FAITHFULLY DISCHARGE THE DUTIES OF THE OFFICE ON WHICH YOU ARE ABOUT TO ENTER, SO HELP YOU GOD.

    If someone wants to argue that a person can "bear true faith and allegiance to [the Constitution of the United States]" with dual citizenship, I respectively disagree.
     
    ktnatalk likes this.
  7. cb7893

    cb7893 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,051
    Likes Received:
    377
    s
    First, you need to ask yourself what every other applicant has to ask him/herself, "Do you really want to become an American Naval/Military Officer?" You can eat all the vegemite sandwiches you want, but at some point you will have to affirm to your Aussie family members and "mates" that you renounce your Australian citizenship. You will lose a lot of visa free travel having to use the US rather than the Aussie passport. Opportunities for overseas employment will also be limited by losing the Aussie citizenship.

    Second, heed Captain MJ's advice and contact USNA admissions. It is their job to answer your questions. They can advise as to how best to and when to renounce the citizenship, if in fact, you choose to go that route.

    Third, this was our DSs' dilemma. I am born and raised American. DW was born and raised in a formerly communist, now NATO/EU member country. Late in DS #1's high school years, we decided to get him and DS #2 passports from Mom's country. EU passport is golden, particularly in combo with the US. Just ask the HR department of any multi national company.

    Since the DS's were born in the US they first had to acquire citizenship in Mom's country. We started that process. Shortly thereafter, DS #1 decided he wanted to apply for an AROTC scholarship. When the scholarship was awarded, we abandoned the process for DS#1 knowing that he could not become an Officer as a dual national. He never became a citizen of Mom's country.

    We continued the process for DS#2 to the point of getting him a second passport. In the meanwhile, he applied for and received a 4 yr NROTC scholarship to his dream school, only to be medically DQed. Had he renounced the citizenship before being DQed, he would have lost the passport for good. He is in his fourth year of MechE, interning at this moment at Goddard Space fight center (no problem with Dual National there). The Professor he worked for at his university moved back to Germany. If DS#2 decides to do grad school or seek employment in Germany, like with Siemens, he will have the same opportunities available other 22 year olds from EU countries.

    I am sure there will be a number of appeals to your patriotism and honor and tell you to make up your mind right now. They are correct in urging you to resolve in your own mind if you really want to become a US Military Officer. There many good reasons to have two passports and you shouldn't give one up unless you have to. I would hold on the Aussie as long as you can, while being completely open with USNA and being willing to do as they tell you to do.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2016
  8. Elise098

    Elise098 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wow, this has helped me ALOT. I'll be certainly doing more research to know all my options.

    Thank you!!!
     

Share This Page