Eagle scout

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by TJWJAG50, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. TJWJAG50

    TJWJAG50 Member

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    All,

    Am interested in getting an idea of how important or unimportant being an Eagle Scout is? I know the USNA does not look at just one thing, but the whole person, including class ranking, GPA, standardized test score, athletics, extracurricular activities and other factors, but how much weight is given to having accomplished the rank of Eagle Scout?

    Thanks.
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I can't tell you how much it's weighted, perhaps others can. I can tell you it ain't nothing and every little bit helps.
     
  3. LLL

    LLL Member

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    Quantitatively - I can't put a number on it.

    Qualitatively - Shows leadership, as all Eagles have had to serve in leadership throughout the rank advancements and also in the Eagle Scout Leadership Project. Provides numerous examples of participation in community service projects. Provides a body of work in an endeavor that takes years to accomplish through the process of "eating the elephant one bite at a time," a skill that will be beneficial at a service academy, a career in the military, and life in general.
     
  4. Shawn

    Shawn Member

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    Eagle Scouts have the highest retention rate out of all other demographics at USNA (i.e. honor societies, JrROTC, HS varsity sports, boys state, etc.) Food for thought.

    To echo what LLL said, you can't put a value on Eagle Scout. Sure, admissions weighs it somehow in the application process. I doubt anyone on this forum knows its numerical value. I can promise you, though, it's far from "unimportant".
     
  5. matthewper35

    matthewper35 Member

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    In my personal experience in applying to West Point I did feel that I was at a disadvantage! Fortunately I just received my LOA for USMAPS and I have never done Boy Scouts a day in my life. I was varsity for more than 3 sports and captain for 3 of them. My SAT is a 1500 but my GPA is 3.8/4.0. Many things go into the Application process. Don't overobsess about one minor thing that isn't mandatory for an acceptance to a service academy. This is just my opinion. Im sure that being an Eagle Scout can give you an advantage. Again, in my opinion, if you are meant to be there I'm sure the admissions department will see that and make a judgement.
     
  6. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    One of the favorite questions in interviews, be they for MOC noms or BGO is: "Tell me of a time when you initiated a project and lead it from conceptualization through completion. What obstacles did you encounter and how did you work through them. What did you learn about leading/directing others (peers), and what is your most effective leadership style and why?" Most Eagles know very well how to answer those questions, and do so very well. As noted above, it may not be a huge advantage, but it is an advantage - take it for what it's worth.

    About this time in the selection cycle, there are many candidates wishing they had it, especially if it tips the scales in their favor.
     
  7. majortheta

    majortheta Member

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    As an Eagle Scout, I believe going through scouting is worth more than the benefits of recognition. I applied to USNA last year, was an Eagle Scout then, but didn't get in. I suspect my academics were to blame. I got in this year. Who knows. But I'm better off being an Eagle Scout. Even if Eagle Scouts weren't recognized like they are, I'm still very thankful for the opportunity to be in a good Troop.
     

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