Early Commissioning Program

Discussion in 'Publicly and Privately Funded Military Colleges' started by 34KING18, Aug 27, 2015.

  1. 34KING18

    34KING18 Member

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    Hi guys. Quick question. Can someone explain to me how the early commissioning program works? I know you do 2 years at a school and are commissioned but do you have to do 2 more years or can you just stop with your associates? Also, what are the schools that actually have the early commissioning program? Thank you
     
  2. glen

    glen Member

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    I don't know a lot - but pretty easy to find info on line. What I noted in one article is that with the draw down in the military - the program may be limited in the future, so be careful. Here is some info found on line:


    "Throughout the 1980s, the Early Commissioning Program played a major role in officer production. In some years, ECP officers constituted over 60 percent of all ROTC second lieutenants. The program is a major financial incentive for students who could receive their commissions early and serve as officers while still attending college. In 1984, the California Guard received 95 percent (74 of 78) of its ROTC lieutenants from the ECP program.[


    The Army Reserve had a similar experience.

    In 1991, the downsizing of the Army reduced officer production requirements, leading to the reduction of the Early Commission Program to the Military junior colleges affiliated with the Army ROTC program. However, with the United States’ involvement in continuing military action in Iraq and Afghanistan, the number of ECP slots is again being increased.

    As of 2014 the option for contracted ECP cadets to compete for active duty is potentially being revoked.


    In the United States, the Early Commissioning Program allows graduates of one of the country's five military junior colleges to become commissioned officers in the armed forces reserve in two years, instead of the usual four. The students must still go on to complete a bachelor's degree before serving as regular officers on active duty. The program is a major financial incentive for students to receive their commissions early and serve as officers while still attending college and gaining service time for promotions and retirement.


    Early Commissioning Program Requirements[edit]

    Program benefits (subject to change)[edit]

    • Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in two years.

    • Begin earning service time toward promotions and retirement following sophomore year in college.

    • Paid $450 per month during first year, $500 per month during the second year while enrolled

    • Paid as a Cadet/E-5 in the Reserves or National Guard if enrolled in SMP ($241.88 per month)

    • Uniform allowance of $2,724

    • Book allowance of $1200 (payable $600 per semester)

    Program obligations[edit]

    • Complete undergraduate degree within 36 months of graduation

    • Serve a total of eight years in Reserves or National Guard or a combination of active duty and reserves equal to eight years, beginning on the day you are commissioned as a Second Lieutenant.
     
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  3. Physicsguru

    Physicsguru Member

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    ECP is done at the five MJCs: Georgia Military College, Marion Military Institute (Alabama), New Mexico Military Institute, Valley Forge Military (PA), and Wentworth Military Academy (MO).

    If you do not complete the Bachelor's degree in the time frame, they don't take away your commission, but you are not promotable and likely won't be retained after obligated service completion. Also, the commission is in either a National Guard unit or Army Reserve. Transfer to the active army is not guaranteed.
     
  4. QA1517

    QA1517 Member

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    If you do not complete your degree in time you will be in breach of your contract and will be dismissed and will have to repay money if you accepted any scholarship money. You cannot attend BOLC until you get your degree. I cannot imagine that they would let you serve out your time as an 8 yr 2nd LT.
     
  5. 34KING18

    34KING18 Member

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    Do you need to receive a scholarship to commission?
     
  6. Cluelessparent

    Cluelessparent Member

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    NO..... Plenty folks don't get scholarships... and scholarships become more competitive every year with military cut backs.If you are able to get a contract while in undergrad school, usually entering your Junior year, you will be eligible for a stipend etc.

    Have heard of several graduating and then commissioning and having grad schools paid for, Recently a young lady going to Vet school and another Med school. Not sure of the particulars of details of post grad school paybacks or when you attend....
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2015
  7. glen

    glen Member

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    Gluelessparent - I also know of a Citadel grad back 7 or 8 years ago who received an Army scholarship on graduating and attended law school - with a commitment to go into either JAG or Quarter Master Corps. But doubt this would happen today other than for medical or perhaps vet school students
     
  8. Cluelessparent

    Cluelessparent Member

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    Glenn...I am not quite as clueless as I was when I first joined the forum, so perhaps Gluelessparent would be better :)

    Yea Vet school sometimes happens. Just talked to a parent teo weeks ago whose DD signed the line for Vet school.
     

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