Electrical Engineering

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by lukeS, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. lukeS

    lukeS Member

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    I was wondering anyone who has worked in the military and/or civilian as an electrical engineer, could just give me a description of what you do. I'm sure that all electrical engineering jobs are not the same, but if someone could just provide an example, I would appreciate it.
     
  2. lukeS

    lukeS Member

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    Maybe there is somone out there who knows a thing or two about it, but hasn't worked in it. If this is you, I would still appreciate some feedback.
     
  3. 2012mom?

    2012mom? Member

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    Hi Luke,

    I worked for ~12 years as a Navy civilian electronics engineer. There are a number of Navy facilities that have jobs for military Engineering Duty Officers (EDOs) and civilian engineers. Our facility was involved in testing of many Navy and MC subsystems. Sometimes we developed tests ourselves, but many times we worked with system and subsystem contractors to make sure that they provided high quality testing for the equipment they sold to the Navy. I know that's a pretty general statement, but there are so many different types of equipment that it's hard to be more specific.

    Other Navy facilities have engineers who work on other areas. For instance, some Navy engineers work on developing system requirements to allow the Navy to develop and buy new equipment. Believe it or not, it takes a lot of engineering studies to determine just what types of systems the Navy/MC should buy, and how to ask commercial companies to do detailed designs. Here's an example. Let's say that you want to buy a GPS receiver. that's easy, right? Well, it wasn't easy for Navy engineers to design the requirements for how many satellites would be needed, how they would be positioned in space, how signals would be transmitted, and so forth. Still, they succeeded. Or, since you're on this site, you've probably heard of the Aegis weapons system. Navy engineers revolutionized how sailors "fight their ship" by imagining an entire combat system that was networked together. Years ago, every individual piece of equipment (sonar, communications gear, etc) used to be completely stand-alone, and data couldn't be transferred automatically from one piece of equipment to another.

    I hope this helps.
     

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