Engineering in the Coast Guard

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by a.olson, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. a.olson

    a.olson Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey! I was just accepted to the Coast Guard Academy this week. I have also applied to the Air Force Academy (still waiting for a response). I want to earn a mechanical engineering degree and was thinking about specializing in areospace engineering. I was wondering if anyone could tell me a bit more about what an engineering career would be like in the coast guard; what kind of projects I may work on, where would I be stationed (ship, land etc.),and possibilities for advancement. I am not particularly fond of the idea of living on a ship for months at a time. That is one of my primary concerns about the coast guard, if anyone has some advice or input on that it would be much appreciated.
     
  2. jjohnson55

    jjohnson55 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2010
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0
    why did you apply?

    "I want to earn a mechanical engineering degree and was thinking about specializing in areospace engineering"

    And you applied to the Coast Guard Academy....why?
     
  3. shellz

    shellz Parent

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Messages:
    910
    Likes Received:
    75
    Learn to love the water...it is the CG after all. :wink:

    Good luck with USAFA. Sounds like a better fit for you.
     
  4. riverdale

    riverdale Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0
    ^This.

    (and :bang:)
     
  5. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    Easy now guys...you're forgetting that we have aircraft too. There are many people here who are interested in getting a masters degree in aeronautical engineering (myself included) because they want to go the pilot route.

    To the OP: As far as engineering goes, we have four majors here at the academy: Electrical, Mechanical, Civil, and Naval Architecture. I'm a EE.

    Engineering in the fleet (especially on cutters) is waaay different than engineering you learn in school. cutter engineering is about maintenance, not design. The aviation side of the coast guard has an engineering branch as well, with the aviation engineering officer overseeing the maintenance and logistics of the aircraft. We also have electrical and civil engineering support units.

    Now, if you want to just design you'd probably be better off going to a civilian engineering school or 5 and diving. Military officers aren't involved in the design process of military systems. That's for civilian contractors.

    A little off topic, but I would argue that engineers are more likely to 5 and dive because we have a lot more earning potential in the civilian world than our friends in the other majors.
     
  6. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    5
    I don't know, a management degree on Wall Street in the hands of the right person/company can have unlimited earning potential. :wink:
     
  7. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,751
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    When I want a toilet made, I can always hope to find an engineer, especially a toad, to make one. My old roommate and best friend was good at that.
     
  8. RevenueCutterService

    RevenueCutterService Revenue Cutter Academy

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2011
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Many people who want to go into aerospace engineering become Naval Architect/Marine Engineering majors. Boats and planes aren't that dissimilar, and the Coast Guard has a grad school program that will send you to MIT for a dual masters in Naval Architecture and Aerospace Engineering. I personally know three officers who have completed this program. It's totally possible.
     
  9. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    meh. The quantitative analysis necessary for Wall Street finances is better suited to those who major in Operations Research or Electrical Engineering. The beauty of a technical degree is that you can do anything that humanities/business majors can do. :wink:
     
  10. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,751
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    Except write, speak clearly or get girls....
     
  11. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    5
    :lolatyou: Rimshot
     
  12. USCGA13STN

    USCGA13STN Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2010
    Messages:
    304
    Likes Received:
    13
    I mean, you want to talk about getting girls... MES is where it's at. What girl doesn't like cute little sea animals? :shake:
     
  13. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    Not true at all. I scored an 800 on the English part of the SAT and was in the Honors English class here at the Academy. The lowest grade I've ever gotten on a paper here was a B.

    As for getting girls I know a lot of socially retarded government majors :wink:
     
  14. trackandfield08

    trackandfield08 USCGA 2014

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    Messages:
    476
    Likes Received:
    84
    English is one thing....writing political science papers is completely different. And are you sure about that Sam? Because if we did a comparative analysis...well let's just say we both know that Government majors are communicators...engineers, well...not so much. :wink:

    Besides, if I wanted to, I could be an engineering major. But its dead boring to me so I decided not too. Its all about choices and what you are truly interested in. The Coast Guard needs both a technical and non-technical way of looking at things. That's why we have different majors as opposed to about 50 years ago when everyone graduated an engineer.
     
  15. USCGA13STN

    USCGA13STN Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2010
    Messages:
    304
    Likes Received:
    13
    Lets just leave it that there are a lot of socially stunted people at the academy... period. Everyone has them in their class. :wink:
     
  16. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    You're right T&F about a lot of engineers not being good communicators. I think that's one of the biggest things that I bring to the engineering table...the ability to speak and write clearly and get the idea across so others can understand it.

    I think I would be doing better academically if I was a non-engineering major, but that's because my strengths lie in reading and writing and not math based courses. I do think it's important to improve your weak areas though, and I do like learning how things work. For instance, how a cellphone works.

    It does take all types to make it work :thumb:
     
  17. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,751
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    One thing I think we can all agree on, engineers are good at sleeping in weird places at CGA....
     
  18. shellz

    shellz Parent

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Messages:
    910
    Likes Received:
    75
    All this and you're humble too! :wink:
     
  19. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    haha my strongest trait
     
  20. USCGA13STN

    USCGA13STN Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2010
    Messages:
    304
    Likes Received:
    13
    Every cadet has found... odd places to sleep at the Academy.


    Objee's old Astronomy tower anyone?
     

Share This Page