enlisted or college to usna

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by DC1220, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. DC1220

    DC1220 Member

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    I'm stuck in a decision to either enlist into the marines for one or two years and apply through to the USNA or go to college for a year and apply through there..which do you prefer would be a better road to get into the academy... i would like to become a marine officer and anything helps.... thanks
     
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Long run? College.
     
  3. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Unquestionably - COLLEGE.
     
  4. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    A couple questions first.

    Are you a current senior in high school.

    If you are a senior, did you apply to the USNA for this year. Did you also apply for the Navy ROTC Marine Corps Option as well.

    I agree with the above posters, College will be the best path. If you choose to attend College you should sign up for the NROTC Marine Corps Option. This will be a great plan B if you do not receive an appointment to the USNA. You would already be in a program that will lead you to your goal of becoming a Marine Corps Officer. Going to College and participating in NROTC will be much better then enlisting, this would put you on a path toward a Marine Corps Commission from the start.

    If you are a junior in high school and are looking for options, make sure you apply for both the USNA and NROTC Marine Corps option, don't put all your eggs in one basket.
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    And short run? College. Preferably one that has an NROTC unit where you can enroll as a Marine Option college programmer. If that's not possible, then the answer is still college, followed by OCS or even PLC, if necessary, while in college. If you are intent on USNA then try to mimic their freshman course load while you're there. That will help demonstrate that you can handle the coursework at USNA. And should you not get into USNA you're already working your backup plan.

    If you think college would be a financial burden, then shoot for scholarships and aid. If those things don't come through for you or are not sufficient, you can always enlist then. Enlisting should not be the first option because getting into USNA via enlistment or even getting into MECEPS NROTC is a low probability path.

    EDIT: Cross posted with the amazing Jcleppe. He is absolutely correct as usual.
     
  6. DC1220

    DC1220 Member

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    yes I'm a senior, i don't really have the scores (SAT-1320 ACT-18 Retaking in November ACT in December) and no i didnt know If i shouldve apply for the academy, i have considered NROTC for a year or two and i have a 3.0 unweighted and 90 weighted Gpa..should i apply anyway for class of 2018 anyways and I'll go try for an NROTC scholarship
    i just thought of enlisted because some enlisted get in... but from the looks of it doesnt look like a good road
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2013
  7. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Here's the thing, USNA isn't easy to get into, but it's also not an easy school. If you got off and enlist in the Marine Corps, great, but the longer you stay away from the academic setting, the harder it will be to adjust to that unique college experience.

    I'm not saying it can't be done. I saw the movie "Annapolis" so I know Marines make the best cadre..... and I had prior service classmates too. But it's easy to go from one academic setting to another.

    Now if the college part isn't as important as the Marine Corps part, or you really want to enlist in the Marine Corps, that's a different story. But if the goal is being an officer, I think college is the best path, either to apply to USNA or go through NROTC.
     
  8. Dolphins2012

    Dolphins2012 Parent

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    I'll just pile on here - my current youngster said - as a generalization - "priors" (prior enlisted) mids struggle having been out of the classroom for too long, and many separate as a result. I know it would stink to pay for a year of college, but if it's an option, I'd agree with everyone else here - go and take classes you'll have to take plebe/youngster years (chemistry, calculus, physics, etc.).
     
  9. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    A few comments.

    1. The only way you're guaranteed not to get a scholarship is to not apply.

    2. My son's high school stats were similar to yours. Solid B student. 1320 SAT (exc. writing). His ACT was much better but some folks do well on one but not the other. He did not get a scholarship. He was determined to become a Marine Officer. (In fact he wanted to enlist like you at first but we dissuaded him and got him interested in NROTC). He enrolled as a college programmer. Last Dec. (his sophomore year) he won an in-school NROTC scholarship. He worked hard. Made Dean's list each semester. PFT scores are always near or at max. Leadership was excellent. So it's not easy, and I'm not saying YOU would get a scholarship. In fact only 11 in-school scholarships were awarded for Marine Options last Dec. Just want to point out it's possible for someone in your situation (based on academics anyway... many other things come into play like physical fitness, leadership, etc).
     
  10. DC1220

    DC1220 Member

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    does the academy take into what college you go to... like would i have a better chance at getting in from VMI or somewhere like UT
     
  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Just my opinion based on what I know of the process....
    They will take into account the rigor of the school, just like they do for high school. You MAY have a better chance if you attend a Senior Military College like VMI. This is because its a senior military college, not because its VMI. However, what's most important is your own performance. If you attend UT and do well grade wise, participate in ECs and intramural sports you will have a fair chance of getting in.
     
  12. Apgallozzi

    Apgallozzi Member

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    Hey. I went to USMMA out of hs then was enlisted for 2 years and now I'm at USNA so I am speaking from experience when I say...

    GO TO COLLEGE!

    USNA is great and you do not need to be a prior to be successful here. If you want to be an officer and seriously have the drive and capability to do so (which I am assuming you do) then go for it all man. And keep going til you make it. One of my classmates transferred from VMI and I have others that were in college for a year or two before (both rotc and not rotc). It all depends on the individual person. There isn't necessarily an ideal path to get here. Just do everything you can and one way or another you'll find out how to do what you have to to get here. Shoot, I'm as old as the firsties, this is my second plebe year, and I've been out in the Fleet but I'm here now and I love it.
     
  13. DC1220

    DC1220 Member

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    Would the academy also look at a program such as PLC for the marines for consideratiobor should I not do that?
     
  14. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I don't think enrolling in PLC is going to give you any special consideration when applying to an academy. Frankly, I'm not sure what your goal is. If you were enrolled in PLC then you are already on a path to commissioning. It sounds like your goal is to attend an academy. That's admirable, but ultimately, for everyone who attends an academy the real goal is commissioning. So why are you chasing your tail here? What is it that you're really after?
     
  15. DC1220

    DC1220 Member

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    i want to become a marine officer, i mean i really want to go to the academy, its been a long dream i've wanted...i haven't had the best high school experience, a lot happened... i currently hold a 2.9GPA or a 3.0 if you want to round( 90 weighted)...my current SAT scores are a 1320 and ACT is an 18, yeah i know horrendous i'm retaking in November the SAT and the ACT in december, the reason i asked the question of whether to go enlisted or to college is because i should give out a year and mature myself, because college is tough i know that, i know that the rigor of college is hard as heck, and i'm not the most organized person, but my desire has been to go to the Naval academy, so i don't know whether to take a year off and go see the world and mature a little more or go to college and try the best i can.
     
  16. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Look, college is "hard as heck" but the Naval Academy is college and a whole bunch of other crap that makes college a little harder.

    It may be better to get your feet wet in college and take those college classes, as opposed to having not so hot grades and school, and going out into a service (and not doing school work for a year) and then enter the academic rigor of USNA. The service won't prepare you for the area you seem to need the most work in, academics.

    Getting in is only half the battle, being successful in the classroom and graduating is what you REALLY want to do.
     
  17. DC1220

    DC1220 Member

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    would the academy look into someone who is going to a community college, like if a person went to a community college and they do good in the community college environment and a different person went to a four year does as well academically. who would they look at more
     
  18. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    They would look at the program you were in and how you did. I don't think they would prefer a 2.5 GPA at a 4-year college over a 4.0 at a community college. But you also have to consider the classes you'll take. GPA isn't everything; you also need to tackle challenging classes, and you'll need to do well.
     
  19. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    The Academy website is pretty clear on what a college student needs to do. Take a load of courses at a 4 year college that mimic the Plebe Year courses Calculus, chemistry with a lab, English, etc.---look them up--and the grades you get will speak for you to the Admissions Board. You also need to do the best you can on the ACT as the Academy uses that score to predict how well you will do with Academy academics. Anything less and your desirability is less. Remember, you are COMPETING with other candidates, not trying to do minimums.

    The sad truth is you are going to have to have to make up the academics in college that you coasted through in high school (and I would bet English was one of them). You can do it but you will need a ferocious desire and the action to follow it to get A's and B's in college. Good luck.
     
  20. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    USNA clearly prefers a 4-yr college. Most areas of the country have state-sponsored 4-yr colleges where in-state students can get decent financial aid. However, USNA also understands that a small number of people can only afford a community college. If it is a financial hardship, ensure that USNA is aware of that via your BGO and Regional Director.

    As for grades -- for the overwhelming majority -- a 2.5 at a 4-yr college isn't going to do it in terms of USNA. You really need to get mostly As with maybe a B here or there.
     

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