Enlisted (USMC Reserves) to USNA as Plan B

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by ChrisWilder07, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. ChrisWilder07

    ChrisWilder07 Member

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    I have searched the forums about going from enlisted to USNA, but I have a different situation. Allow me to explain:

    Here were my plans as of last week:
    - Plan A: USNA
    - Plan B: 4-year NROTC Scholarship
    - Plan C: Enlisting in the U.S. Marine Corps

    For Plan A, I have been deemed Triple Qualified, I have two nominations, but I have not received an appointment.

    For Plan B, my Marine Corps recruiter informed me yesterday that I was not awarded the 4-year NROTC Scholarship.

    For Plan C, as of last night, I began the enlistment process (into the reserves, not active duty) to have a back-up incase I am not appointed to USNA.

    My question is: Is enlisting into the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves for a year such a bad idea vs. going to college for a year and reapplying?

    Either way, I would reapply. My understanding is that the Academy's slots for enlisted men and women are never fully filled. Wouldn't this mean it would be easier for me to gain an appointment to USNA from enlisted (reserves) versus being a college applicant (NROTC, not on scholarship)?

    From the enlisted side, I scored extremely high on the practice ASVAB and would qualify for virtually all MOS's. I am more of a STEM-driven person so I would choose a technical MOS. The Marine Corps gives college credits for the training that everyone goes through, and the more technical the MOS, the more credits you receive.

    My theory/plan is..enlist in the Marine Corps Reserves if I am not appointed to USNA, go to Boot Camp, Marine Combat Training, and then my MOS School and gain college credits while doing so. I would also be re-applying to USNA during this time to gain acceptance to the Class of 2018. If USNA doesn't work out once again, I would take my credits from my training and apply for an NROTC scholarship again and go to Texas A&M and pursue a commission from one of the many commissioning programs through civilian colleges.

    I apologize for the long post, but I just wanted to see if any others are in the same situation or have been through this situation before or if you have any advice for me.

    I appreciate every bit of y'all's help.
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I don't feel qualified to comment on the viability of your plan other than this:
    1. Keep in mind that you must have fewer than 30 college credits when you apply for an NROTC 4 year scholarship.
    2. Another plan, perhaps lower down, you should consider is MECEP. I think Active Reserve Marines are eligible.
    3. You might get more insight on your plan C from your recruiter, but I also advise a trust but verify approach. Like everyone else in life, recruiters are not necessarily expert in all areas.

    Hope plan A comes through. There are a few of us on the forums, myself included, who think the NROTC scholarship is actually harder to get than an appointment to USNA so do not give up hope.
     
  3. lukepeoples

    lukepeoples Member

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    MECEP is only for commissioning through the Navy Nurse Corps. STA-21 would be the better bet, but STA-21 had only two people last year pick up, N/MC wide, competing with E6s with ten years in. I would NOT enlist to get into the naval academy. At any point, especially as a Marine, you can be activated and deploy.

    Do not use the enlisted military to go to the SAs unless you are aware and ready to serve overseas and possibly die for your country.

    It's a lot easier to go to community college for a year and work full time, get good grades and apply again, or go NROTC. Enlisting isn't just an easy way in, it is a commitment that you are making to serve for x number of years. Not a ticket to a service academy.

    Plan C is disrespectful and a bad idea.
     
  4. Grad/Dad

    Grad/Dad Member

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    You probably know this already but ROTC scholarships are school specific. Which is why they can sometimes be more competitive. I would think that a Scholarship to somewhere like Texas A&M would be highly competitive but a NROTC to somewhere like Idaho or Iowa probably much less so.
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Pardon my rudeness but that is the most blatantly incorrect statement I have ever seen on these forums. If you don't know what you're speaking about, don't speak.

    My DS's unit has 7 MECEPs and 2 STA-21s in the unit. I know what I'm talking about. You're latter points about the competition are, I'm sure, correct... which is why I suggested it be further down the list for someone looking for ways to fund their college education and become an officer. Most of the MECEPs, if not all, in his unit are Sergeants... but the eligibility requirements, which I'm sure the OP would fully research, say at least a corporal.

    Edit: BTW, I'm not lobbying for MECEPs here. Just pointing out it's existence if other plans fall through.
     
  6. lukepeoples

    lukepeoples Member

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    I feel silly now Kinnem! MECP (on the Navy side) stands for Medical Enlisted Comissioning Program. We pronounce it MECEP and I was totally mistaken! And I must politely tell you that STA-21 is actually as competitive as I say, but my statistics may be for the medical side of everything (as most of my data is coming from Navy Medicine.)

    That doesn't discount from the fact that enlisting in the Armed Services does not provide a service for the personnel. There are many great perks for us (including ones for schooling) but to expect to finish another Academy package for the class of 2018 and finish his MOS schools at the same time is unrealistic. It took me two years to even be able to think about an officer package. For some the pipelines are shorter, but enlisting to get into an SA exclusively is wrong.

    I'm not providing hearsay that I heard from my DS or DD or anything like that, I am not providing information from the point of a student, I am voicing a very stern opinion from the fleet. While I was putting in my package I was still operational and had a mission to complete. Some commands (not many, but a lot of training commands) will not provide the "Commanding Officer's Recommendation" (which stands in for the BGO interview and accounts for a large portion of the file, including being the prerequisite for SECNAV Nomination) until they get to a Permanent Duty Station. The only place that I have seen (based on statistics that I have read) largely give a number of candidates is Rated Nukes with an NEC in Power School. Those who have already been in service for over a year and a half and are working towards a "C" School. I am not saying it isn't possible, because I know there are others out there, just unlikely.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2013
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Ahhh... honest mistake then, Understood.
    I don't disagree with anything else you have said, nevertheless it IS out there and some people do make it work. It definitely would not be my preferred route and if one were looking for funding you could perhaps do better (or perhaps easier) with the GI Bill.
     
  8. lukepeoples

    lukepeoples Member

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    I just get a little miffed when I see people that present the idea that they can't fail and don't recognize the fact that in the event that things don't go according to plan, they are bound to a contract that could put their life in danger.

    This is the military. People die every day protecting this country with the uniform on their back. If a commission is for you, it will sooner or later happen. But who knows, I could be wrong.
     
  9. profsparrow

    profsparrow Member

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    Just something else to consider

    I was in the USAF. I imagine that USN is similar... Assuming that is true...you will spend a couple months in basic training, then you will go to training for your particular specialty, requiring various lengths of time depending upon the complexity of your specialty. Then you'll get a permanent duty assignment.

    Depending, again, upon what your specialty is, and the size of your particular unit, your commander may not even get to know how good you are, or recognize your name among 100s or 1000s of other Marines, for a couple of years. He (or she) needs to know you well enough, and think highly enough of you, to get behind you and assist you in your journey to USNA.

    IMHO, your time is better spent participating in an ROTC program while making outstanding grades in college. I believe that would be the faster track. As another poster had said, don't enlist unless you really want to be enlisted. You'll have a terribly important job to do, and that job will be where your focus will be.
     
  10. pilot2b

    pilot2b Candidate Appointee

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    What he said. Nearly all priors at NAPS spent at least 2 years enlisted and some upwards of 3, just barely making the cutoff age. It takes time and it is difficult to transition. If your ultimate goal is USNA, go to community college or a 4-year college. If your goal is to enlist, then enlist. It is possible to get to USNA from the enlisted side, but not the statistically best route available.
     
  11. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    As an example of what you can run into applying to the Academy from the fleet, this is what happened to me as a jr. officer aboard a destroyer. A new young ET (Electronics Technician), whom we had been waiting for for months as we were undermanned, presented himself to me on his second day and expressed his desire to go to USNA and since I was an Academy grad he thought it would be an administrative breeze. My first internal reaction was "we have been waiting for you for months, we are short handed, we have a major inspection coming up, and you want to LEAVE?" First off, I would never recommend anybody for an officer program without the full approval of my senior enlisted people and they want to see a young man in action for at least a grading cycle or 6 months. My department head wanted to see that, the XO wanted to see that, and the Captain (also an Academy grad) wanted to see that.

    Guess what? The sailor missed the current application cycle over that 6 months. He had missed two previously as he went through boot camp and A School. Then when it came time to review his request, the majority of the senior enlisted types approved except for one whom this young sailor had managed to piss off mightily and it stopped things in its tracks as I held my own private little investigation over the heartburn. After a lot of time spent and reflection it became apparent it was a real personality clash and the group tendency was to support the senior enlisted over the sailor for obvious reasons. As it turned out, he did get his recommendation but it was certainly not as glowing as it could have been. It was a very near thing and he just as easily could have been turned down. I never found out if he got an appointment as I left the ship soon thereafter. I would recommend the enlisted route only as a LAST resort of a young man who had absolutely no money and no way to pay for a civilian college. It is just too fraught with landmines and eats up valuable time.
     
  12. mulan50

    mulan50 Member

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    ChrisWilder07 - my son is in same situation. He is a USMC reservist going to college full time. Reserve duty is a lot different now since Iraqui Freedom as more and more Reservists see some kind of active duty. My older son was Reserve, had to delay his senior year in college because his unit was deployed to Anbar right before the surge. Anyway this one got his CO recommendation and SECNAV last year but technically had not reported to his duty station as he was still in MOS school. He has applied again, got SECNAV and Congressional nomination just waiting. From enlisted side, you cannot get SECNAV without CO recommedation plus 2 other senior officers. He is also applying for PLC program which is USMC. Outcome with MECEP, PLC & OCS is same, completion of graduation, 2nd LT., just not prestige of Annapolis graduate. If you do go Reserve, you can still go to college full time and receive SS Montgomery GI Bill for Reservists.

    Lukes Peoples - not sure what you mean that being enlisted is not a path for SA since enlisted you may be called to put your life on the line. If you are in any of the academies you sure as hell better know that sooner or later you will be called to do the same thing, it is not a free ride. You are obligated after receiving that education to 'pay' back with service time.
     
  13. lukepeoples

    lukepeoples Member

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    I just mean that I see a lot of people throw around enlisting, especially into the Marine corps, and don't seem to realise the huge sacrifices that are made when you go down that path.
     
  14. mulan50

    mulan50 Member

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    Luke, all are called to make sacrifices whether now in enlisted state or 4 years later after a SA graduation. All of you kids on here are amazing. You are going through the process, some reapplying after rejection because you want to be in the best school there is USNA. But the thing is if it doesn't work out, you are not really rejected, you just have to find another means of achieving your dreams and goals. Will share a story. My cousin went to college via NROTC, no scholarship, just in program. She was 1st female law advisor assigned to a ship. She is now a Commander, Sr. Naval Judge Advocate presently in Ca. Her husband went to college midwest. On graduating taught high school chemistry and coached. Decided after a few years of teaching to apply OCS and Nuclear Prpellant school. He is a Captain and most recently was assigned as Commanding Officer of a ship which has just come back to Ca. a few months ago after deployment. Neither one had the benefit of a SA. They just persevered and followed their dreams with what avenues were afforded to them. You and all the others if this is your dream to be commisioned will find a way. May not be easy but if it is truly what you want, you will not be deterred.
     
  15. ChrisWilder07

    ChrisWilder07 Member

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    I apologize for just now responding, but this thread rang a bell in my head a few days ago, and I figured I should respond to give an update on my situation and to close this open door.

    First and foremost, I ended up deciding to stop the enlistment process and chose to attend Texas A&M University and be a member of the Corps of Cadets this fall.

    Second, when I was considering enlisting, I was fully aware of the commitment and that I would most likely serve overseas and possibly die for my country, as I am also aware that this outcome is a possibility after I'm commissioned after college.

    Third, I was not meaning to use the enlistment process as a vehicle to get myself into the Naval Academy and by no means would it have been an easy way. I want to serve my country and I was willing to enlist right out of high school because I simply wanted to serve my country as a Marine. If I took that route, I would eventually want to try to earn an appointment to the Naval Academy and be commissioned as a Marine Corps officer because that has been and still is my goal. However, after I received my TWE from USNA, I was faced with the decision. Through much debate and discussion, I decided to attend Texas A&M this fall. I am, however, reapplying to the Naval Academy for the Class of 2018.

    In no way was I meaning to disrespect the enlistment process by using it as a "ticket to a service academy" and I apologize if it came across that way. I have the utmost respect for any and all who serve, no matter the route.

    All I want to do is serve my country, one way or the other, and I'm aware of the commitment and of the danger. I'm willing to lay down my life for my country, and I have been aware of this fact ever since I first became interested in the Marine Corps.

    I appreciate your advice and your counsel, as is evident by the fact that I chose to attend a university and join the NROTC program. Thank you for your service to this country, and I thank you for your guidance and direction.
     
  16. bob80q

    bob80q bob80q Banned

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    just curious, how is plan c disrespectful and a bad idea? Perhaps you need to engage your brain before your fingers go in gear.
     

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