Even with a freshman year like this, could I still get an ROTC scholarship?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by rubio1996, Jul 24, 2011.

  1. rubio1996

    rubio1996 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    C in Honors Chemistry (usually taken by strong students in their Junior Year)
    C- in Honors Geometry (usually taken by strong students in their Freshman or Sophomore Year)
    A- in World History (my school does not have any Honors or AP History courses for freshmen)
    B- in English I (my school does not have any Honors or AP English courses for freshmen)
    B- in Spanish I
    A- in Multimedia Design
    A+ in Concert Band (only counts as half a course)
    50+ Hours of Community Service (earning me Honors Community Service)

    I didn't play any sports this year, but I performed in the Spring Drama Production and wrote a play and acted in another play in the school drama festival (which had to be written, practiced, and performed within 24 hours). I was a regular volunteer at the children's section of my local library. Other events I volunteered for were two local folk festivals, the state Special Olympics, and a school information session. I had two unsuccessful campaigns for student government, one being the Ninth Grade Vice President and the other being the School Treasurer. However, I was elected the Ninth Grade Alternate Class Representative. I was also a member of my church's youth group, and will continue to be for the rest of my time in high school.

    This summer, I am going to volunteer at the hospital where my mom works, volunteer at the local library's children's section, be involved in the school summer play-readings, get Algebra II tutoring before I take the course, and I'm still in the process of convincing my parents to let me start taking glider plane lessons and get a student glider pilot's certificate (if I get my student glider pilot's certificate this summer, I would attempt to get certified as a private glider pilot next summer when I turn 16)!

    Even with a freshman year like this, could I still get an ROTC scholarship to a top university?

    My classes for next year are Algebra II, Honors or Regular Biology (depending on the decision of the department head), AP World History, English II (my school does not have any Honors or AP English courses for sophomores), Honors or Regular Spanish II (depending on the decision of the department head), Introduction to Computer Science, and Concert Band.

    Next year, I plan on getting Honors Community service by volunteering in many of the events I participated in this year, being a member of my church's youth group, joining Model UN, joining Model Congress, joining the Euro Challenge team, joining some clubs that are of interest to me (and hopefully attaining a leadership position), possibly co-found an aviation club (If I get my student glider pilot's certification this summer, I would possibly co-found the club with a high school senior who is a certified pilot. He would be the President for his last year, while I serve as Vice President, and in the following years, I will become President for the club for the remainder of my time in high school), running for student government, running for the school Cross Country team, wrestling for the school Wrestling team, working in the technical crew for the fall play, perform in the spring play, and write and [act or stage manage] for the school drama festival. For the fall or winter, I'm looking into applying for an internship for my congressman. Also, I plan on going on a Mission of Hope trip to Nicaragua next summer. I may possibly join the Naval Sea Cadet Corps out of interest in the U.S. Navy and/or the Civil Air Patrol out of interest in aviation.

    Thank you.
     
  2. SCcandidate2015

    SCcandidate2015 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    0
    You sure can. I had a D my freshman year of high school, mind you my only one ever, and I got a 4-year Army to The Citadel (not exactly a "Top School" to most people, but to some, like South Carolina residents, this is a high aspiration and is about as good as it gets). I did pick my grades up my sophomore year and significantly in my junior and senior years, and I finished top six percent, but I wasn't the best. I think what did it for me was I had great leadership stuff, and my interviewing officer was just about the most down-to-earth, teenager-understanding guy I've ever met.
    If I can give you one piece of advice that you are in full control of, however, it would be to play a sport. Very important.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    I am not sure you are being honest with yourself regarding everything you are putting on your plate and getting your grades up. Yes, you need to be well rounded, and yes, you need sports, but you also need the grades. Honestly, if you are pulling Cs without sports, and extra clubs, I can't see pulling up your grades, joining more clubs and sports happening.

    I can tell you that any sport during the season will require at least 15 hours a week for about 5 months, or a semester. You are talking about that + an internship, + glider lessons + CAP + two plays + volunteering. There are only X amount of hours in a day and days in a week.

    You have yet to say which branch or what major. Nobody can give you a 100% for sure, except 100% for sure you will not get if you don't apply. For AROTC the majors aren't an issue. For AF/NROTC it does matter. For A/NROTC the colleges are a part of the process, for AF it is not. If you are going to try for all 3, than you need to work your goals to be competitive for all 3.

    OBTW if you want AF or Navy, you need to pull those math and science grades up. C's won't cut it. For AFROTC the avg stats for a Type 7 (lowest scholarship, most common), gpa was 3.77 and SAT was 1260. 85% of all of AF/NROTC scholarships are awarded to tech majors.
     
  4. Packer

    Packer Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2011
    Messages:
    1,877
    Likes Received:
    5
    The EC activities are important and you need to do them, especially sports. However, you seem to be going overboard on your ECs to the detriment of your grades. If your freshman year grades continue the next two years I would give you a low chance. If you get your grades up, sure you have a decent chance. C's and C- are not going to cut it though, no more of those.
     
  5. gojack

    gojack ....

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    791
    Likes Received:
    2
    ^^^
    Agreed, get your GPA up (3.75+) and keep it there.
     
  6. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,273
    Likes Received:
    312
    Even With...

    Since you mentioned the goal of getting into a top school, keep in mind that the school's admission criteria may not entirely coincide with ROTC scholarship qualifications.

    I've heard a number of admissions officers at competitive schools say they were looking for candidates who, aside from (or, rather, in addition to) good grades and test scores had exhibited a passion for their endeavors, be it a sport, an EC, or a hobby. They indicated that this was more important to them than someone's having spread themselves across a broad range of activities without an indentifiable commitment.

    I'm not suggesting it's wrong to have a lot of interests. This is a great time of life to explore new areas. So be open, but also be honest with yourself. You seem to be involved in a lot of activities. You may want to consider whether which ones light you up.

    Also, thinking ahead, don't take the standardized tests (SATs, ACTs) lightly.
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    ED is absolutely correct about colleges. They want that well rounded student because most studies have shown that kids who are 'book smart only' have an issue when it comes to success at college. The main reason why is that they have never had to deal with time management regarding school. The kid with EC's had a life outside of hitting the books and have illustrated their ability to juggle both aspects of life.

    Obviously you have EC's, but academically you are having issues juggling them. I don't know what "top universities" you are talking about, but as others have stated you need to get those grades up and keep them there. For example, UVA IS students have above the avg gpa for ROTC. Notre Dame is above the gpa. These are not Ivies, but what I would consider top notch.

    In no means is it too late. You are only a rising sophomore, you have more than enough time, but you need to me honest with yourself. I don't have a clue why you took Honors Chemistry, let alone Chemistry at all as a freshman without taking Algebra II. You need to accept and understand that your math is lagging behind your science, and your sciences will require the corresponding math. I hope that your GC is not allowing you to take Physics this yr., because your corresponding math should be trig/pre-calc not ALG II. If you are, you will probably repeat those grades again this yr. Physics takes a lot of Math, it requires that you have ALG II under your belt. Slow down you are only a rising sophomore, at your rate you will be out of sciences prior to graduation. Colleges and ROTC would rather see A's and B's ending with Physics (Honors/AP) over C's and filling the square early.

    For the record make sure you take the PSAT this fall. One thing those "top universities" look at is the National Merit Semi-Finalists/Finalists. They love to put in those glossy brochures the % of them attending their university. It is typically given soph. yr in Oct. Top 5 NSMF, and above compete from there. It also opens you up for merit money.

    For ROTC sports are important for various reasons. Obviously because it shows you are physically fit is one reason. The others illustrate team work, commitment and leadership. All four aspects are vital to be successful in the military.

    They also don't want to see 20 ECs over 4 or 5. What they are looking for is commitment and growth in the ones you selected, not flittering from here to there to somewhere else in the belief that by doing 20 it shows you are well rounded.

    Finally, I don't know the school you attend, but unless it is very affluent I can't see a flying club taking off. It appears you haven't started on your gliding, but our DS has a PPL, and just to get enough hours for him to student solo, cost us about 3K (flt hours in NC was 175). Not many kids have parents in these financial times that can afford to lay out that amount of money. Additionally, what would be the motivation for kids to join even if they were all able to get a license? Their instructors are instructors, you are all students, you actually would harm each other if you gave advice. Their flight school will do their flight plans. Even if you pass that level, the school may KABOSH it just from the perspective that, at least our school, every club must have a teacher to be there for insurance purposes. You would need to find a teacher who would want to stay after school (unpaid) for your club. Most teachers are required to stay 45 minutes after the bell, typically that is the time they work with students, lesson plan, input grades, or grade papers (I was a teacher). They rarely want to be in charge of a club unless it is something they love. Not every JROTC instructor, even AF ever flew....at our hs, the AFJROTC instructors flew desks, the ones that flew in the AF continued on that path after retirement.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011

Share This Page