Ezema/Atopic dermatitis

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by JordanS338, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. JordanS338

    JordanS338 Jordan

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    Can any one tell me why Ezema (A skin condition) Would be a disqualifing medical condition? And can it be waivered?
     
  2. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    It is something that can't be treated while on deployments in the field. It is considered a recurring condition.

    Waivers for very difficult to get.

    Search this thread, there is a lot of information on the subject.
     
  3. SeaMars

    SeaMars Member

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    ..but don't give up hope.

    True eczema is an autoimmune disease; a flareup in the field can lead to infection difficult to treat, and I am told that waivers are granted less often than not. But "eczema" seems to be a label that includes several less serious ailments, for which waivers have been granted in the past.
     
  4. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Thank you, I should have added that in my post.
     
  5. Packer

    Packer Member

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    Eczema often shows up in infants and toddlers. (it likely isn't actually eczema). My son had it when he was 3 or 4. This triggered a DoDMerb remedial request for all related medical records. Records were provided showing it was not a continueing problem and he was fully qualified about 2 weeks later.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Our DD who is 20 has eczema, and has had it since she was about 3-4 yos. I could easily understand why it would be a DQ.

    For our DD it flares up whenever it flares up, there are no signs prior to flaring up. However, when it occurs, it is horrible due to the incessant amount of scratching associated with it. Now, place yourself in the field, that scratching can lead to infections as others have stated. Afghanistan is a dusty place, and that can lead to infections, along with sweat too.

    The meds required to treat eczema are not over the counter, in other words Gold Bond is not a solution. They are prescription, only something a doc can order.
     
  7. Sketch22

    Sketch22 New Member

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    Greetings, I am currently an AFROTC cadet going through the DODMERB process. I was diagnosed with Serboheric Dermatitis (which is a sub-condition for eczema) when I was younger and it still continues to come up every so often. I have used prescription medications in the past, however, recently I started using an over-the-counter medication and by using it 2-3 times a week it has virtually vanished.

    I understand that this will be an automatic DQ. How difficult will it be for me to get a waiver?
     
  8. Proud mom 2016

    Proud mom 2016 Member

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    I believe it also is an issue with the smallpox vaccine which they give for deployments. My dd had excema as a child and dh had to wait until he got to theater to get vaccine so as not to affect her. Interestingly, he has had excema type issues since his last deployment although he had no prior history.
     
  9. Sketch22

    Sketch22 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. To my knowledge I have never had a reaction to any kind of injection including vaccines. I also do not have any allergies that I am aware of. While my condition is genetic and therefore permanent, I can control it with over the counter meds and it rarely flares up anyway.
     

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