FAFSA and ROTC scholarship

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by NewKid, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. NewKid

    NewKid New Member

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    My parents and I have begun the long task of completing the FAFSA form. I have searched high and low to the answer to my question, but all I find is conflicting information.
    Does anyone know if you are to input a dollar value - based on your intended school's tuition - in the scholarships section of the FAFSA form, or is it left blank?
    Most I have read says NOT to input it, which actually helps with the EFC number, but I do not want to misrepresent myself.
    Anyone know for sure??
    Thanks -
     
  2. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    For incoming Freshman

    The FAFSA looks backward at 2010 so if you are a high school senior the answer is DO NOT include. If you are presently in school probably the same answer but you will need to look at the 1098-T issued by the school to be certain.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    That is correct as a n incoming Freshman FAFSA is based on the previous yr and since you are not contracted with the military even if you are awarded the scholarship it has no impact.

    You can't contract until you are there and pass their PFT. You have a scholarship, but it still has contingencies.
     
  4. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    I think what OP is referring to the concept of whether an Armed Forces tuition reimbursement is to be considered Scholarship money. I read on College Confidential a thread indicating that ROTC scholarships are not to be considered college scholarships, but rather fit in another category.

    Sorry I cannot immediately recall what it said, but the poster was going to do more research on that topic.

    It's obviously not particularly relevant to 4 yr. scholarship winners, but siblings attending college at the same time will get a completely different EFA depending on whether the ROTC tuition payment is considered a scholarship.
     
  5. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    ROTC scholarships are no longer considered FA, but a military benefit. You will not need to mention it as FA this year for your freshman FAFSA reporting. It and the stipend however may be considered non-taxable income in future years' filings.

    See the link in this post

    http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/showpost.php?p=111869&postcount=12

    and the surrounding discussion for details.

    Congratulations.
     
  6. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    Couple of ideas

    First, if the ROTC scholarship covers tuition it's not going into the FAFSA equation as aid that "counts" is money that exceeds the cost of tuition. What possibly may count are monies that pay room and board. This is why once enrolled and filing subsequent FAFSA's you must look at the 1098-T issued by the university to see what may need to count.

    Second, there are recent changes (2009) as to how ROTC monies can be combined with other funds when the university awards the financial aid package. Generally there is now more ability for other federal monies to be included in the package with the ROTC funds as there have been recent changes that allow for ROTC funds to become "invisible" when totaling the amount of aid. You really need to check with the financial aid office to see if they have reviewed the recent changes in regulations.

    As has been mentioned in recent postings, even if you do have to include some of your awards on your FAFSA (and as you file taxes) there is often no "penalty" to the student because they have very little other income.
     
  7. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    Great Reference

    Great reference, Goaliedad. Any student when receiving their financial aid award letter should take the budget (COA) subtract the aid awarded and make sure the difference does not include the ROTC scholarship. If the ROTC scholarship is included your DOE letter should be furnished to the school for review.
     
  8. NewKid

    NewKid New Member

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    Thanks to everyone for responding.
    As I will be a freshman next year, I understand it will not be necessary to supply FAFSA with the tuition dollar value in the scholarship section.
    Will this be the same for subsequent years?
    Just trying to bridge the gap between ROTC tuition coverage and the remaining room/board/etc expenses. Also, it is required by my school that ALL students complete both a FAFSA and a CCI Profile.
     
  9. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    Folks need to remember that FAFSA ONLY determines your eligibility for FEDERAL financial aid. Federal Financial Aid includes Pell Grants and Stafford Loans; which are entitlements along with a few other grants and loans (SEOG, Perkins) which will vary from school to school.
    Entitlement means if you qualify (by virture of your FAFSA calculated EFC) you will be eligible and receive the aid.
    The cut off for a Pell Grant is an Expected Family Contribution of $5273 for 2010-11. If your EFC is higher than $5273 per year you do not qualify.
    If your EFC shows "need" then you will qualify for a Subsidized Stafford Loan (the gov't pays the interest while you are in school). EVERYONE qualifies for an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan.

    Stafford Loan amounts are dictated by your year in school. Freshmen are allowed to borrow $3500/YEAR, Sophomores, $4500/yr, Juniors and Seniors $5500/year. Additionally every student is also allowed an additional $2000/year - Unsubsidized.

    All other Federal programs are case by case and by school. Some schools will offer the SEOG and others will not.

    Institutional Aid - this is aid offered by the college. They make the decision based on information received from you and none of it is entitlement and all is subjective.

    ROTC scholarships do not affect the Federal EFC. IN other words, if you qualified for a Pell grant prior to the scholarship you will still qualify.
    Your ROTC scholarship can and will affect your Institutional Aid and possible other federal aid such as SEOG grant, Perkins loans and some state aid.

    For incoming freshmen - do NOT include any scholarships you have been awarded but not actually received. If you do NOT have the money - do not count it.

    You don't actually have the ROTC scholarship until it has been paid and you have contracted. At that time, expect the Financial Aid office to revise your financial aid award. They can and they will.
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    FAFSA also has more to do with the amount your folks make since even in college you will be their dependent.

    Additionally, the numbers have changed for FAFSA for a freshman it is 5500, soph, 6500 and jr/sr 7500.
     
  11. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    Total Loan Limits


    Those are the total limits but Just_a_mom was showing the maximum amount totals broken out between subsidized and unsubsidized and her amounts are correct.
     
  12. philmont

    philmont Member

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    Is it REQUIRED to fill out the FAFSA? My DS was offered 4 year AROTC scholarship from Oct board for this fall. Do we have to fill out a FAFSA? Because even without the scholarship we have saved a good amount of money for his college (529 plan) and I am sure we won't qualify for aid anyway. :confused:
     
  13. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    You should not be required to file the FAFSA. Having said that, you should know that even if you have saved/earn 6 million dollars you would qualify for $5500 in loan as a freshman.
     
  14. philmont

    philmont Member

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    ok, thanks. I think I am beginning to understand, maybe :confused:
     
  15. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    What I mean is if you file the FAFSA you would have loan eligibility of $5500 no matter what you earn or have saved.
     
  16. philmont

    philmont Member

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    I see. I just wonder if it is worth filing if we wouldn't need the loan this year. The money in the 529 has to be used for education purposes, so need to spend it...does that make sense?
    Thanks, this is all new to me!
     
  17. philmont

    philmont Member

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    Looks like I might not have a choice with filling out the FAFSA. I will check with Norwich University. I am really just trying to put off doing my taxes by getting out of the FAFSA! :wink:
     
  18. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    Now Timeliness is next to Godliness

    Well you could always file the FAFSA with estimated numbers, that's an option. Then you could go back and update the information once you have "real" numbers. However, one of the things you learn when you have kids in college is the importance of filing your taxes timely.
     
  19. Ohio2015Parent

    Ohio2015Parent Member

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    I couldn't agree more!! Our oldest DD (now college sophomore) was my first stab at FAFSA...I actually was online midnight New Years Eve filing with estimated numbers, Financial Aid told me it was like taking a number at the deli counter - first filed, first served....I didn't file at midnight last year, but by the 15Jan it was in (estimated). This year I'll file 1Feb-2Feb, its just easier to do it with the real numbers than to have to update..... but honestly, first filed/first served sounds pretty much across the financial aid office policies. This doesn't mean you have to file the taxes (especially if you owe) before the tax deadline. Our family counts on some government loan programs (Stafford, TEACH GRANT,and Federal Work Study) to supplement DD's merit scholarship since she went OS. She'll have about 20K in loans for the 4 years, not great, but not crippling to her future (just hope they still need chemistry and physics teachers in 3 years....)

    Thanks to all of you for posting the information about ROTC, stipend etc...how to account for all of these numbers is a chore, but I hope DS and I get the honor of filing his taxes next year for that scholarship & stipend amount:wink:
     
  20. allthenamesweretaken

    allthenamesweretaken New Member

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    other scholarship benefits?

    So my new question would be that because VA benefits (including ROTC benefits) do not effect the EFC calculation. Would we be eligible for other scholarships? For example the school that I am applying to has a scholarship just for maintaining a 3.0, 3.5 etc. Would my VA benefits exclude me from receiving that scholarship? Does it depend on the specific scholarship?

    Thanks
    Ben
     

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