Fitness for I-Day!?!?

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by Evader 53, May 7, 2009.

  1. Evader 53

    Evader 53 Member

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    Alright. As most appointees I'm sure, I'm beginning to worry that I'm not in good enough shape for BCT. I freaking strained my hip flexor and am still waiting for the thing to heal before I can start running again, and its making me really really nervous.

    So, my question is; what type of stuff should we be able to do before we arrive on I-day? Current cadets please help!

    I mean information like, be able to run 5 miles in 40 minutes, be able to do 100 continuous pushups, etc...

    P.S. Where I live is at sea-level....
     
  2. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Well, you did the CFA, correct? Be able to do all the things in the CFA WITHOUT too much effort. If you can do that, without a lot of effort, then you will be fine. Yes, the air up here is a total BIOTCH. We don't have a lot of oxygen. And what we have, is rationed. So, either do a lot of running or a lot of swimming; or both. That is the best advice I can give. And like I said, if you can do everything on the CFA again TODAY, meaning pushups, situps, pullups, etc... then you'll be fine. later.... mike.....
     
  3. HNeedle

    HNeedle Member

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    although i'm not a swimmer, swimming gives you an all around workout. legs, arms, upper body, and it's aerobic. if you can swim often, do it. if not, then work on everything: running, pushups, PULLUPS, etc. there arent any set numbers, just be able to do a whole lot of everything. :)
     
  4. Bombtrack

    Bombtrack Member

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    question, hornet or hneedle- the PFA at the academy...Is it 600m or 600yrd? I think I've seen them write both, but there's a difference.
     
  5. Downfall75

    Downfall75 USAFA Cadet

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    i think it's 600 yds.
     
  6. HNeedle

    HNeedle Member

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    eh, our indoor track is weird. i dont like it; the field house has no humidity whatsoever. if you're in there for .12 minutes, you get cotton mouth, which makes the PFT suck even worse... at least for me
     
  7. CadCandMateus

    CadCandMateus Recent Grad

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    ya same here, the AFT in there is even worse!
     
  8. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    :yllol:
    Ahh...where is Fred Tichanuk when I need a good bracing? :biggrin:

    As I said once, quite smartly in BCT: "Sir...the reason everyone is breathing hard is because at 7,000 feet of elevation, there is less oxygen!"

    :hammer:

    Turned out he was either a physics type or physiology type or just knew...

    "MISTER WOOD...the reason you can't breath, aside from being woefully out of physical condition (remember, I lived at USAFA 5 years PRIOR to BCT...I was fine) is that the partial pressure of the air at elevation is not high enough to allow enough oxygen to pass across the semipermeable membrane of the lungs! We have the same oxygen here as at sea level...it's the PRESSURE that's different...and I will endeavor to help you with that by ADDING pressure!!!"

    So for some reason I've remembered that, or at least pretty close...and will NEVER forget Fred Tichanuk, Class of 1981. He actually was a great guy!!

    So beware those of you about to head to BCT...words can burn you!
     
  9. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    You are most definitely correct. It isn't actually the amount of available oxygen. But rather the amount of oxygen getting to the brain through the lungs. But either way you look at it, if you aren't use to it, it can definitely make breathing a bit difficult. How your body adapts in beyond my medical degree. (My medical degree consists of "Playing Doctor". LOL!!) mike....
     
  10. CadCandMateus

    CadCandMateus Recent Grad

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    Don't freak out, they will put you in the shape they want you in :)
     
  11. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    rectangle, square, octagon, all SORTS of SHAPES.
     
  12. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    Yep...

    And besides, it'll only take your body something like 23 days to produce the "extra" red blood cells to compensate.

    Until then...as CC said: "RUN, RUN, do pushups/pullups/situps...then RUN some more!!!''
     
  13. Bombtrack

    Bombtrack Member

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    I heard it has to do something with the amount of hemoglobin cells. People at sea level have fewer of them so the body has to work extra hard to get those to work? Also, swimming, apparently helps increase the amount of hemoglobin. which is why a lot of swimmers, even from sea level, aren't hit so hard with the altitude...
     
  14. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    No such thing as "hemoglobin cells." You are referring to what flieger just mentioned. The body (for the average male) will usually produce an additional unit (pint) of blood at altitude to compenstate for the lower partial pressure of oxygen. So you have 7 instead of 6 pints in your body. Red blood cells (erythrocytes) carry oxygen due to the hemoglobin they contain.
     
  15. Bombtrack

    Bombtrack Member

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    ahhh yeah that's it.
     
  16. l Taz l

    l Taz l Member

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    thats why he is going to be a doc........
     
  17. DMAC09

    DMAC09 Member

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    ...and that's why I'm not...
     
  18. kt.gipson@gmail.com

    kt.gipson@gmail.com Member

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    I'm just curious, when you go back to sea level does that pint go away or is it permanent?
     
  19. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    It will eventually go away. Remember, your cells are always cycling which is an advantage because you can adapt to new climates that way. When you return to sea level, your bone marrow will down regulate production until you reach the normal again as the old cells die.
     
  20. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    A lot of athletes would do blood doping to increase RBC and enhance their performance. I remember when I left the Rocky Mountains and got assigned to Soesterberg Air Base, Netherlands. I went from 6500 ft to NEGATIVE -45 feet below see level. For about 6 months I could probably out run just about everyone on the base.
     

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