Fulfill Your Destiny videos

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Memphis9489, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    If you have never seen these "Fulfill Your Destiny" promotionals by the Naval Academy? You should watch them:

    http://www.usna.edu/fyd/index.php

    The second one from the bottom is the one that really gets me; the one with Midshipman Nanda Ramchandar. He is going into the Medical Corps to become a doctor. A naive candidate may watch that video and think that the Naval Academy encourages its graduates to become doctors.

    Well ... uh ... no ... not exactly. The recent graduating Class of 2010 had a grand total of ten go into the Medical Corps. That represents less than 1% of the class.

    What they don't tell you is this: Going into the Medical Corps is not much encouraged as a service selection. You have to get permission from the Naval Academy to even pursue that service selection. And you're on your own getting accepted into a medical school.

    But, after watching this video, you'd think that, "Hey! What a great idea! I could go to the Naval Academy and become a doctor!"

    Yeah, well don't tell that to your Blue & Gold Officer at your interview.

    It's hard to imagine that they dedicated an entire video promotional on a service selection that represents less than 1% of the class. To me, it comes very close to deceptive advertising.

    If you want to be a military doctor - go to West Point - not Annapolis. Better yet, get an ROTC scholarship and apply to the Medical Corps from there.

    The Naval Academy seems to change their policy on the Medical Corps every year. At one point, they said they were going to expand the quota to 25. Now they seem to be limiting it to 10. That's a pretty big difference.

    It carries a hefty extended service obligation, by the way. Basically, it's making the Navy a career the day you graduate; something else that isn't mentioned in the video.

    I'm wondering if these were the recruiting videos that got Superintendent Fowler into so much hot water.
     
  2. goldfarb1

    goldfarb1 Candidate

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    I'm taking a guess here that these were the videos that administration spent something like 4 mil on? Could be wrong though.

    Not to be a film critic, but to be honest they really aren't that motivating. Probably the least motivating of any "military commercial" I've ever seen. Pick any commericial you see on TV for Navy or USMC. I've never seen one that I've watched and said "wow, this was a terrible waist of tax dollars...who would possibly join after watching that."

    See for yourself:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwY67LYzH7Q
     
  3. USMMA2014mom

    USMMA2014mom Member

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    The Marine Corps has and always will do it right, that is why they are The Few and The Proud...if that commercial does not make someone choke up I don't know what would... In my opinion, the newest version of the Fulfill Your Destiny DVD's that were given to BGO's is so disappointing and I truly feel send the wrong message to those prospective candidates that are watching it...the older version is a much better choice to continue to show...
     
  4. DevilDog

    DevilDog Member

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    My son wants to be a doctor, he was accepted to USNA and USAFA with this class (2014). I called the Naval Academy to ask if that was the wrong place for him if he wants a medical career. I had heard the same things from many people, and from reading this board and CC. ROTC would be the better way, go to a civilian school, etc. I was told they were going to make it smoother for the midshipmen that had med school in their sites, starting with this incoming class. They were going to encourage the midshipmen to apply to med school and if they were accepted, they were almost a lock to go. This was from his admissions counselors mouth. The thing I could never get a good handle on was the committment part. I have heard anywhere from the original 5 year committment to a lot more. Does anyone know what it really is?
    My son chose AF for a variety of reasons. He said to me one day, that if he can't be a doctor, being a pilot would not be such a bad 2nd choice.
     
  5. DevilDog

    DevilDog Member

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    They don't all fly drones. They choose to fly drones. I think he liked the idea of not being at sea for lengthy periods. More than half the graduating class at AF gets UPT. He loved the USNA, but the opportunities at AF were more suited for his career aspirations. He wants to be a doctor or pilot and he wants to have a family. I think the idea of land based assignments were more appealing to him. Although knowing my son, I would not be surprised if he gets into pararescue.
     
  6. SteveHolt243

    SteveHolt243 Member

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  7. falconchic88

    falconchic88 Member

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    Devil Dog, when I went thru USAFA, there weren't many that went into medical school, but it was because not many tried, the slots and opportunities were there. I was a Biology major, and I saw several of my friends go on to med school. I wish I could tell you the commitment. They had the initial five years, and then an additional commitment for Med school, that started after they finished med school, but they were served concurrently, meaning the med school commitment wasn't tacked onto the end of the service academy commitment. Let me do some digging and see if I can find out what the service commitment is these days.
     
  8. falconchic88

    falconchic88 Member

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    Found this info on Wiki, so no telling the accuracy, but it sounds right:
    "Physicians can enter service into the Air Force through several different paths. Cadets at the US Air Force Academy can compete for selection to medical school at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS). An academy graduate who attends USUHS will incur a ten year service commitment. Civilian undergraduates can also apply to USUHS, they incur a seven year service commitment. USUHS student are commissioned officers at the rank of Second Lieutenant (O-1) and are paid as full time active duty members. All of their school and expenses are paid by the US Air Force. USUHS graduates must complete residency training in a military residency program. Civilian medical school students can apply for the Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP). HPSP medical students have their medical school tuition paid by the US Air Force and receive a monthly stipend for living expenses, but they are not on active duty. These graduates can usually attend a civilian or military residency training program and incur a three or four year service commitment (one year commitment per year of scholarship assistance). "
     
  9. DevilDog

    DevilDog Member

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    Thanks Falconchic88. He has plenty of time to do the research and make decisions. All these kids have great opportunities ahead of them.
     
  10. AcademyFriend1

    AcademyFriend1 Member

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    My godson was one of only 15 allowed to service select for medical in 2008. They found out so late that it put them behind civilian peers in the med school app process. He was ready to make another choice--understood that the needs of the Navy come first--but it does seem that if they will allow mids to go to med school they should work out the process so they aren't hurt in application chances. As I understand it, a mid owes 9 years total if the Navy pays for med school but only 5 years if he pays for it himself (or herself).
     
  11. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    One point . . . USNA has changed their approach to candidates who want to be MDs. In the past, that was the death knell of an application. BGOs were told last year that this is no longer the case -- and the number of mids who are permitted to go Medical Corps has actually increased. I would add that by "the number who are permitted," I mean available slots. For various reasons, not all of those slots are often filled.

    The above said, if your #1 goal is to be a doctor, you're probably better off going elsewhere b/c the path through USNA is, as noted above, difficult and your dream may not be realized. However, saying you want to do it won't be viewed negatively as it was in the past.
     
  12. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Thanks for the info. That's good to know.

    I would think that the EXTRA commitment of a USNA grad who goes to medical school would have some value to the Navy. As I've said before, going Medical Corps out of the Naval Academy is, essentially, a career decision. A career in the Navy, that is.

    It's the anti-"Five and Dive" :smile:
     
  13. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    The way they explained it is that it helps to have MDs who have more than a passing acquaintance with the military. Ironically, this same point was made in a book written by a Navy MD who served with the USMC in Afghanistan. Not that he felt MDs should attend SAs; rather, that having been in the military before becoming an MD (he was prior USMC enlisted) is a benefit for a number of reasons (articulated in his book).
     

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