GERD

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Biggins, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. Biggins

    Biggins New Member

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    Hi. I have GERD which causes me to throw up more often than a normal person. It also gives me acid reflux when I eat certain foods. I can control most of the symptoms using OTC medication. I understand this is a disqualifying condition but I was wondering If I could get a waiver for it. I have been off all medication for this for 2 weeks with a few problems. I have a 4.0 GPA and got a 1810 on my SAT, would that help me get a waiver? Thank you for your time.
     
  2. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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  3. buff81

    buff81 Moderator

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    I have no idea about the process at the other Service Academies or at Cadet Command, but here is some insight to the waiver process at West Point.

    I'll expand on your question because grades/GPA alone do not represent how strong your file is.

    Does the strength of a candidate's file help in obtaining a medical waiver?
    On rare occasion - Maybe.

    If you receive a DQ from DoDMERB, this determination goes to your Regional Commander (RC) at West Point. According to our RC, he will determine whether you are competitive enough of a candidate to consider you for a waiver. He does not care in the least about what you were DQ'd for. He doesn't even look at why you were DQ'd. His concern is whether you are a competitive candidate. If he determines that you are a competitive candidate, then he will request a waiver.

    The waiver request then goes to the Docs at West Point. The Docs don't care in the least about your GPA/test scores. They are only concerned with your medical history and making a determination on whether to grant or deny the waiver request for you. If they recommend that the waiver be granted, then it goes before the Admissions Committee. If their recommendation is that the waiver be denied, then it will not go before the admissions committee UNLESS the RC intervenes and appeals the waiver. This is where the strength of your file comes into play. A RC has to really think that you are exceptional to appeal a denied medical waiver.

    An appeal is rare.
     
  4. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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    Buff81's reply is approximately 98% accurate. While I wouldn't have stated it that way, the concept is the same:thumb:
     
  5. eells12

    eells12 New Member

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    I have almost the same problem however, I had surgery in 2009 to correct the problem and have had no issues related with GERD since then. Will I be able to get a waiver?
     

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