Getting Back My Scholarship?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Stanford17, Apr 14, 2014.

  1. Stanford17

    Stanford17 New Member

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    Hello,

    (skip to last paragraph for shortened version)

    Having received a near perfect SAT and strait As in AP classes, I had always hoped of attending a top college. I realized that I needed a full scholarship to attend one of these, and I found the ROTC scholarship. I was never the athletic type, but I figured "what the hell" and sent off an application to ROTC. Turns out they liked me, since I was almost immediately given an ISR scholarship. And I got into Stanford!!

    Coming from Arizona, it was a bit of a culture shock to suddenly be up north, far from home, surrounded by genii, and being in a military bootcamp (I'm not the physical/athletic/aggressive type!). On the first day of orientation, after experiencing waking up at 4:30AM and working all through the day until 10PM, and getting yelled at constantly by drill sergeants, and being the smallest/slowest/weakest/worst midshipman in the unit, I decided that I didn't care about anything and just wanted to go home and attend a state school. Now upon reflecting on the whole situation, I think it was just high-school-senior-goes-away-to-college-wanting-to-go-home homesickness. It wasn't that I didn't like the ROTC program, but I was just having troubles adapting to all the changes, like most college freshmen. Long story short, a few months or so ago I gave up my scholarship and transferred to a state school. I got 45 credits from AP that Stanford wouldn't give me, so I guess it is not that bad of a deal. However, I am beginning to regret this. Kids here clearly don't care, yet they all think they're going to be orthopedic surgeons. I can't stand being around baselessly arrogant little toads. At Stanford, everyone was truly intelligent, so the atmosphere was one of intellectual stimulation, not trying (and failing) to show off.

    Anyways, my question boils down to this: Is there any possibility to go back to the ROTC unit at Stanford/Berkeley/UCLA with the scholarship after having dropped out? I did leave on good terms, for what that's worth. Also, I did voluntarily drop out, I was never approached and told to leave (in fact, it was quite the opposite). Thoughts? Thanks so much.
     
  2. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Not very likely.

    You could go back to Stanford, if the let you back in, on your own dime as a ROTC College Programmer and hope for a side load scholarship in the future. This of course would depend on whether they let you join the program again.

    I sure wouldn't use the "Arrogant little toads" argument on why you want to return.
     
  3. ERAUMattmom

    ERAUMattmom Member

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    +1
     
  4. ABF

    ABF Member

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    "I can't stand being around baselessly arrogant little toads. At Stanford, everyone was truly intelligent, so the atmosphere was one of intellectual stimulation, not trying (and failing) to show off."

    Before you make another quick decision that will greatly affect your future, perhaps a "gut check" is in order. Maybe you made the right decision in the first place...?

    Being an officer candidate isn't about tuition for a prestigious university, nor should it facilitate someone's belief they should be among the elite of a prestigious university. It's about service to your country and leading the sons and daughters of this nation... some of which might be those "arrogant toads" at the state school.
     
  5. 2018Class

    2018Class Member

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    I am curious to know if you even want a career in the military.

    Did you accept the scholarship in the beginning because it was a way to pay for the education at an expensive school and not because your desire was to serve our country as a leader in the military? If that is the case, then you will probably be miserable if you joined again. It won't be any different.

    You said that you always hoped to attend a top college and nowhere in your post do I get the impression that you desire a military career. You might be happier pursuing what interests you and not a path that will simply pay for your education.
     
  6. Roughrider

    Roughrider Member

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    The following is the advice I would give my son, if he came to be in this predicament and described it in this way:

    Grow the hell up.

    In my experience, this behavior is NOT, as you say, like "most college freshmen." Not even close. Most college freshman would be delighted to have your innate intelligence, and to be given an opportunity to get a respectable education at an affordable price -- TWICE, now, in two different institutions.

    I suggest you try to extend to your fellow students at your state university (and I have news for you, some of the arrogant little toads probably are going to become orthopedic surgeons. Life's not an intellectual meritocracy. Get used to it.) the same level of grace and respect that was extended to you by the ROTC guys at Stanford -- who were evidently faster, stronger, and more committed to a military career, and had a better understanding of the challenges thereof, than you did, and yet did not indicate that they couldn't stand being around you. Consider the possibility that one or two of those guys worked their butts off, maybe unsuccessfully, for a scholarship that you applied for on an apparent whim and then returned because the process of earning it was more humbling than you expected it to be.

    I'm aghast that you could even consider asking the army to allocate another $36,000 or more toward a cadet who has already shown himself to be underprepared mentally and physically, at the expense of more prepared and committed cadets. I'll be equally aghast (if not terribly surprised, the Federal government being what it is) if they do.
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    In agreement with all the above.

    1. You are now perceived as a quitter. How will you turn that around? What unpleasant experiences have you stuck through since leaving? How will you convince them you will stick it out this time?

    2. The monies have already gone elsewhere. They haven't kept it in an envelope hoping you would return.

    3. You haven't mentioned how you have turned yourself around physically, athletically, or (as you say) aggressively since you left. These are elements that even you perceive as important to success. How have you addressed them since leaving? How do you demonstrate them in your life now?

    Have fun at Big State U! :thumb:

    PS. If you don't like hanging out with "arrogant little toads", then I suggest finding another group to hang out with. If you can't find any groups that aren't "arrogant little toads", then perhaps you should begin to look at the element all these groups hold in common.

    Some choices you make in life cannot be undone. An unkind word, a decision to take one opportunity over another, and a decision to walk away from a situation... all could be cast in concrete once they happen.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2014
  8. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    Head over to your Arizona Big State U NROTC unit and enroll in the unit. You might eventually receive a side load scholarship. If you decide that your fellow mids in your unit are ALSO "baselessly arrogant little toads"....then forget about the Navy altogether....it definitely isn't for you.
     
  9. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    JCleppe correctly analyzed your prospects, in my opinion, and Aglages offered great advice, that is, assuming you're really interested in being trained to serve as a naval officer.

    One more thing: if I'm going to be sliced open and hacked by an orthopedic surgeon, I sure as hell want them to be arrogant - at the minimum supremely confident - that they know what they're doing.
     
  10. Tigger

    Tigger Member

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    ar·ro·gant adjective \ˈer-ə-gənt, ˈa-rə-\
    : having or showing the insulting attitude of people who believe that they are better, smarter, or more important than other people : having or showing arrogance

    com·pe·tent adjective \ˈkäm-pə-tənt\
    : having the necessary ability or skills : able to do something well or well enough to meet a standard

    I'd go with competent...every single time:wink:
     
  11. ERAUMattmom

    ERAUMattmom Member

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    Kinnem -

    Some choices you make in life cannot be undone. An unkind word, a decision to take one opportunity over another, and a decision to walk away from a situation... all could be cast in concrete once they happen.

    I hope it's OK for me to steal this from you and put it in MY book of quotes that I started off copying from you...
     
  12. Roughrider

    Roughrider Member

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    What is done cannot be undone.

    -- Shakespeare, Macbeth, iii.ii 12

    Kinnem said it better.
     
  13. Packer

    Packer Member

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    Kinnem>Shakespeare :thumb:
     
  14. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Jeez. Now I'm embarrassed. No way did I express something better than Shakespeare. And yes, I will not sue anyone for violations of copyright law if they decide to use it. An old friend of mine once said "To sue, or not to sue. That is the question." Well, I've made my decision and it's now cast in concrete. :rolleyes:
     
  15. Sampia

    Sampia Member

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    I do not think we should get caught up in his one unfortunate choice of phrase in referring to his college peers. Finding one's place in life can be difficult and especially for someone who may have trouble fitting in with those who are more athletically inclined.

    OP, did you research the different types of branches? My son started out in the Air Force ROTC and they did not require much athleticism. He seldom was yelled at and it was nothing at all like Boot Camp. That is part of the reason he switched to the Marines. To hear him talk, the Air Force cadets are practically babied! Whatever path you take, you are going to have to learn to get along with people of all shapes and sizes and intellects and personalities. I do not want to preach to you, but just be aware that just because someone may not be as smart as you, he may have a heart of gold.

    My guess is you are having a hard time fitting in. You are not the first freshman to turn around and run back home and you will not be the last. First, you should search your soul and find out if you do want to be in the military. Four years of what might be considered hell by you would not be worth the cost of going to a top-notch college.
     
  16. Roughrider

    Roughrider Member

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    Agree whole-heartedly with the bolded.

    It's never, ever, ever, ever, there are not enough evers, a good idea to make a major commitment based on "what the hell," or "why not", or (my personal undoing), "how hard can it be?" The ROTC deal is not just 4 years of education; it's 5 years of military leadership after that, probably under far more stressful conditions than your first semester in college. Think long and hard about whether becoming a naval officer is what you want. If what you want is intellectual stimulation, lose the attitude and do something about it. Look into transferring to the honors college at your state university. Apply for undergraduate research opportunities. Sign up for internships. Do a senior capstone project or write an undergraduate thesis. Cultivate a relationship with potential mentors. Take some graduate level classes. Join Engineers without Borders, the SPEED team, the Phi Beta Kappa society, the gaming club, the chess team, or whatever else cranks your tractor. Form a book discussion group. You don't need to go back to Stanford to find people at your intellectual level.

    Good luck.

    RR
     
  17. UndeadPoet

    UndeadPoet DS - AROTC/AFROTC Winner

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    +1 :smile:

    Kinnem="Bard?"
     

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