Giving up a NROTC Scholarship

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by s1732, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. s1732

    s1732 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    For those of you in the know - what is the difference between a student leaving NROTC as a 'Drop on Request' or being disenrolled by the NROTC unit during a student's freshman year? Are there financial implications of one over the other? Thanks!
     
  2. aglages

    aglages Parent

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    4
    At the risk of over simplifying the issue: In the first case (Drop on Request) the student is indicating that he is voluntarily choosing to leave the NROTC program. In the second case (disenrollment) the Navy is telling the student "No thanks, we don't want you".

    If the student is attending college on a NROTC scholarship and is in his first (freshman) year then he can leave the program (or be disenrolled) without financial penalty. He will of course lose his scholarship. After the first day of classes during the second year.....there is a "financial implication".

    Financial implication aside, if the student ever wants to join the Navy as an officer in the future he should definitely choose to "drop on request" to keep that option available.
     
  3. s1732

    s1732 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks! I passed your reply on to the person who was asking on the navyformoms forum. She says "To whomever answered you 'Thank you so much for the explanation. I really appreciate it.'"
     
  4. aglages

    aglages Parent

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    4
    You (and she) are welcome. How come there isn't a Navyfordads forum?:wink:
     
  5. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,826
    Likes Received:
    2
    Not necessarily. It is going to depend on the reason for the separation. This applies to SA's as well.

    In any case, if any separation occurs during the first year there is no financial liability.
     
  6. aglages

    aglages Parent

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    4
    True. However, if given a choice, then "drop on request" would usually be preferable. :cool:
     
  7. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,826
    Likes Received:
    2
    Is this an assumption or do you know this from personal experience?

    Not to nitpick but you didn't say preferable, in your above post. You said "definitely".
     
  8. aglages

    aglages Parent

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    4
    I did say definitely and that is what I meant. If the student ever wants to join the Navy as an officer in the future he should definitely choose to "drop on request" to keep that option available. Notice I also said choose? While it may be possible to be disenrolled from ROTC and still become an officer, the circumstances that would allow that to happen are limited and would IMHO require a much more involved explanation than voluntarily choosing to "drop on request".

    In answer to the first part of your question, no I have never been disenrolled or chosen to drop out of a ROTC program. Do you have some personal experience in regards to this question? If so perhaps you could share the details and describe how you managed to later get commissioned. I am sure the details of your story would be of great value to the OP.
     
  9. s1732

    s1732 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Related to this topic: Does anyone know about how many mids on scholarship drop out of NROTC during their first year? I imagine that the retention rate varies quite a bit from unit to unit.
     
  10. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,826
    Likes Received:
    2
    aglages - you are making a blanket statement about variable circumstances.
    There are lots of reasons why a NROTC mid (or ROTC cadet) might be separated or DOR. Some reasons are Unsatisfactory Academic Performance, Legal trouble, Violation of UCMJ, Disciplined by their college for violation (i.e. violating the college's honor code or underage drinking), being suspended by the college or even lack of adjustment to military life.
    Some of those would reasons would make becoming a Naval Officer in the future a long haul - even if the Mid DOR's to avoid the involuntary separation.
    DOR is not a sure thing back in - it can be looked upon as quitting when the going got rough.
    If a midshipman is separated due to a low GPA or lack of adjustment often it is a maturity issue not an issue that prevents future officership.
    Not everyone takes a straight line to becoming an officer.

    Specifically, last year I heard of a young woman who was disenrolled from NROTC for not passing physics. She was not a freshman and was looking at a very hefty bill for her tuition to pay back. Apparently the Navy prefers the money not the time by enlisting. She was actually able to switch to AROTC and her time served as an Army officer will suffice for her Navy commitment.
     
  11. aglages

    aglages Parent

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    4
    My "blanket statement about variable circumstances" was that a ROTC cadet should definitely choose DOR over Disenrollment. While I agree with you that a cadet can still be an officer (in the Army?) after being disenrolled from NROTC, it does not address the question of which choice should be made if given an option. Under what circumstances would you choose disenrollment over DOR if you had a choice?

    BTW - I have a close friend whose daughter was a NROTC scholarship cadet and chose to DOR because of academic reasons during her first year. She was told that if she was serious about being a Navel officer she'd be much better off if she DOR' than if she waited for the Navy to disenroll her. She was later commissioned in the Navy after getting her grades together and graduating....supposedly without problems.
     
  12. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,826
    Likes Received:
    2
    DOR implies quitting. No one "chooses" disenrollment. It is the result of something gone awry.
    I think either way it's a tough call - if one is having academic trouble and there is a chance of pulling through would you advise to DOR and quit just because it's hard? Or sticking it out, doing your best and taking a chance?
    It all depends on the degree of difficulty and the situation. If the mid is in trouble - like caught underage drinking and then chooses to DOR - this probably won't help since the violation occurred while he was a Mid.
    Your friend's daughter could have been given great advice or maybe it would not have mattered. If her cadre thought separation was a sure bet then by DOR she certainly made it easier for all.
    Q - did she go back to ROTC as a non-scholarship mid or commission through OCS?
    Being separated for academic difficulty is not a part of your military record and does not preclude either enlisting or commissioning in the future. This goes for ROTC and the SA's as well.

    A year or two ago, I read an article in the Pointer View (West Point's newspaper) about an Army Officer at West Point who attended the Naval Academy. He was separated in the spring of his senior year after playing football for Navy for 4 years. The article didn't say why he was separated but he took his credits, got a degree and joined the Army. He was a Major at that time.
    My point is - unless the separation was for a serious violation of military or civil code - it is often possible to take another path to officership if one truly desires.
     
  13. aglages

    aglages Parent

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    4
    As I understand it, she did not go back to ROTC as a non-scholarship mid. She instead managed to improve her grades (perhaps without the time demands of NROTC) and then applied for a Navy commission after graduating.
     
  14. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,826
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gotcha -

    A couple of other things to keep in mind -
    If a Mid (or Cadet) is at risk of being separated, they might want to DOR if they have been told separation is a sure thing or they don't want to wait for the board. However, it often is not a sure thing - their record will go before a board who will render a decision. Some might want to hang on to see if they will be retained and given a chance for remediation.

    Also, losing one's scholarship for academic reasons doesn't necessarily mean separation from ROTC. If your GPA falls too low you can lose your scholarship but still remain in ROTC and contract.
     

Share This Page