grad school.

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by mid101, Jul 16, 2011.

  1. mid101

    mid101 New Member

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    Will DOD help fund or at least assist in the payment of my tuition at a top MBA program after my 5 year obligation? I always believed that I would make a career out of the military and who knows? I just might, but recently I have taken a profound interest in management consulting and private equity and even investment banking. I am also interested in working for CIA with my MBA but am leaning towards the private sector. Does the DOD have opportunities for retired military officers who want to further their education?
     
  2. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Yes, grad school for an MBA is an option. Many ways to do it, if you wanted to do it after getting out you could use the post 9/11 GI bill to help fund it.
     
  3. mid101

    mid101 New Member

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    Thank you sir,


    did some research on the Post 9/11 GI Bill. I am a bit confused on how DOD decides how much money to give towards tuition if a student were to attend a private university like Harvard or Wharton.
     
  4. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Department of Defense or Department of Veterans Affairs? Services spend the money on tuition assistance...not DOD and the Post-9/11 GI Bill is administered and paid for by the VA, which is not DOD.
     
  5. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Also, if you're coming from an academy as your commissioning source, you will not be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill following your 5 year commitment.

    In addition to the GI bill, some schools also maintain a Yellow Ribbon Program (like my grad school, George Washington University...which has been very supportive of active duty and vets). With the Yellow Ribbon Program, a school offsets there difference between the VA coverage from a GI bill and the tuition. I haven't had to use the YRP, especially with the changes to the GI bill, but it's nice to know it's there.
     
  6. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Unless you know something I don't I think this is incorrect. Academy grads were not elgible for the Montgomery GI Bill; however, the post-9/11 bill does include them. (Maybe you have to serve beyond the initial obligation?)
     
  7. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Correct, beyond the min. obligation. Not exactly sure how far after. CGA used to have a loophole which I was able to take advantage of. That changed last year. It's beyond the 5. Maybe 8? Maybe longer.
     
  8. Malachy Marine

    Malachy Marine Member

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    In order to be eligible for the full Post-9/11 GI Bill, you must serve 36 months of time on active duty from date of entry. Those from the SAs clock on the 36 months does not start ticking down until after their minimum obligated service is completed. Theres also an amendment pending for the fall session of Congress that might actually reduce the benefits for veterans, in terms of the housing allowance, book stipend, and tuition covered by the VA.
     
  9. mid101

    mid101 New Member

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    Thanks to all of you,
    I'm not sure what I want to do but hell, I got 8+ years to make up my mind.
     
  10. BillSL

    BillSL USMA Class of 2016

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    The commitment is considered the 5 Active Duty years or all 8? I am a little confused right now.
     
  11. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    The basic obligation is 8 years total, with 5 years active and 3 years reserve.

    So if you graduate, serve 5 years in active duty then resign, you still have to serve 3 years in the reserves. Your options for serving in the reserves are IRR (individual ready reserve), where no active participation is required or joining Army Reserve or Army National Guard, where you will drill one weekend a month and 15 days of training. The 911 changes everything as it used to be if a service academy graduate will resign after 5 years and join the IRR, and have nothing to do with the military. Now, there is different requirement on what you do during year 6 to 8. The Army also experimented with with additional ADSO (active duty service obligation), giving additional benefits (i.e. picking branch, grad school, and etc). This changes so you will have to wait until you graudate, to see what options are there.
     
  12. BillSL

    BillSL USMA Class of 2016

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    Thanks, MemberLG. That clears a lot of things up!
     

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