How does Army ROTC handle cadets who can't graduate in 4 years?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by bsherman92, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. bsherman92

    bsherman92 Member

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    Hello there. I am a sophomore enrolled as an MSII, although it is my first year of AROTC (I asked the cadre about this and it seems they allow freshly-enrolled sophomores to directly go on to MSII because, apparently, MSII includes everything from MSI with a little extra material). My major is mechanical engineering and it requires a total of 131 credits for graduation. Back when I was still a senior in high school, by the time I applied to college, the AP credits I had were mostly humanities classes and not any of the core math/science classes (except Calculus AB). Therefore, most of my credits were, by default, inapplicable to the actual degree. I also had no extra specialty programs (such as taking a few courses at the community college) that would have granted me college credits. So in effect, I started the Mech. Engineering courseload at the very bottom tier. This doesn't mean I can't graduate in 4 years; if I decided to attend summer and winter classes (of which this past summer I did complete 2 classes), I could in fact make it in time with the class of 2014. We also follow a priority scheduling program; certain students take precedence when getting their schedule: athletes, notably, and anyone in the honors college, which I am not a member of. It also, unfortunately, goes by alphabetical order for last names. Priority scheduling is a huge advantage for some students here. I, unfortunately, do not get any priority scheduling benefits and that has forced me to register for 3 credits less last semester than I intended to because every seat for the class I wanted was filled. Also, as you probably know, most majors have pre-requisites and co-requisites which inevitably force you to wait a whole semester to take the next level class if you didn't play smart with the scheduling (You HAVE to go in order of Calc 1 -> Calc 2 -> Calc 3 -> Differential Equations -> Linear Algebra, etc)

    I'd just like to know how Army ROTC would handle cadets who may need an extra semester or 2 to graduate. Is it school specific? Is it extremely hard to request that your commission date be pushed back a semester? Is it likely they will lose their commission? I plan to make it in 4.5 years because summers for AROTC is usually filled by at least something: LDAC, additional training, extra schooling, unplanned meetings, and for SMP cadets, basic and/or AIT. Sorry if this has been asked before: I've seen this answered for AFROTC, but not specifically for Army ROTC, unless I didn't search correctly. Thank you, I really appreciate it.
     
  2. singaporemom

    singaporemom Member

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    Dont know the answer to that, but my DS took summer school prior to freshman year and in between freshman/sophomore year. He had no commitments that were required of him until LDAC. He also meets with his AROTC "counselor' (dont really know who this is, and his major counselor twice a semester. this helps him straighten out any issues. Also, helped him double dip his classes....made sure that everything he took satisfied more than one requirement for his major and 2 minors. Get with a counselor ASAP, they are there to help.
     
  3. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    You will be what is called a completion cadet. If you have completed all your ROTC requirements, but haven't graduated you will still be contracted to commission. If you were at Clarkson we would expect you to stay in contact with us, continue to do PT and pass your PT tests, but focus on your academics to complete your degree. The key will be an accurate 104r (academic plan) and making sure your cadre know what year group you are in. If they don't want to work with you I know a really good Engineering school you could look into transferring to.
     
  4. MNDad2015

    MNDad2015 Member

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    DS is a CE major and everyone has been very straight forward with him from the beginning that with that and AROTC he should plan on at least 4.5 years to graduate. His initial 104r that he put together, reviewed with his MSI instructor and AA puts him on that path. Bottom line is they all want to see him succeed but not overload himself in doing so. As clarksonarmy pointed out, if they're not willing to work with you, then it's time to find a better place. If you would like my suggestion for a great school for both Engineering and AROTC, send me a PM and I'll be happy to oblige.
     
  5. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    Ii think it really just depends on major and program. My 104-R turned out to be 4.5 years as well because I was in the nursing program. Since you are a engineering major I really don't see it being a problem because that is a rather difficult major. They might offer you LTC to make up those two years or pay for extra MILS SCI credits if you do compression. Honestly, ARTOC is completely full of poly sci, history, CJ majors (not knocking them), so I honestly think they would work with you seeing that you are putting in the time to go engineering.Did you also know there are incentives points for branching and OML by being an engineer? If you can keep up your GPA, you are set.
     
  6. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    You mentioned earlier that you were hoping to branch in the Medical Branch, you state here that tou were in the nursing program, was that the Army Nursing program that requires you to branch nursing or were you in an indepenent nursing program. Just curious so others looking at the nursing program might be able to understand the difference. Thanks.
     
  7. bsherman92

    bsherman92 Member

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    Excellent advice everyone... I really appreciate it. I'll speak about this with the cadre but it's good to know that the situation can be handled. Thank you all.
     
  8. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    Now don't go recruiting for RIT :yllol:
     
  9. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    Yes the Army Nurse Corps is a sub branch (has its own collar insignia) within AMEDD/Army Medical Corps. Essentially if you accept a nursing scholarship rather than a line scholarship you will be branching Nurse Corps upon commissioning (if you fail your NCLEX boards after graduation then you are branch according to the "needs of the army" eeeeeeek). From what I understand you are able to branch transfer out of the nursing corps after 4 years if you so choose and attend that respective branch's CCC (Captains Career Course). I have even seen ranger tabbed nurses so it is possible to float around haha

    With civilian pay in my area a lot higher than the military for nurses with a few years experience it has been in the past very hard to keep nurses for O-4 and above. Although, the army does have a lot of masters/doctorate programs which helps improve retention (I hope to take the CRNA incentive/education path... 157k average salary in my area.... and continue serving in the reserves :0 )
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2011

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