How should I dress for my AROTC interview?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by sjbd94, Aug 29, 2011.

  1. sjbd94

    sjbd94 Member

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    I have my army ROTC interview later this week at UNC and was wondering how i should dress. I have my interview in the morning and then a tour of the school later that day. I was wondering if khaki shorts and a polo is to casual or should i go for the khaki dress pants and the full button up long sleeve collared shirt?
     
  2. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    One thing to realize if you opt to wear a collared shirt, depending how hot Raleigh is that day you may show up sweating, and that is not the 1st impression you want to give.

    Ironed khakis and a nice polo will be better than a collared shirt stuck to your body.
     
  4. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    Anything wrong with a knee-length skirt and white blouse? :yllol: It would help to know if the OP is male or female LOL
     
  5. Adam E.

    Adam E. T3Black

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    I'd wear a collared shirt and pants at a minimum. Don't know why that link suggests not wearing a suit? Personally that's what I'd be wearing. First impression is EVERYTHING.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Just assuming the reason why they do not request a suit is because not everyone at the age of 17 own suits, thus to ask a parent to spend money on a suit to wear only 1X for an hour or so could cause a fiscal strain on the family...remember 9% of Americans are unemployed right now.

    The attire is not going to make or break you, unless you are going to walk in with holes in your jeans, a tee shirt and rainbows. Walk in wearing neat clothing will be just fine.

    They are only going to remember you by your credentials and how the interview went. In other words you will never hear them say: Take the kid with the suit, because he was the only one to wear one, even though we didn't request it.

    They will say: The kid that was an Eagle Scout with a 1400 SAT (out of 1600) and also is on LAX was the best candidate of the day.

    Don't over think what to wear it will just amp up your nerves.

    Also don't over think the interview. They know you are just a HS kid, and they understand for many you will fell like your life is riding on it. Just be you and you will do great!
     
  7. Adam E.

    Adam E. T3Black

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    So the kid is going to wear the suit 1 time the whole year? I agree that if you walk in looking like a circus clown then yes, that will negatively impact you. My point was just that why go half-way when you can essentially eliminate a variable (first impression). For many applicants this will be a career for them, and to me at least, why not show the Army how serious you are about joining? To each his own though...
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Adam, for many kids yes, they are only going to wear it one time. My son owned a suit, because we went to a wedding that yr., but he never wore it again until 2 yrs later when he interned on the hill for a Sen. He has never worn a suit again in the past 2 yrs. after the internship. Blues, yes, Mess Dress, yes, but not a suit.

    He also applied for the AFA, and did not wear a suit to any of his interviews, but got all the noms. For all of his interviews he wore khakis and collared shirts with boat decks. The only kids that did wear suits at the interview, wore their ROTC uniforms.

    You are right, if that is how you feel you should do it, however, I do not want kids to feel that they need to purchase a suit to make a good impression or get max points.

    Plus, anyone who has gone through the process will tell you that if you are not use to wearing a suit, don't do it. There is nothing more distracting than watching a kid squirm in his seat because he didn't know how to sit in a coat jacket or pulling on his neck because the tie is bothering him. If you have decided you will wear one and are unaccustomed to it put it on the day before and get accustomed to it.
     
  9. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

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    I think there are two important messages you want to send to the interviewer, which will be reflected in the clothing you wear at the interview:

    1. You consider the interview and the scholarship to be very important. You don't need a suit to do this, but if you have one and are able to think on your feet while wearing it (Pima's point above about comfort is really important), then wear it. Nice slacks and a polo shirt are fine, too. But do not show up with sloppy cargo shorts and a tank top (you'd be surprised how many applicants do that). In short, what you wear will send a strong message to the interviewer about your sense of judgment. My DS wore a suit because he had one from his last school dance, but many many many have done just fine without one.

    2. You are willing to be a conformist and "fit in" to military culture. The officer corps in the military is very conservative when it comes to dress. As such, I would avoid wearing "the latest fashion" from Paris or wearing something that makes a "statement." Instead, wear something that most 40-50 year olds are "used" to seeing in church or somewhere other than an amusement park. If you wear something that looks weird or sloppy, it will send a message that you consider your own personal views to be more important than the military. As you know, the military isn't big on "individuality" and trying to force that, through an unwritten "statement" reflected in your clothing, might send an unfavorable message about your judgment and whether you will ultimately "fit in."
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    To add onto this topic, for the girls:

    1. Remember if you wear nail polish, make sure it is not chipped or out there colors, unless you can do it to show some type of school pride...i.e. I am sure if you went to UNCCH, and wore Tarheel Blue, the interviewer would think it was cute, and may even use it as an ice breaking subject...Oh Ms. Smith I like that Blue on your fingers. Showing up with your nails in Blue Devil Blue wouldn't be wise!:eek::shake:

    2. Be mindful of your shoe selection.
    Yes, heels are fine, but remember feet begin to hurt in heels, and although they may look great with the outfit, it won't help you at all if you are saying ums, uhs, during the interview because all you can think of is that you can't wait to take them off!

    If you buy new heels, break them in. Remember to scratch the soles on concrete because you maybe walking on carpeting (not pile, indoor/outdoor type) and you don't want to slip or trip into the interviewers arms

    3. Skirt length
    Practice sitting down in a chair in front of your folks to see how short the skirt goes when you sit down, and how it moves/rides up when you cross/uncross your legs.
    Current styles out there may be below the fingertip, which is usually the school rules, but not what you would wear in the military and that can be distracting.

    In other words just because when you are standing up you look great, doesn't mean that the same will be said when you sit.

    4. Jewelry
    If you have multiple ear piercings or body piercings, bring it down to just a pr in your ears, and make them simple studs, nothing out there...no big hoops or dangling things

    Don't wear a necklace or bracelets. Traditionally girls will start playing with these items unconsciously, and again it is a distraction to the person who is interviewing. Plus if you wear multiple bracelets they make noise every time you move your wrist, again it could be annoying to the interviewer.

    5. Hair
    For girls I think it is different than guys. Interviewers don't expect guys to come in with reg. haircuts, but let's be honest how much can a guy style his hair anyway.

    For girls, if you have one of the hottest new trends of a feather in your hair, depending on where it is and what color, you may want to remove it. Our DD has one, but it is close to her hair color and actually if she wants to hide it she can just tuck it behind her ears and nobody would ever see it. Now if it was blue or hot pink even than it would be visible.

    A friends DD had a bleach streak behind her hair, and her interview was in October, she had it died pink. She made it a point in the interview to tell them that her mother had breast cancer, and it was breast cancer month, so she died it in support of that cause. She got a scholarship, and I am sure that pink streak, although not commonly acceptable, was a plus for her interview. They did ask what color she does the 11 other months of the yr, she said she dies it back to her natural color.

    Remember in the military girls all have regs regarding their hair and how it is worn.

    Finally for both guys and girls, although I know legally you are suppose to be 18 before you get a tat, but if you have one cover it up! So if that means you wear a long sleeve shirt because it isn't covered wearing a short sleeve shirt, than so be it. Regs in the military are NO VISIBLE tats when in uniform.
     
  11. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    I would tell you that the chances of the person you are going to be interviewing with will probably be in ACUs and is not going to expect you to be wearing a suit. I don't advocate blindly conforming, but sometimes trying to set yourself apart from the crowd by trying to show up your peers is an indicator of future issues. The terms "Blue Falcon" and "Spotlight Ranger" come to mind with regards to this topic.

    Here is the Army tattoo policy...doesn't say not visible in uniform, just not on face, head, or neck

    Army policy prohibits any tattoos or brands on the face, head or neck above the class-A shirt collar. Current policy for the hands only authorizes small innocuous tattoos or brands that are not prejudicial to the good order or discipline within Army units and do not detract from a professional military appearance.

    If you've got lots of tattoos on the arms hopefully you don't interview with someone who doesn't appreciate ink.
     

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