How steep will the climb be? (DQ's)

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by zulu_, Jul 21, 2015.

  1. zulu_

    zulu_ New Member

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    I'm just looking through my medical history, and I want to get opinions on the severity of my situation. As it turns out, I was diagnosed with RAD before the age of 13. I've never been diagnosed with asthma, nor have I ever needed to take daily preventative medication. It is not exercise induced; as a matter of fact, exercising always seems to relieve my symptoms. I only showed mild symptoms maybe once a year in my childhood, and that would be only after the onset of a cold / URI. The last episode where I needed urgent care was a month after my thirteenth birthday, which may complicate things. The only times I was prescribed inhalers past age 13 was when I got URI's / colds / coughs. I am an active runner / sprinter for two seasons of the year and my lungs have never held me back. I will probably see a pulmonologist to take a functions test to clear up / amend the diagnosis, and will have it cleared through my primary care physician. Also, I have not begun the medical process through DoDMERB yet, and I want to deal with as much as I can beforehand. When I check 'yes' for asthma/wheezing, I want to have supporting documents stating that I am clear, hopefully to avoid the entire DQ / waiver process. Lying is not an option.

    In addition to the RAD diagnosed in my childhood, I am on medication for hypothyroidism (caused by Hashimoto's). It is stable with a very mild dosage of Synthroid (112mcg). I am not symptomatic (i.e. tiredness, decreased metabolism, weight gain), so hopefully this will not be that large of a hurdle.
     
  2. MammaMia

    MammaMia Member

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    Zulu, "current hypothyroidism" is disqualifying (code is D131.90). That you are taking medication for hypothyroidism (at any dosage level - and 112 mcg is in the normal range for an adult) may confirm that it's a current issue; on the other hand, since it's controlled by medication, perhaps it's not considered "current." A DQ is not necessarily the end of the road, though. The following thread may be helpful: http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?threads/hypothyroidism.38685/#post-379436.
     
  3. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    You might want to search this forum as there has been much discussion about asthma. As a general rule, if you have it after the age of 13, it is a DQ and unlikely to be waived, at least for USNA/NROTC.

    Before you spend a lot of time with your personal physician, you might want to contact DODMERB and/or your SA/ROTC program of choice to figure out what should be the next steps. DODMERB will likely request some sort of remedial -- which could include additional tests. I don't know if they will accept tests done outside of their "network" or tests done before you receive the remedial; someone else can probably provide more info.

    Best of luck to you!
     
  4. zulu_

    zulu_ New Member

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    Looks like my hypothyroidism is controlled. Looking at this document, http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/613003p.pdf, controlled hypothyroidism isn't a disqualification, although I may need to do a couple of blood tests beforehand.
     
  5. MammaMia

    MammaMia Member

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    That's certainly encouraging! Good luck to you!
     
  6. zulu_

    zulu_ New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. Here's what the medical standards doc says: d. 'reliably diagnosed and symptomatic after the 13th birthday.' My RAD has never been diagnosed after I turned 13, and I've only shown symptoms once. I think I might have a few things going for me, however.
    (2) Individuals DO MEET the standard if within the past 3 years they meet ALL of the criteria in subparagraphs 11.d.(2)(a)-(d).
    '(a) No use of controller or rescue medications (including, but not limited to inhaled corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, or short-acting beta agonists).' Have not used any medications in the past three years. One inhaler was prescribed (parents did it out of caution) but was never used.
    '(b) No exacerbations requiring acute medical treatment.' I haven't received medical treatment any time in the past three years.
    '(c) No use of oral steroids.' Not in the past three years.
    '(d) A current normal spirometry (within the past 90 days), performed in accordance with American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines and as defined by current National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) standards.' I'll take one of these.

    I'm thinking that I meet the criteria. Only issue is that one inhaler that was prescribed, but never used. It was never refilled / re-prescribed ect. I doubt that the DoD would believe "Well, I never used it." That's the only thing worrying me right now. Also, If I do meet the standard for all of these criteria, do I still need to go through the waiver process? Or will they clear me on the spot if I the have sufficient paperwork from my physician clearing me and a good spirometry / PFT?
     
  7. Kronk

    Kronk Member

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    Get a pulminologist to write off on a spirometry. I can NOT stress that enough.
    I met all those criteria, and my primary care even removed asthma from my problems list based on my spirometry yet I was still DQed for having it in my medical history after 13, and an inhaler prescribed (but not used).

    I was DQed and sent for a remedial by AROTC.
    I went to a pulminologist for a spirometry. Performed that well and was luckily waived.
     

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