how to complete History Form when anticipating a DQ

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by A6E Dad, Jul 8, 2016.

  1. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad Member

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    Just beginning the DODMERB process, and since we're expecting a DQ, and that son will require a waiver, need to make sure we do this correctly. I say "we" because, even though this is HIS application, the DODMERB process seems to be a minefield and I feel like this is one area where he could use some help to prevent future problems.

    As I understand it, any positive response to a "Have you ever had" question for anything on the list of "history of" disqualifying issues is an automatic DQ, regardless of current condition etc. So, I expect that by answering "yes", we will get a DQ notice and be asked for Remedials, correct? Then after sending the remedials, they will review the add'l details and then re-confirm the DQ, and only after that would the SA consider request a waiver, correct?

    So, my question is, how much of the potential "Remedial" info, and eventual "Waiver support" documentation should be submitted in the first go round? Ie. writeup from doctor about the condition (this is orthopedic), treatment, recovery and current status? Opinion of the doctor regarding severity, current condition, likelihood of recurrence, and all the info that they would probably want to see.
    I'm sort of thinking that I should save those bullets for when asked for them - Is that wise?

    Also, does question 32 (Asthma) require a 'yes' answer, if there was an initial diagnosis by primary care, that was later confirmed by a pulmonologist as definitively NOT asthma? (ie. we anticipated that asthma would be a problem, and made sure to demand that the testing was definitive. they actually did pulmonary function tests as well as methocholine challenge test that confirmed there was NO asthma). In that case, is it appropriate to state "NO" to the asthma question?

    While I do want to avoid raising the issue if that is the correct thing to do, I don't want to create a problem if/when ALL records are requested, and they eventually see a record of the asthma testing and wonder why it wasn't reported.

    Only one chance to get this right, so appreciate any info or advice

    thank you
     
  2. AJC

    AJC Member

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    Be honest. But a yes answer will trigger some action.
    No remedial information can be provided prior to the request.
    The DoDMERB website has a flow chart of the process.
    Some history gets cleared without DQ.
    The list of mandatory DQ conditions is out there...
    They will ask for what they need to evaluate. provide what is requested but volunteer nothing.
    As for the asthma question, if the diagnosis in the end was not asthma then a nswer no.
    Like my Navy recruiter told me; NO stands for New Opportunities
     
  3. Gabe518

    Gabe518 New Member

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    Be honest but with the recent military cutbacks waivers are hard to get
     
  4. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    It is my belief that the good parents should always be actively involved in important decisions and activities in their children's lives. You provide guidance, support and assistance when needed. There is a fine line between being a good parent and a helicopter parent. The DoDMERB process is one that requires guidance especially if your child's medical history is complicated. It looks like you are well informed, just remember these are your child's answers.

    Just because you answer "yes" to a question does not mean you will be automatically DQ. I had originally thought that a "yes" would require some sort of supporting documentation, but from my DS experience, it is not the case. Specifically he checked "yes" to acne since it was in his medical history. His response was "Mild adolescent acne, no medication or medical treatment necessary". He had sinusitis, response sinusitis on xx/xx resolved with antibiotics, no reoccurrence. A few weeks after his medical exam he got "Qualified" in the mail. The responses were truthful and they addressed the standard. DQ is chronic sinusitis, DS had acute sinusitis, so we made sure that was in the response.

    How much additional information: I would not provide any supporting documentation with the medical history. I would only quote or reference that information in the responses to "yes". You could bring that information with you to the medical exam and possibly have the examining physician add that information into his report.

    I agree with @AJC No to asthma. He never had it since the specialist said he did not.

    The remedial could be a specific records request, a all records request, or additional testing required.
     
  5. 5Day

    5Day Member

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  6. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad Member

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    thanks for the info, seems the consensus is "no" on asthma, i'll double check the actual medical records to be sure of what is says first.

    re: the other stuff, i think i'll work on collecting all the records that are available, have the doctor info ready so if/when it's requested, but not put too much detail in the initial response. it seems that there are a lot of cases where it takes so long to get supporting documentation, that DQs get re-affirmed before all the info is reviewed.

    5day - appreciate the sentiment, but i view this process as different than writing an essay or working with teacher on recommendations etc. if it's considered good advice to engage a 'dodmerb consultant' to help with this process, then it's certainly appropriate for a parent to get very engaged in making sure it's done correctly. my son isn't even old enough to get his own records.

    i certainly appreciate all the info

    thanks
     
  7. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    @A6E Dad you took my comment the wrong way, or I wrote it poorly. You need to be involved. My only point is to make sure your child is part of the process, which I am sure they are.

    The "trick" is to put just the right amount of detail in the medical history form. You are well on your way. Best of luck.
     
  8. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad Member

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    5Day - no worries, we're saying the same thing

    I didn't attend USNA, but I did spend a fair amount of time in the Navy, so I know about medicals etc, and the notorious NAMI WHAMI, so you can never be too proactive

    thanks for the good wishes
     
  9. Dckc88

    Dckc88 Member

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    We anticipated a problem too, or at least the need for supporting documentation. My daughter marked yes seeking medical treatment for a joint problem and, related to that, she also marked yes to needing xray (it was an mri, with a negative result). She wrote in her description of the problem, "please see attached MRI report and also, please see PT memo describing treatment." The doctor doing the exam would not take her documentation. However, when Concorde collected the exam, since her statements said they were included, they asked my daughter for that documentation before sending it in to DODMERB. Now, to be clear, I am not advising you either way. I don't know the specific situation, I am not a doctor, and I do not work for DODMERB, I am just a parent like you. I do know that she did not need any further documentation for her shoulder, and we knew some shoulder issues can be disqualifying, or at least would trigger for remedials. It seemed to satisfy what they needed to show it wasn't a disqualifying condition and probably sped it up a little bit. However, if your son has a disqualifying condition, it is not going to matter if you send it in now or later, disqualifying conditions are black and white and it will be subject to a waiver. Also, not all yeses are disqualifying. I would definitely go through the conditions of which are disqualifying and which are not. So basically whether you should or should not, I do not have an opinion, but if you or your son wants to send in additional information, that worked for my daughter.
     
  10. EOD/SEALmom

    EOD/SEALmom Member

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    My daughter had several sports injuries (required short physical therapy) and several concussions, plus two medicine allergies - and she passed dodmerb with no DQ. She answered honestly and gave as much detail as possible. At the exam the doctor clarified some things, but never required any medical records.

    I think you're wise to try and track down the records early, but you might never need them. Good luck!
     
  11. CaliNavyMom

    CaliNavyMom Member

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    That "X-ray or radiation therapy" question confused even DH and I. I googled and there is such a thing as X-ray therapy, so we marked no on that one even though we marked yes for the Ortho due to a couple broken bones when younger, DS did have an X-ray for each of them(2). I guess the doctor will clarify.
     
  12. AggieWill

    AggieWill Member

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    I found some much older posts as I've done my research, and some DoDMERB docs/former docs commented on the X Ray question. To paraphrase, question 69 is referring to X-Ray Therapy, or Radiation Therapy, not a "routine" X-Ray. Looks like you'r "No" answer was the correct one!
     
  13. CaliNavyMom

    CaliNavyMom Member

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