Human Growth Hormone

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by ArapWarrior, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. ArapWarrior

    ArapWarrior Prospective

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    Is the prescribed use of Human Growth Hormone for Idiomatic Short Stature grounds for disqualification?

    I searched, but I was unable to find anything very helpful. Does anyone have any experience with this?

    Thank you
     
  2. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    It won't necessarily be the treatment with HGH as much as the diagnosis for which it is treating (Idiopathic Short Stature).

    There are certain height minimums and limits for each service which might trip you up if you are considered ISS. Personally I haven't had any experience with this particular diagnosis, so can't really give you a great answer.
     
  3. ArapWarrior

    ArapWarrior Prospective

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    I'm 5'7" now, and I don't know exactly what the diagnosis was, although I do not think it was ISS or growth hormone deficiency.

    Thank you for your response.
     
  4. supportivemom

    supportivemom Member

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    One of my sons also took HGH shots for ISS in his early teens. This was disclosed on his medical history forms. He was neither DQ'ed nor in need of a waiver. He's now a thriving youngster. Best of luck to you.
     
  5. ArapWarrior

    ArapWarrior Prospective

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    That's great news, thank you.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Arap, if you want to fly for the AF, it is about your sitting height and not so much your standing height. You may want to investigate if this will be an issue for your career choice.
     
  7. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    It will be your measurements as a 2/C (junior) that count -- at least for selecting flight. It's not uncommon for men and women's bodies to change/grow while at a SA. Thus, the fact you are "qualified" now may or may not be relevant come three years from now. However, if you aren't qualified now, you shouldn't assume that will change and, thus, should be prepared for an alternate career path within the service you choose.
     
  8. iwvaris

    iwvaris New Member

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    We just heard from the academy that my sons growth hormone treatments are not waiverable. he started when he was 13 and is still on them. his growth plates are still showing another 1-2 years of growth left. Maybe since your son is off the treatments it wont be an issue. My sons diagnosis was short stature also.
     
  9. kpo

    kpo Member

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    DS was prescribed human growth hormone as a junior in high school due to delayed puberty and short stature. He stopped taking the medication in the first quarter of his senior year. He had reached an appropriate height and had started to develop appropriately by that time. He then received an Army ROTC scholarship, but needed to obtain a waiver after being disqualified due to history of a pituitary disorder. He remained very active both his junior year (while he was still taking the medication) and throughout his senior year (both while taking and after taking the medication) and made the varsity soccer, powerlifting and rugby school. He also passed his APFT test and started to participate in (and thrive) in Army ROTC when he started college this fall. We checked his portal today and were thrilled to learn that his request for a waiver has been approved. We submitted medical records from the endocrinologist that treated him. The office notes confirmed that he had been off the medication since late September of last last year, showed no symptoms and needed no further treatment. Importantly, the records also confirmed that he was free to participate in all activities without restrictions. We also provided a note from his varsity soccer coach regarding his ability to perform the physical demands being of being a varsity soccer player. It was a long process, but it was definitely worth it so that my son fulfill his dream is country as an Army officer. I am sharing his story so that others might be able to pursue their dreams of serving.


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