Hyperhidrosis

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by jmark1616, May 30, 2008.

  1. jmark1616

    jmark1616 Member

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    My daughter is an Air Force ROTC scholarship recipient. She put on her medical questionnaire that she had been treated for hyperhidrosis. (Sweating of the palms and feet) I did not think she should put it on there because I did not think it was relevant. Much to my surprise hyperhidrosis is a disqualifying condition. She got her disqualification letter last Saturday. This condition is cosmetic and has never hindered her from pursuing an activity or interest. She was Athlete of the Year at her school. She has eight varsity letters in the sports of cross country and soccer. No teachers, coaches or JROTC instructors were aware of her condition as it never affected performance. She will automatically be considered for a waiver. What do we do right now? Do we just wait to hear from DoDMERB? I did speak with her dermatologist and he will not write a letter until he knows specifically what it is about this condition that is disqualifying. I think he is looking for DoDMERB to come back and ask some pointed qustions about it. He says writing a blanket statement about it will not help. Maybe we need a second opinion. Any input would be most helpful. I'm at my wits end.
     
  2. RetNavyHM

    RetNavyHM USN (RET)

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    As I've stated before, DoDMERB has to go by the instructions, and they state that hyperhidrosis is a disqualification, thus your daughter was disqualified. Granted there are varying degrees of hyperhidrosis, from a little extra sweat all the way up to where the body is unable to moderate its internal temperature, and depending on the circumstances can actually endanger life.

    Based on what you have stated here, it sounds like this is a mild case of hyperhidrosis, and the possibility of a waiver should be pretty good. The first thing I would do is have your daughter write a letter explaining the severity of her hyperhidrosis, what she uses to control it, as well as the activities she currently participates in, and in what kind of weather conditions, and how the hyperhidrosis affects her, if at all.

    If she can get letters from her coaches that could also help as well. All correspondence should be sent to DoDMERB and they will forward it to the waiver authorities.

    As for the dermatologist, getting copies of all the medical records regarding this, if you haven't submitted them yet, will definitely help. Most likely the waiver authority will not request any additional information, so the best thing the dermatologist could do, would be to write a letter detailing the severity of your daughters hyperhidrosis, and the dermatologists thoughts on your daughter participating in strenuous activities in high heat (think walking in Iraq wearing 60 lbs of body armor, weapons and pack in 120 degree heat). This is what the waiver authority is looking at. If the dermatologist is not willing to write a letter its not that big of a deal as long as your daughter writes a letter and details what activities she is participating in.

    A disqualification is not the end of the world. Waiver are granted every day, and if you take the time to peruse the DoDMERB section here, you will see that many applicants receive waivers. Its an extra step in the DoDMERB process.

    As always, if you have any other questions please feel free to ask away!!
     
  3. jmark1616

    jmark1616 Member

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    Thanks and Another Question

    Thank you so much for your prompt reply. You cleared up a lot of questions that were on my mind.

    I have called her cross country coach to request that she write a letter. We live in the South and the weather can be brutal in the summer. My daughter practiced and practiced well with no complications in 100 degree plus weather. I am also in contact with her JROTC instructor. She attended leadership school in the summer three years in a row with soaring temps and there were no issues. Neither the coach nor the instructor is aware that she even has this condition.

    A few days ago my daughter did send a letter to DoDMERB stating that the hyperhidrosis never affected her at all while she collected eight varsity letters in the demanding sports of cross country and soccer and that the problem is cosmetic. Maybe she should send a follow up letter with the details you described in your previous post.

    At this point, do you think there is there any reason for us to call DoDMERB?
     
  4. RetNavyHM

    RetNavyHM USN (RET)

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    At this point in time there should be no reason to contact DoDMERB. I would call them about a week after you forward all the information to them to ensure it was all forwarded to the waiver authorities.
     
  5. ctims2

    ctims2 New Member

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    I know this thread is pretty old, but I am curious how this ever turned out? I was just selected for the USAF JAG CORPS and did not know the exact same treatment (for cosmetic purposes) would be a disqualifier. I cannot even go to MEPS without the SG Office authorizing me to do so. MEPS can then disqualify me and request a waiver. I was a college athlete and I have literally never had an issue with overheating or becoming dehydrated...
     
  6. Cerberi

    Cerberi Member

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    If you click on the user name - you will see last activity. The last time any of these users logged in was 2008, so you are unlikely to get a response to this particular example
     
  7. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Zombie thread.

    But perhaps someone has more current input for the poster who revived it.
     
  8. Padre101

    Padre101 Parent

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    Can't guarantee it but your chances are good of getting a waiver if your specialties are JAG, MED Corps or Chaplain. Submit all documentations. Have a doctor write you a note.

    You're a lawyer, advocate persuasively and be persistent.
     

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