I know that I am dense.....but need to ask anyway

Discussion in 'Nominations' started by Pasquinel, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. Pasquinel

    Pasquinel Member

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    Scenario A: Congressman submits an unranked nomination slate of 10 candidates to the USNA. Out of the 10, there is one LOA and an additional 3 3XQed candidates.....the other 6 candidates are not 3XQed.

    One Questions:
    (1) will the LOA get charged to the congressman for the USNA (and receive the appointment) and the other 3 3XQed candidates will hope to get either a Senatorial or VP nonination and then hope to get charged to either a Senator or the VP? If the three do not accomplish this with the Senators or the VP, they will not get appointments even though all three were 3XQed?

    Scenario B: Congressman submits an unranked slate of 10 candidates to the USNA. Out of the 10, there are three LOAs.

    Two Questions:
    (1) will one LOA candidate get charged to the Congressman and if so, which one?
    (2) who will the other two LOA candidates get charged to?
     
  2. marciemi

    marciemi USMA Alumnus

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    From how I understand it (and I'm not an expert either but have looked into this a lot with a son with LOA's!), the highest WCS score gets charged to the MOC, regardless of LOA. So in both of your scenarios (assuming unranked slates), if the LOA recipient has the highest WCS score, then yes, they will be charged to the MOC. So in your first example, it would be possible for a non-LOA to get charged to that MOC. In your second example, still possible.

    To answer your next question about where the other ones are charged - this varies by academy. (And I realize you asked specifically about USNA). From what I've heard, those other LOA's can be charged to unused MOC slots from other parts of the country, the National Wait List (seems to be the case more often for WP), or Supe's noms (seems to be the case more often for Navy).

    However, the bottom line is that even if you don't have an LOA and someone else on your (unranked) slate does, then it is still possible for you to be charged to that MOC and/or to get the appointment charged to someone else. Also, keep in mind that depending on the state, many candidates may have a nomination from more than one source, thereby potentially removing them from some of the slates that they are placed on. Really, I don't think anyone can tell you for sure how all this happens except for those in the know at the academy (and I don't think they're here on these boards), plus it may vary from case to case.
     
  3. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    You're not dense. And there is no certain answer to your questions. Assuming the MOC does not give principal noms or rank his noms (both of which complicate the scenarios below greatly) . . .

    On #1, if the LOA candidate has only this one nominating source (no Pres or other MOC), he or she is likely to be charged to that MOC. The other 3Q'ed candidates go into the general pool and (regardless of whether they get another nom) may still get appointments that would be slotted to some other source, such as the SecNav.

    On #2, again, one of the LOA candidates is likely to be charged to that MOC. The other 2 will be charged to another source -- if they received another nom (MOC, Pres), it coud be that. They could be charged to SecNav (most common), the Supe, or the VP. And, if there are other 3Q candidates in the group of 10, they go into the national pool and compete for appointments.

    As noted, if the MOC gives a principal nom or ranks, the above answers may or may not be correct, depending on who gets the principal nom. Note that it need not be an LOA candidate.

    As you can see, it's a very complicated process and one over which the candidate has almost zero control.
     
  4. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    I don't think a candidate can legally receive a USNA nomination from a Member Of Congress other than either of their 2 US Senators or their US Representative from their state of legal residence.
     
  5. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    Unless the MOC names a Principle nominee the candidate with the highest score will charge the MOC with the nomination per US Code. This candidate may or may not be the candidate with the LOA.
    The other 3 candidates don't necessarily need to get another nomination to get an appointment. If they get another MOC nomination they will compete on that slate as well.
    They can still be appointed as a Qualified Alternate. In this case the Nomination is not charged to any MOC.
    There are a number of appointments available to those who received a nomination and are qualified alternates and those who competed for a nomination.

    1. Maybe, maybe not. see the above answer. Competitive slates are chose by merit. The charge goes to the other candidate. The others (including LOA's) will get in as a Qualified Alternate (or National Pool).
    2. Maybe no one.

    Luigi is correct. Federal Law specifically states that a Nominee must reside in the MOC's district.
     
  6. marciemi

    marciemi USMA Alumnus

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    Interesting - I just looked through the West Point Field Force (MALO) training info, and one of the pages that has information for MOC's, says:

    Now you might ask if it is possible for more than one candidate in a Congressional District to get an LOA. The answer is "Yes." In fact, theoretically, it would be possible for all ten candidates whom the MOC nominates to have LOAs, just as it is possible the no candidates qualify. That means that if all of the candidates seeking nomination from that MOC qualify for admissions, they will ALL get admitted. But, the MOC will only be charged for one slot. The other slots may be charged to some other category or MOC. For example, a Representative in North Dakota may not fill all chargeable slots because there are few candidates applying for nomination in that Congressional District. And, perhaps those applying are not qualified.

    I know some of my information may be out of date (some slides are from 2005, others from 2009), but that was what I was going by. I apologize if that is not correct.
     
  7. LSSmith

    LSSmith Member

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    This is all so confusing. I wish I could keep the information straight in my head, but it varies so much.

    We're just going to continue to hope for the best at this point.
     
  8. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    marciemi -
    All the unused slots are indeed open for those who are Qualified Alternates. So, if 20 MOC's have 20 slots open and no candidates to take those slots they will pick 20 candidates with a nomination to fill those slots.
    However, the MOC is not actually *charged* for those slots. They remain open for him to fill the next year.

    LSSMith - it is confusing and really out of your control. Just make yourself the best candidate possible and keep updating your file.
     

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