Increasing Push Up Score

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by ilanag3, Jun 11, 2016.

  1. ilanag3

    ilanag3 Member

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    Hey everyone. I'm entering college in the fall, and although I didn't apply for a scholarship this year I am definitely doing Army ROTC when I get to campus. However, because I didn't really decide that this is what I wanted to do until winter this year, I did not start working on my fitness as soon as I should have. Although I have been working really hard at the gym and running, I'm worried about my pushups. I am a female who was not a athlete in high school (although I was still quite active with horseback riding) so I wasn't starting at a great level of fitness. I am proud to say that I am pretty fit now overall, but as of now I can only do 12 push ups in a row. Although it doesn't seem like alot, this is such a big improvement from only being able to do 1 when I started training. I'm good with sit ups and running, but I'm worried that I won't get to the 19 push ups that I need to pass the test in the fall. Recently I feel like I have plateaued with my number. Do you have any tips for me as I train this summer? Do you think the goal is attainable? Now that school is over I plan on lifting/body weight stuff at the gym 5 days a week and running 3 days.

    Thank you for your help :)
     
  2. Vretro

    Vretro Member

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  3. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    http://www.stewsmith.com/linkpages/serviceacademycfa.htm

    This link is posted so often it almost deserves its own forum. Stew Smith is a USNA grad, former SEAL and former USNA staff officer. He knows what's required and how to prep people. Much good stuff throughout the site.

    I am somewhat (!!!!, ok, way) older than you, a woman, who first started seriously working on my push-ups in the summer before I reported to Navy OCS. That was in the 20th century. I still do them, at least 6 days a week, usually before I eat breakfast, along with the other basics. I can still do the max. The keys are form, breathing, mental focus, and doing them daily - in sequences that build strength, stamina, speed or reps. You want to build machine-like muscle memory that minimizes excess motion and maintains good form. The push-up itself should be the focus, with other exercises and weights designed to be complementary.

    If you have a coach you can go talk to, that could be a resource, or book a session with a pro at a gym or fitness club, targeting your specific goals.

    Keeping a log can help show progress and keep you motivated. There are plenty of phone apps that help motivate and track various activities.

    Don't forget nutrition in all of this. Fuel the machine.

    You can do this. Picture yourself doing it, and doing it easily, do the work a day at a time, and you will do way more than 12. And good for you to go from 0!
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2016
    AROTC-dad and wildcatmom like this.
  4. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Oh - and not necessarily related to push-ups, get one of those hand grip squeezer things. Increasing your grip strength helps with pull-ups; rope obstacles; hauling luggage, duffles, gear; opening stuff; lending a helping hand to others. Your hand will not turn into The Hulk's.
     
  5. Norfolk63

    Norfolk63 privateer

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    Try adding bench press and dips to your routine. Also swim. A lot. Many cadets and midshipmen focus on pushups exclusively and neglect their shoulders and back, making themselves vulnerable to injuries. Check out the excellent YouTube videos from the Navy SEALS/BUD/S physical therapists:

     
  6. ilanag3

    ilanag3 Member

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    Thanks so much for this link! This is exactly the type of thing I was looking for
     
  7. Dckc88

    Dckc88 Member

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    A plateau can also be lack of core strength too. Planks, side planks, dynamic planks, work those into your routine. Chest press surprisingly is not all that helpful by itself, but pulls ups and dips are. I was a personal trainer for 10 years. If I had someone in the military, after any type of chest press, DB chest press, chest flyes, etc., I would have them immediately do push-ups to failure as a super set to the chest exercise. Same with dips and pull-ups, finish off your workout with push-ups to failure. And make sure you are only lifting every other day with added weight, give your body time to repair.

    My daughter is also going in the fall, after plateauing around 25, she started doing the above two or three times a week and daily push-ups and core exercises in between those lift days, now she is up to 48 and climbing.
     

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