Info for high school student

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Rednosis, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Rednosis

    Rednosis Member

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    Hello all! I'm currently a junior in highschool here in Long Island in New York.
    I will obviously be a senior next year, and along the stress of this year is planning for college. I'm very interested in being in the Army ROTC program. I'm also looking forward to studying to become a nurse. Through my research, I've realized that I could become an Army Nurse via the Army ROTC program.

    Perhaps someone could answer the following questions:

    1. Is there a scholarship opportunity for those who want to become am Army nurse?

    2. I've already taken my SAT. Do I also have to take the ACT? And is there another test I need to take to get accepted into the ROTC program?

    3. What GPA range and SAT/ACT range do I need to get a scholarship?

    Well those are my questions for now, I'll ask more when they come into mind. Hopefully someone from the Long Island ROTC battalion sees this thread and gives me input! Other than that I'll be thankful for anyone that replies! Thank you all!
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Take a look here and explore the entire site:
    http://www.goarmy.com/rotc/courses-and-colleges/programs/nursing.html
     
  3. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    I am currently a senior in AROTC as well as a nursing major so I will try and answer your questions.

    1. Yes, there are specific allocations just for nursing scholarships

    2. No, there is no need for the ACT. The only other test you will take before getting a scholarship is a physical fitness test.

    3. I had around a 1300 (M/V) but that was a few years ago and it might be harder now. The minimum is 920 I believe.

    Any other questions just PM me
     
  4. Rednosis

    Rednosis Member

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    Ah! Yes, I've been on the US Army website and several other ROTC related sites for further research. Though I'm probably misunderstanding something. On the US Army website, stated under the "requirements for the ROTC scholarship" it stated that a GPA of at least 2.50 and a SAT score(Math&Reading) of at least 920 is required. To my understandment, scholarship is easy to obtain and it isn't that competitive?

    Right now I have 3.3 GPA and my SAT score, though I'm taking it again, is 1570. What's my shot at this thing? I feel as if I'm not good enough, though I'm relentless and if given input from those who been through experience already, I'll keep at it.
     
  5. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    Scholarships are a lot harder to obtain now but since you are nursing the competition is not nearly as hard. The difficulty for you is actually getting into the school. I can't tell you how many freshman I have seen come in with nursing scholarships then do terrible in pre-reqs and never get into the school of nursing. They either dropped the program or were allowed to switch majors to a line scholarship (I doubt they allow it now).

    To be honest your scores are on the lower end. Pump that GPA up to a 3.5 at least.

    1570? I think you are including writing in your score. The army looks at M/V from what I have seen. Retake the SAT and try to get 1700+ or you could try the ACT and see what happens.
     
  6. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    1. Yes there is a scholarship program for Nursing through the Army.

    2. You do not have to take both the SAT and ACT, it's not a bad idea because some students do better on one or the other, the Army will look at the highes score. The Army also Superscores, so take them more then once and get the highest totals from each test.

    3. This is much harder to answer because the application process is about the Whole Person Score, Academice, Leadership, Athletics. Each of these carry weight in the application. There have been applicants with 3.5 GPA's and 25 ACT that received scholarships because they had very impressive leadership and athletics. There have also been applicants with 3.9 GPA and 30 ACT that did not receive scholarships because of a lack of leadership and athletics.

    The key is to have a very well balanced application, GPA and a high SAT/ACT alone will not get you the scholarship.

    Edit: Adding to this post.

    I agree with Aglahad, the AROTC scholarship is getting extremely competitive, the 3.5 I mention would be where you would want to start, you will also need a min. 1100 SAT M/V or 24 ACT to be competitive at all. You can review this board and see just how few scholarships were awarded this year. The minimums the GoArmy site lists are just that, minimums, I can almost guarantee anyone with those stats would not receive a scholarship.

    To have a better idea of how you look as an applicant you would need to list some of your Leadership, EC's, and Athletics to get a more overall picture of you as an applicant.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  7. Rednosis

    Rednosis Member

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    Yeah, my mistake on that one, I did include writing and yeesh it is an awful score. Also that is my final goal now as I am in my final marking period in my junior grade. I'm gonna haul *** as much as I can and bring everything back to a 90+ average. I'll look into taking the ACT in the fall of my senior year and see how that goes.

    As for the observation of the amount of freshmen that get dropped from their school of choice EVEN after obtaining the nursing scholarship, does that mean I should apply to my school of choice first and see if I get accepted and THEN apply for the ROTC Program?
     
  8. Rednosis

    Rednosis Member

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    What you just mentioned with the "Balanced Application" is very true as that is what most of my teachers and guidance counselor this year are telling me. Well as for a little about my biography:

    I used to play sports, mainly 9th and 10th grade. Football and Track&Field. I can no longer participate that much in sports because I have to babysit my little brother, due to inflicting work schedules of my parents. Though, I've kept my fitness up, but I'll definitely increase my workout progression over the summer to prepare for the physical aspect of ROTC. As for clubs, I've been a member of several clubs in the school.

    Some volunteering I did over the summer, as it relates to my goal of becoming an Army Nurse, I volunteered at a Veterans Hospital. Enjoyed it very much, accumulated 30+ hours so far and I'll be going back this summer.

    Anything else you think that might shed some light into me being a good applicant?

    OH and btw I'm new to the forum so what does "PM" mean? I'm trying to keep up with the acronyms. haha
     
  9. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    PM means Private Message, it means someone sent you a Private Message, if you look at the top right of this page you will see a link to Private Message and it will show how many you have, click on the link and it will take you to the Message page to view the Private Message. You can also click on the posters name and then send them a Private Message as well. Hope that helps.

    The athletics may hurt you a bit.

    Being a member of a club is good but being the president of the club is better.

    Make sure you talk about the work you do for your parents as far as the babysitting, they take work into account.

    An applicant with a well rounded will have a mix of academics, leadership, and athletics.

    Here is a sample of a resume of an applicant that received a 4 year scholarship last year. Things got even more competitive this year and will continue to get even more competitive next year.

    GPA 3.55
    ACT 24
    National Honor Society
    Boy Scouts since 5th Grade
    Eagle Scout

    360 Community Service Hours
    Presidential Service Award
    2 years Debate Team

    School Annual
    1 year Sports Editor
    1 year Editor in Chief

    4 years school Band Program
    4 years Marching Band
    2 years Stage Band

    2 years YMCA Youth in Government (Senator)

    3 Years Youth Court
    1 year Head Juror
    1 year Judge

    Youth Camp Counselor One year

    4 years Cross Country
    3 years Varsity
    Captain Cross Country Team

    3 years Varsity Track and Field
    Captain Track Team

    9th Grade Seniors Baseball

    4 years Youth Group Member
    Senior Leader 11 & 12th Grade
    3 missions trips to Mexico through Youth Group

    Advanced Scuba Diver Certification

    Just remember there are many options to reach your goal, the scholarship is just about the money. You can joinn ROTC as a non scholarship cadet, work hard and continue through the program, graduate, and get your commission. There are other options as well.
     
  10. Rednosis

    Rednosis Member

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    Wow...That's an impressive transcript...Sad to say this but, this guy would've blown me away. I really have some work cut out for me this last marking period and for finals week.

    So say I did choose to continue on as non-scholarship student, do I still receive the monthly stipend for living and material expenses? And also I'm out here in Long Island, New York. So one of the school's I'm looking into is Adelphi University. According to: http://www.hofstra.edu/academics/Colleges/HCLAS/MILSCI/milsci_about.html
    it is under the Hofstra partnership program, with Hofstra being the host school. So does that mean that I am enrolled and study in Adelphi but all ROTC related activities and classes take place in Hofstra?
     
  11. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    As a non scholarship cadet you would not receive the stipend. You would register for the MS classes and begin the freshman year. A non scholarship cadet does not contract untill the junior year, once contracted you would get the monthly stipend.

    Battalions sometimes have scholarship funds available to offer cadets that are doing well and are at the top of the class. During your freshman year if you do well and funds are available there is a possibility you could receive a campus based scholarship. The battalions can give 3 1/2 yr, 3 yr, and 2 yr scholarships if they have them available to give. The key is to have a strong college GPA, a high APFT score and do well in the battalion, do all this and it will better your chances.

    You would need to talk with the battalion at Hofstra to see how they work their program. You are correct you would do your academics at Adelphi University and ROTC at Hofstra. You would have to talk with them to see where you would do your PT in the morning and if you would need to travel to Hofstra for your MS Classes.
     
  12. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Last first. Yes, you enroll in Adelphi and ROTC activities take place at the host school. Frequently, if the school your enrolled in has enough ROTC participants, they will do AM PT at the school your enrolled in and the Military Science classes and weekly Lab are done at the host school.

    If you enroll as a non-scholarship cadet (aka college programmer) you receive no monies until you contract. Most, if not all, programs require you to contract your rising junior year, after which you receive the monthly stipend. How you are accepted as a contracted cadet varies with the branch of service. There are also opportunities to win a scholarship while a college programmer. How this is done also varies with the branch of service.

    Unless your just dying to go to Adelphi, you may want to cast a wider net when looking at colleges, but keep Adelphi on the list as a backup plan if nothing else.
     

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