Inhaler

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Rojo17, Jun 11, 2012.

  1. Rojo17

    Rojo17 Member

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    I have been prescribed an inhaler twice in my life before; once before I was 13 and once this past year, when I was 16. Both times, I developed asthmatic conditions and was prescribed an inhaler as a precaution. What are the chances of me getting disqualified the first time around? I do not have asthma. I only had asthmatic conditions.

    If I do end up getting disqualified, what are the odds of me getting a waiver (yes, I know one cannot say for sure. I'm just asking for rough estimates/personal opinions).

    Thanks for all responses.:thumb:
     
  2. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    It is all going to depend on your specific condition. Why you were prescribed the inhaler, how long and often did you use it, what brought on the condition that you needed it.
    After you complete this medical history form (do this with the help of your parents and/or medical records - you want to get it correct) and physical you will probably have a *remedial*. Probably a questionnaire asking for more detail and possibly a medical test called a Spirometry.

    If you get DQ'd - It possibly can help your case, (it definitely won't hurt) if you put into your own words a letter to dodmerb. Describe to them why you were prescribed the inahler, how often, how long you used it and your current activity level - i.e. are you active in a cardio sport etc.

    Each case is considered on the individual merits of each persons condition. Good Luck!
     
  3. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    If possible, try to get a methacholine test done, if not already. The methacholine test is supposedly the test for determining if someone really has asthma or not.

    I was told by my RC that only competitive candidates that are DQ for possible asthma will get the methacholine test.

    A best case scenario for you is DoDMERB agrees that you only have asthma like symptom so they won't DQ you.

    Not so best case scenario is for DoDMERB to DQ you because asthma like system (i.e. inhaler in your medical record and no methacholine test result) means more than likely you have asthma and you might not get a medical wavier because the SA won't order a methacholine test for you.
     
  4. Rojo17

    Rojo17 Member

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    The thing about taking a Metacholine Test now is if I do end up failing it, wouldn't that all but throw away my chances at being appointed? I'm just worried about failing it now.
     
  5. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    memberLG - it's my understanding that only competitive candidates are considered for a waiver so, I think it's a moot point?

    When my daughter went through this - we were advised NOT to get her the methacholine test.
    For one thing you have to pay for it, or at least put it through your insurance and it's expensive. Also it's not always indicated for every Asthma DQ.
    My daughter was DQ'd for asthma, received waivers from USMA and AROTC and never took the methacholine test. She did take the Spirometry test.
    You also might not be able to convince your physician to order it for you - it's can be dangerous in some people in that it can trigger an asthma attack.
    Also, I am not sure if the methacholine test will prevent a DQ from Dodmerb.

    As with everything - YMMMV and some kids have take it proactively and claim it helped them.

    We on this forum have no idea what your inhaler needs are/were or the organic cause that would lead to their prescription. DODMERB will get to the bottom of it through careful examination of your history, medical records and current states of health.
    Not all "asthma" is Asthma.

    Also be aware - the waiver process will only begin if you are competitive. Back in 2006 USMA would only consider a candidate for a waiver if they were prepared to make an offer. This is confusing and makes candidates seem they are unhealthy when in reality they are not competitive enough to justify the cost of the waiver investigation. You have applied to 4 programs and if you are DQ'd you will be DQ's from all 4. However, you may find that you might get a waiver from one program and not another, or that some programs don't even consider you for a waiver.
     
  6. Rojo17

    Rojo17 Member

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    Thank you for that; it confirms my decision not to take it.

    About the Spirometry Test, is that, like the Metacholine Test, not always indicated?
     
  7. dohdean

    dohdean Member

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    Also, as I've posted on this forum previously -- before you submit to a Methacholine challenge test read up on them on a medical website. When our daughter was required to do this test -- and flunked -- we were told by a well respected pulmonologist (something we confirmed through our own research)that a percentage of people who take the test will flunk -- even if they are not asthmatic -- because they are sensitive to the protein used in the test. At that time (3 years ago) we were told that many civilian pulmonologists do not use the methacholine test to diagnose asthma but rather use it only to determine the severity of asthma once a person has been conclusively diagnosed. Once we knew that our daughter was going to be required to undergo testing (she had been prescribed an inhaler once after the age of 14 for a bad cough -- no asthma diagnosis) -- we paid the money to have a full pulmonary work up done at a nationally recognized pulmonary hospital, which DodMerb accepted. My point is -- the methacholine test can give a false positive. Understand what your son or daughter is being asked to do before they do it -- and have a definite plan if they flunk. They may not be asthmatic and you may have to be proactive to prove that they are not.
     

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