Intelligence Slot??

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by soccermii, Apr 7, 2015.

  1. soccermii

    soccermii Member

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    Hey!! What are the chances of getting an intelligence slot out of the academy? I know that only the top grad gets medical slot, is intel "easy" to get or is it really competitive?? Thanks!!
     
  2. Juvat

    Juvat Member

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    Probably pretty good if you choose not to fly. USAF has a robust intelligence operation with positions avaialble at the squadron level and above. Also you have a much, much better opportunity to go into Intell out of USAFA that out of USNA. Not sure about WP though.
     
  3. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    It looks like there were 51 intel spots for the class of 2015. It stated that there were 453 non-rated spots for the class. Now how far down in the class ranking these spots go... I do not know that answer.

    http://www.usafa.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123431812
     
  4. AVT

    AVT USAFA 2015

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    I was one of those 51 slots.
    It's a pretty popular choice, and I believe it's somewhat competitive. Looking at the list of selectees, I can identify many high caliber cadets.
    I wouldn't think it would be too difficult to get Intel if you were an above average cadet.
    Also, having foreign language skills may help as we were told to list it when filling out our preferences.
     
  5. baileydb

    baileydb Member

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    AVT, can you tell us a little bit about what an intel career would involve? I think it sounds awesome but don't really know much about it.
     
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  6. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Intel is one of the larger career fields, outside of the rated ones. That said, it is fairly sought after as well. So, depending on your classmates' preferences, it may or may not be very competitive. That said, I would guess you would have a decent shot if you were average or slightly above average ranking as a cadet.
     
  7. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Also, whether you you choose Intel or some other career field, don't overlook the possibilities of applying for Grad School after the academy. Approximately 10% of the class generally can get accepted for a grad school slot. And you don't lose your job selection. Example: You could have a job slot for Intel or even being a pilot; get accepted to grad school after the academy, and the air force will hold your job until you graduate from grad school. Some grads like Hornet and my Son, got selected to get their PhD. They both had Pilot slots and the air force held those slots for them until they graduated from grad school. When Hornet was done with grad school, he moved onto pilot training. My son graduates with his PhD this September and his slot is still being held for him. (Caveat: My son did apply and tried out while at Grad School to get a slot as a Special Tactics Officer. He got accepted. So he will turn down his pilot slot and start STO training in the fall after he gets his PhD).

    The point is, I know the OP mentioned only the top grad(s) getting accepted to Medical School. But I wanted others reading to know that no matter what job you get, you can also get a "Grad School" slot directly after the academy and you won't lose the job you received. They'll hold it for you. And it's a lot easier to go from the academy straight to a grad school program and get it out of the way, than waiting a couple years until your regular job starts, you're settled in, possibly married, possibly having kids, and trying to get your Master's or PhD done part time while trying to work full time. Not everyone gets a grad school slot, but if you work hard at the academy, you can be one of the select few. And it won't hurt your job selection.
     
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  8. baileydb

    baileydb Member

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    When I was at Summer Seminar last year, one of the teachers made it seem like grad school was practically a requirement if you wanted to promote to Maj. Is that true? He also said it's often on the Air Force's dime that you go. Is that true?
     
  9. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Pretty much YES. If you want to get promoted, and basically stay in past the 10 year mark, then a graduate degree is pretty much mandatory.

    Now; as far as it being on the "Air Force's Dime", that's a 2 sided question. Except for directly out of the academy, most officers get their master's and/or PhD on their OWN TIME while they're working full time. Occasionally, a few will get selected to go back to school full time; but that's not the majority. The majority do online internet courses or night classes at a local college/university. As for the Military paying for it, there is tuition assistance available; as well as fellowships and other ways to pay for your advanced degree. But I would not say that most times that it's 100% free. But generally speaking, cost isn't usually the problem. "TIME" is usually the problem. Like I said, MOST don't get to stop work for 2-3 years and go back to school full time. Most will work their military job full time, then in between their off time, family time, taking kids to ballet and soccer, etc. they will work on their master's or PhD.

    So, if you can bust your butt at the academy and get selected to go to grad school directly after the academy, you will be so much further ahead of your peers in getting your advanced degree out of the way. But yes, if you want to stay in the military past your commitment, a master's or PhD is pretty much required.
     
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  10. baileydb

    baileydb Member

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    Great to know! Thanks for the info! As always, your post was very informative!
     
  11. Juvat

    Juvat Member

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    While I was still on active duty a Masters was definitely one of those "non-written requirements" to make Major. As such, a lot of young Captains (and even Lieutenants) began working on their Masters degree, ususally though on base University programs. When I boarded for Major, a decision was made to "mask" whether or not the officer held a Masters degree. The philosophy at the time was that Captains should be focused on their job and not on earning an advanced degree. Needless to say, lots of us us that were focused on our job and took the time to get a Masters degree prior to the board weren't too thrilled with that decision (I did my Masters program on Friday nights, 6-10pm and all day Saturday for two years). Not sure what they are doing now with the "masking" of Masters degrees now at the Major's board. Perhaps an active duty officer can elaborate?
     
  12. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    So true Juvat. I retired from active duty 16 years ago. Not only was there masking of grad school, but there was also a difference in Major and "Permanent Major". Not sure if that still exists either.

    The military has definitely changed a few times since we were in using Bows and Arrows and slingshots.
     
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