Is it possible for me to get into West Point?

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by GregMilitary, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. GregMilitary

    GregMilitary Member

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    I am a junior in high school and for 3 years now i strongly consider doing everything in my power to get accepted into the greatest military academy in the world. Overall, i am a 3.8 GPA student and in the SATs, which i haven't taken yet; in 1-10 grading scale, i should get 8.5 in math and some 7.5 in the rest.
    I am trilingual, i know how to speak English, Russian, Armenian, and i am learning Spanish now as the fourth language. In my sophmore year, i successfully found the only Geopolitics Club in our district and am the president of the club for 2 years now. Also, i am a PAC (Principal's Advisory Council) Leader, where i lead and give advice to the incoming freshmen. Aside from my club, i am in the Scholastic Bowl team, Bike Club, Engineering Club and i didn't just sign up in these, i am really into them. I am a member of th CSF (California Scholarship Federation) for 4 semesters now. In the past couple of years, i volunteered more than 100 hours altogether in a school and library. In my lifetime, outside of school i've gone to many sports: swimming, karate, soccer, and tennis. This summer, i go to a gym every day to physically fit. I am interested in chess, physics and military strategy, i take some 3-4 hours a day on these at least.
    At school, people know me as a good leader, but also strict. They don't look at me from the academic and physical point of view. They look at me as "whole" person and different from the rest, most of whom talk about games all the time.
    I want to go to West Point and become an officer in the US Army because for couple of years now i think that's where i see my career and i am ready to make any sacrifices because of my love of this country.
     
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Greatest military academy in the world eh? Didn't know you were applying to the Coast Guard Academy. You said "West Point" in the subject. :confused: :wink:


    How exactly are you strict at school? Sounds like you have a lot going on though, which is good.
     
  3. GregMilitary

    GregMilitary Member

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    .

    Well, i don't know if you're joking, but this is serious for me, but i will answer your question. On a 1-10 scale, I am somewhere at 9. Enough?
     
  4. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    i can't give you an answer to "What are my chances". just like with all military academy applications, the majority of applicants meet the minimum requirements. As long as you meet at least the minimums, then "your chances" are based solely on your "Competition". And we don't know what your competition looks like for your congressional district and state. Do you have good scores? yes. But we've all seen better and seen worse. If there are people in your area applying who are "better", then your chances are harder. If you've got some of the best scores and application in your area, they you have a good chance. See the problem? We don't know your competition, therefor we don't know if you can get into west point or not.

    One suggestion however. Apparently, English is not your primary language. It doesn't matter how you write in a forum, but when you do your application, essays, and other writings for your academy application, make sure you double and triple check your writing before submitting it. Most people who read your application aren't going to research where you were born, how long you've been speaking english, etc... You don't want your application to sound "Lazy". Like you threw it together and didn't proof read it. Interviews are easy. Accents and intonation can determine if english is a 2nd/3rd language. but in written applications, it's hard to tell. Forums don't matter. your application does matter. Best of luck to you. Mike....
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011
  5. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    I don't think I asked that correctly. Maybe it's more of a warning. If your classmates look at you a certain way in high school because they consider you strict, that can allow for a fairly bumpy first year.

    Because of the why I asked that question, you may have thought I was asking about the level of strictness, I was asking in what ways are you "strict". Maybe you mean well disciplined?

    Why do I ask? There are plenty of high school kids who believe themselves a perfect military fit for a service academy. Many of the ones who actually make it quickly find that being "strict" with your classmates does not go over well over a 4 year span.

    I was half-joking, because frankly, your description of yourself displays what some believe an academy is going to be like....it's not. Don't get so tightly spun up that you can't relax...leads to burn out, and many people burn out.
     
  6. GregMilitary

    GregMilitary Member

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    First, thank you that you read all my introductory resume.
    Second, strictness can be considered in many ways. About me: I don't like being tardy, bother other kids, and always try to be correct when i am talking to others. And this leads my teachers to actually like me and separate me from other kids (at least in their minds). This is about discipline. But this doesn't mean i would never get into a fight, no if there is a need i will. Strictness: I found a Geopolitics Club and when anybody disrespects any of the other members, i either try to embarrass them or yell at them. Those who misbehave, i don't count them as a normal person and they actually feel it.Character: I try not to use bad words, and i never like using words like (lol, lmfao, etc).
    Now, if anybody reads the first paragraph and takes it as something telling everything about me, that person will be wrong. This doesn't mean that i think i am the best. No, in my inner circle, i ask questions the most to my friends who academically are more successful than i am, but i also comment the most. So, this pretty portrays who i am. But i also like joking and sometimes do funny things, which i later regret.
     
  7. GregMilitary

    GregMilitary Member

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    Thanks Mike and i will work on what you have told me to. Improve my language skills. I wish all the best in your future
     
  8. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    OK Greg, makes more sense. I read your first "strict" comments as an over-all strictness. What you're describing seems to be more of self-discipline.

    Keep up the hard work and good luck!
     
  9. GregMilitary

    GregMilitary Member

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    Well put, SELF DISCIPLINE
    In reading the lives of great men, I found that the first victory they won was over themselves... self-discipline with all of them came first.
    Harry S. Truman
     
  10. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Self discipline is definitely where it all starts. And becoming a leader is one of the main goals of the service academies. Unfortunately, there are many who want to become leaders, but fail to realize that the first stage to learning to become an effective leader, is to learn to become an effective follower. And this is especially difficult at the academy, when out of a class of 1200+/- cadets, probably 1195 of them are all Type-A personalities. They are all use to being in leadership positions in high school. They are use to being big fish in a small pond.

    Many cadets have quit the academy because they simply couldn't handle becoming a follower. They say that they realized that the academy simply wasn't for them. Some even go on to say they'll still seek a commission via ROTC or OTS. The truth is, many of these individuals have a difficult time with others telling them what to do. The academy and military in general is made up of a rank structure. That simplifies the leader/follower role quite a bit, but many individuals still have an issue with it. They think they are the best leader.

    It's easy when you start a team from scratch and are a leader. In most team events, whether it's a football team, military, entry level employment, etc...; the individual usually needs to start at the bottom and work their way up to leadership positions. This is very difficult for some people to accept.

    So for all those considering the academy and involved in developing your leadership skills, remember that the primary purpose isn't being the LEADER. It's being part of a team. And to be an effective leader, you need to first become an effective follower. And while you might be a leader in one activity in your life, that doesn't mean you'll always be a leader. Sometimes you need to become a follower again. Especially if it's best for the team. When I was still in the air force, I was in the sandbox, and was temporarily assigned to an Army squad. It just so happened that I was the highest ranking person in this squad. However, I knew that these soldiers had more experience than I did. So, I took on the role of follower. I had been a leader many times in my career, but the team and mission has to come first. Even in the active military, an O-1 lieutenant might officially outrank an E-6/7/8/9, but most officers would tell you that at that rank, most O-1's would defer judgement to the recommendation of the E-6/7/8/9. Yes, the ultimate responsibility lies on the shoulders of the O-1, but they realize that the team comes first. A platoon leader in the army, usually a lieutenant, will base their decisions on what their staff sergeant or sergeant first class tells them.

    So remember; in your quest to become a great leader, you have to first become a great follower. And; no matter how high in the food chain you get, and no matter how high of a leader you become; you will ALWAYS still be following someone. Could be a coach, teacher, upper classman, etc... Even a General reports to someone.
     
  11. GregMilitary

    GregMilitary Member

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    The info you've provided from your experience was very helpful. Thank You!
     
  12. Dixieland

    Dixieland Member

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    Mike, that was beautifully put.
     

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