Is it too late for me to join AFROTC?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by WayneNewton2, Jul 24, 2015.

  1. WayneNewton2

    WayneNewton2 New Member

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    I am a rising sophomore in college. What is the latest one can walk on to an AFROTC program? If class starts August 19th have I already missed the ship? Would me calling to inquire be a waste of time at this point?
     
  2. AlphaAlphaSigma

    AlphaAlphaSigma Member

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    You have until the last day of registration at your college or three weeks into the semester whichever is sooner. I would suggest calling your college's detachment ASAP to get you situated.
     
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  3. WannaBeOfficer

    WannaBeOfficer Member

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    Actually, you can prob walk on a little late, depending on where you go. Contact your det now, as most schools have a New Cadet orinetation the first week before classes start. You may be attending a crosstown school, which means you will be travelling to your host AFROTC school for classes. As a rising sophomore, you have two options. One is to go in as a 250, it's a dual program, where you do the first two years of rotc in one. The second option, is to go into rotc as a freshman in the program, and then extend your degree out a year. There are pros and cons to both options. You just have to figure out whats best for you. right now, you need to contact your det, if your school is the host school, go talk to someone there, and sign up for classes! Be prepared to have a challenging and rewarding year!
     
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  4. WayneNewton2

    WayneNewton2 New Member

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    Do you think the first option would be humanly as an EE major already taking 17 credit hours?
     
  5. WannaBeOfficer

    WannaBeOfficer Member

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    Well ROTC is pretty time consuming. There's practices and a lot of studying involved, taking 17 credit hours is a huge load. If you didn't mind pushing your grad date back a year, that might be best. You can free up time to focus on ROTC, and also not hurt your GPA trying to do an tech major at that high of a credit load.
     
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  6. WannaBeOfficer

    WannaBeOfficer Member

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    And going in as a 250 is twice as much work. You have to go to everything that you can sot hat the commanders can see you. Learn what kind of cadet and person you are. As a 250, you go up for FT selection with the 200's they've had two years to work hard and show what they are capable of. I say, if you can swing it, go the 100 route. You'll be more relaxed more focused, and you won't spend the year freaking out and pulling your hair out.
     
  7. WayneNewton2

    WayneNewton2 New Member

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    Thanks a ton, any heads ups or tips you have about the process as a whole?
     
  8. WannaBeOfficer

    WannaBeOfficer Member

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    Well 1st things first you need to decide what route you're going. Figure out who to contact on Monday, and then email/call them, whichever the secretary suggest you do. Once you do that, it's a fairly simple process.
     
  9. AlphaAlphaSigma

    AlphaAlphaSigma Member

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    I would advise against the 100 route in your situation. With an EE degree you can extend your graduation year so that you can take AFROTC 100/200 course this year, 300 course next year, 400 course your senior year and no courses your fifth year. This is called the 700/800 route. Since you get contracted your 300 year this route gets you paid faster than starting as a freshman. Also if you don't get selected for FT this year you can compete for FT the following year and only extend your grad date by a year compared to two. If you were a non-stem major and have a poor GPA I would suggest starting out as a freshman AFROTC but if you are an EE major with good grades I would highly advise starting out as a 250 and if you want extend a year of graduation once you contracted.
     
  10. WannaBeOfficer

    WannaBeOfficer Member

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    He's EE planning on taking 17 credits though, the 250 route will be really hard and difficult, especially since OP may not have time to participate as fully as needed with that kind of course load.
     
  11. AlphaAlphaSigma

    AlphaAlphaSigma Member

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    That's why I suggested go 250 but request to be a 700/800 cadet once he contracts. OP can compete for an EA this year and if he doesn't get one can compete again the following year with just one year tacked onto his graduation plan. If he/she joins as a freshman they will compete for an EA the following year and if they are not selected compete in the next year and potentially extend their graduation plan by two years. I don't really see any benefit to being a 100 as a sophomore (Me used to being one). If one's goal is to earn a bachelors and start a masters before commissioning I would lean towards coming in as a freshman but if one's goal is to become an officer ASAP I would go for the quickest route which is 250.
     
  12. WannaBeOfficer

    WannaBeOfficer Member

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    That is true. I did the 100 route, mostly because I am doing a dual program, so even if I didn't get an EA, I was still going for my masters. I just know that of the many 250's we had, only one made it through, and he ended up getting the boot from FT. But if OP has the grades and the drive, extending out a year and going the 700/800 route won't be so bad. Just I highly advise against taking 17 credits and trying to be in ROTC, that will not end well.
     
  13. WayneNewton2

    WayneNewton2 New Member

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    So it may be best for me to drop a class, and enter as a 250? I'm assuming whomever speaks with me Monday will lay out all the options as well?
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2015
  14. WannaBeOfficer

    WannaBeOfficer Member

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    I wouldn't do more than 12-13 credits. being a 250 is hard work, you're doing two years of learning in one. If your GPA is good, just do 12 or so. You need to be able to get some facetime in at the Det. And volunteer for EVERYTHING that you can. You have to make sure the commander and POC take positive notice of you. Being a ghost cadet as a 250 will most likely earn you a low ranking.
     
  15. AlphaAlphaSigma

    AlphaAlphaSigma Member

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    It would be best to drop a class you can push later for or you can take during a semester break. I don't know how your university has winter or summer classes but a lot of engineering cadets take winter or summer classes either at our university or a local community college so that they can graduate in 4 years and not have 18 credit semesters.
     
  16. Zero

    Zero Member

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    Take a hard look at your situation, 250 is not that much work as far as ROTC courses, but the general "face time" is what is time consuming. Someone above mentioned not being a ghost cadet, which is "not good". But! It is also better to be a ghost cadet that is getting good grades, taking care of himself, and doing what's necessary than the cadet that volunteers for everything and drives himself into his own military careers grave before it even gets started and end up failing classes or dropping the program. Time management is key, take a hard look at your own situation, your goals/aspirations, and how much time YOU can TRUELY commit to ROTC before you make any big decisions. It is also worth taking some time and sitting down with cadre to get their counseling about the matter, many have seen it go good and bad for cadets, most likely in the same degree plan.

    And don't forget like above said you can always do summer classes.
     
  17. WayneNewton2

    WayneNewton2 New Member

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    Alright, tomorrow I will call up my university's detachment. It is 4 hours away from my residence so I can't realistically drive up there in person at the moment. Thank you all for your input and I'll keep you posted on what transpires tomorrow.
     
  18. WayneNewton2

    WayneNewton2 New Member

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    Called, directed me to call tomorrow AM when someone more knowledgeable is in the office. Does joining the program at this point require anything more than registering for the classes (Paperwork, etc) or is that all handled at AFROTC orientation?
     
  19. Zero

    Zero Member

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    That specific Det will tell you what you need to do, it is pretty basic for a walk on.
     
  20. WayneNewton2

    WayneNewton2 New Member

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    So I think I am going to join as a 250. Now I need to figure out how I can tweak my schedule to accommodate the 4 added hours while still staying on pace as an EE. Thanks guys.
     

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