Is this a disqualifying...

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by md403, May 4, 2015.

  1. md403

    md403 Member

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    I was born with a hole in my heart unlike most everyone else mine did not close. Anyways, before I go and start applying for various SA's and have my heart ripped out... does having a corrected" catheter based closure of patent ductus arteriosus disqualify me?? Is it able to be waived? Im just trying to find out know BEFORE I start the process only to be told "NO". I have no problems at all with my heart and have had a recent EKG with no problems. Any insight is greatly appreciated
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I think you need to understand the way the system works.

    DoDMERB is basically the source that processes the medical exams. If the condition is considered disqualifying than it will go to the commissioning source for a waiver.

    You stated various SAs. USMA may decide to waive the condition while USNA and USAFA decide not to waive. SAs and ROTC are considered different commissioning sources, and that means if applying for ROTC scholarships you will also have to go through their (ROTC) waiver process.

    One thing to realize is standards. you mentioned you had an EKG with no problems, but no problems does not equate to military standards. IE this board is littered with candidates that have allergy issues, and for most people that would be no problem, but for the military it can become an issue.

    You know you have this issue. Here is my suggestion, try to find a doc that has military background and have them do the EKG. If you can't than try to find a DoDMERB consultant so you can get in front of this.

    Finally, pm KP2001 and see if they know whether this is a deal breaker.

    JMPO, I would prepare for the worst, but move forward and apply to both the SAs and ROTC. Your heart may be ripped out for a few moments, but when you are 30/40/50 etc you will know that you tried and never wonder that what if? What if I didn't listen to posters and applied, even if there was 0.1 % chance I could have been that 0.1% chance. Don't live with any doubt or what if because that will haunt you much longer than the few months of licking your wounds because they decided your fate.

    Good luck
     
  3. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    The following excerpt from Army Regulation 40-501, Standards of Medical Fitness, p.11-12, appears to be relevant. I'm not a doctor, but I would be encouraged.

    2–18. Heart
    .
    .
    .
    h. Current or history of congenital anomalies of heart and great vessels (746), except for corrected patent ductus arteriosus, do not meet the standard.

    http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r40_501.pdf
     
  4. kaylar

    kaylar Member

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    My DD has a Patent Foramen Ovale. A different hole in the heart that didn't close after birth. We did not even know she had it because it is asymptomatic. So far the AROTC has waived her and we are still waiting to hear from AFROTC (keeping our fingers crossed!!!). The only way to know is TRY!!!
     
  5. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

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    md403 -- here is the link to the DoD medical standard from the DoDMERB webpage that DoDMERB will use to decide "Qualified" or DQ: http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/613003p.pdf Check out page 21.

    I'm not a doctor. Only way to know for sure is to apply.

    If DoDMERB DQ's you -- then the commissioning source medical waiver authority will decide whether to grant a waiver. The Army document you found will most likely be the source the Command Surgeons for Army ROTC Cadet Command or USMA would use to guide their waiver recommendations to the Army Cadet Command Commanding General or the USMA Superintendent.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2015
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Just putting it out there, the OP stated VARIOUS SAs and to me I think it is important what his career goals are for his future.

    It appears that for the Army he is going to have a waiver option. I just think to myself certain color deficiency waivers for the Army or AF rated world is easier than the Navy. Certain color deficiencies are easier for the Navy and Army compared to the AF.

    Let's assume they want to be a SEAL or Ranger, what will be the medical standard for that career field regarding their heart issue? What if he wants to go rated, he can pass DoDMERB, but fail the FAA FC1 required to fly. If he knew that now would he opt to go submariner in the Navy than a missileer in the AF?
    ~Our DS was sent to Wright Pat for a 3 day medical physical when he got his rated slot (FAA FC1). EKG was part of the exam.

    Just saying the DoDMERB in HS is basically a sports physical. 45 minutes, but for some branches and career fields the physical given for their career can be much more in depth. If they fail it, than they can be released or reassigned. Go AF that might mean Intel in Minot ND. Is that going to make you happy? Or would you be happier in Army Intel right off the bat?

    Think about the long run, because at the very least you will owe is 4 years (ROTC) if DoDMERB clears you.
     
  7. md403

    md403 Member

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    Thank you all for various insights. Pima, you make valid points that both of my parents made in reference to various career fields after graduation. I also know that swapping services out of the SA is rare so I do need to consider a lot...
     

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