It's a mad, mad, mad, mad world

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by 11BRAVO, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. 11BRAVO

    11BRAVO Member

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    Medical waiver denied USMA
    Medical waiver granted AROTC

    go figure
     
  2. coffeecup3

    coffeecup3 Member

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    Aww that's not really good :frown:. I'm sorry. But you can still do ROTC :smile:.
     
  3. BOBBY_J

    BOBBY_J Member

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    Hey look at it this way, now your not stuck in this stupid anxious boat the rest of us are in. You actually know completely what your gonna do next year. Besides once you finish AROTC its not about what school you came from, its about doing your job and doing it well. :smile:
     
  4. Chockstock

    Chockstock "Forever One Team"

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    I'm so sorry. Your son must be really disappointed and I hope he keeps his chin up about the whole ordeal. AROTC is still one of the best alternatives to West Point and I hope he's successful there...


    OT: I think this is a serious problem. There's obviously something totally wrong with the system if someone's medical status is considered two opposite things from two different sources. I mean, this is both coming from the Army, right? Unless there's this reason that I'm not aware of, I can't fathom why basically the same people would judge differently. Does ROTC and West Point have different health standards?
     
  5. buff81

    buff81 Moderator

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    Two different waiver authorities. AROTC waiver is granted by Cadet Command. USMA waiver is from West Point specifically the Admissions Committee upon the recommendation of the Surgeon's office.

    Cadet Command is more willing to grant waivers than USMA

    I've had a hard time understanding this completely too. At the end of the day, AROTC and WP cadets both are commissioned into the same Army so you would think that they (both waiver authorities) would be on the same page as far as granting waivers.
     
  6. TheKnight

    TheKnight Class of 2014

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    Part of the difference could be that West Point has a different physical environment than ROTC does. Based on that, the physical disqualification factors are probably different.

    From what I imagine, the waiver authorities aren't considering how your medical history will affect your career in the Army (at least not primarily) but how it will affect the training you receive while becoming an officer. I believe that the training environment is much different than that of ROTC.
     
  7. Chockstock

    Chockstock "Forever One Team"

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    I guess it depends on what the medical problem is under questioning. But like you said, even if the training is different, post-graduate work environment could still be the same. I dont know - it might just be out of my league, but I would imagine that how well the person might perform in his/her job would be a big priority
     
  8. buff81

    buff81 Moderator

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    Not exactly. Yes, they want to make sure that you are able to train and be commissioned but ALSO that you are able to be deployable world-wide when you graduate.
     
  9. riroka

    riroka Member

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    I personally think this experience will make your son work very hard and eventually become a standout in his ROTC unit. Now is the time to move ahead and show the Army what he is made of. Don't ya think Tulane would be the perfect place to do that?? :biggrin:
     
  10. 11BRAVO

    11BRAVO Member

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    My former Bn Cmdr has been in touch throughout this process. He is a '66 USMA grad and Infantry Viet Nam vet. He served 20+ years and retired with the full bird. He told us during his career he saw just as many duds come out of the academy as he did come from other sources. He says it's not the school that makes a great officer, it's the person. This goes back to the philosophical question I heard in every NCO academy..."are leaders born or made?"
    I always got myself in hot water with the cadre because I answered "born" and that is not the answer the army doctrine teaches. But when the lead is flying the true leader will emerge and there is no classroom that can prepare a soldier for that encounter.
     
  11. riroka

    riroka Member

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    I 100% agree with you!!! My husband is a USAFA grad. He recently had a conversation with my son about the type of person you want next to you when u are headed into battle. It doesn't matter what school they attended or what they majored in. It is the whole person that matters and who u know is gonna have your back!

    My son has a boy on his hockey team. Great kid and the team captain. However, he is not the sharpest knife in the drawer. He struggles to maintain a 2.0. He has enlisted in Air Force. The kid is a born leader and I have seen this in him since 3rd grade.
     
  12. 11BRAVO

    11BRAVO Member

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    Chesty Puller enrolled at VMI in 1917. He left school after his first year and enlisted in the Marine Corps to fight in WWI but never saw action. Puller spent almost 40 years in the USMC where he would see action in numerous engagements throughout his career. He retired with a rank of Lieutenant General, was awarded 5 Navy Crosses and is the most decorated Marine in US history.
    In 1965, Puller requested he be reinstated into the Marine Corps in order to see action in the Vietnam War, but the request was denied on the basis of his age. He was 67 years old.
     

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