Job after the academy

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by dani2016, Feb 22, 2010.

  1. dani2016

    dani2016 Member

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    So i would really like to become a marine after (hopefully) attending the academy. I was wondering how the marines are chosen out of the class, or if I sign up for it, or just how that works?

    I was also wondering if it makes a difference whether you go to private school or public school?

    Thanks
     
  2. FeartheGoat

    FeartheGoat Member

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    I'm pretty sure they are chosen.
     
  3. 2012mom?

    2012mom? Member

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    Every graduating senior at USNA turns in a list of their service selection choices in order of their personal preferences (i.e., surface warfare, naval aviation, MC-ground, MC-air, naval flight officer, subs, SEALs, EOD). Actual service assignments to one of those categories are made in the first semester of senior (Firstie) year. The past few years, the announcement of assignments has been made in mid- to late-November, I believe.

    What factors may influence whether an individual gets his/her first choice? Class rank, aka "Overall Order of Merit," (OOM) is a very important factor. A Mid's OOM includes not only their academic class rank (~65% of OOM), but also their physical fitness scores from their PE classes and PRT scores (PRT includes 2 min of pushups, 2 min of situps, and 1.5 mile run, and scoring is much harder than the CFA). The OOM also includes a score for "military aptitude," which is essentially a performance evaluation. If you're first in your class, there's a really good chance that you'll get an assignment that you want. If you're last....not so much.

    There are often other requirements to earn a particular service assignment. There are "screeners" for SEAL wannabees, where SEALs come to USNA for a weekend each semester. They keep the participating Mids...busy. Not sure if there are MC screeners. However, there is a summer training assignment, called "Leatherneck" for Mids who want to go MC.

    In addition, Mids must pass whatever special health standards that are requirements for a given field. One example is the vision requirements for aviation slots. These days, the Navy pays for quite a few 2/C (junior) Mids to get PRK surgery to allow them to meet vision requirements, but a few people have eyes that aren't quite good enough to pass, but they aren't quite bad enough to have the surgery.

    Each year, a certain percentage of the USNA graduating class will be commissioned as 2nd Lts in the USMC. The actual percentage can vary from year to year. Several years ago, the limit was ~16% of the class, but the past year or two, the limit has risen to meet the needs of the USMC. If the number of graduating Mids who put MC as their first choice is below the limit, and they meet any other requirements, they may all get their first choice. However, if there are more Mids than slots, then OOM and performance evaluations from screeners, leatherneck, etc will help to determine who gets the slots. Most, but not all, Firsties end up with assignments in one of their top two choice service areas.
     
  4. marvin7794

    marvin7794 Member

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    Its called service selection. It happens when you are a firstie. It is based on your overall order of merit (class rank). The higher you are, the more likely you get what you want. There used to be ways to game it, but I think they are removing those piece by piece so that the needs of the Navy/MC are more fully satisfied. Those who want spec ops/spec war participate in screeners to prove their worth. Those who want USMC go to Leatherneck or MAGTF to prove their jarheadedness. You also have to get medically screened (color blind, fit in to a plane, bad knees, etc). Thats the cliff notes version.
     
  5. peskemom

    peskemom Member

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    If you ONLY want to go Marines....you have to 'take the risk' that USNA is not your best option. I say this because the ONLY way to 'guarantee' Marine Service Selection upon graduation is to be selected via the Marine-option ROTC. My mid had already gotten this slot, but chose USNA with the goal of Marine 4 years ago. She knew it was a risk, but her decision to attend a Service Academy was something she really wanted to do.

    Just last semester USNA was heavily recruiting their top female Firsties to consider the sub community...since the higher ups are making noises that they need female officers in the queue for this. She called me quite miserable with the thought, since in her words she was 'voluntold' to attend the meeting for this 'pitch' and her heart has been set on going Marine since before she accepted her Appointment. Before Firstie Service Selection night, however, thank God, her Gunny Sgt - who is assigned to oversee the Marine-interested mids - took her aside and with a small wink assured her that he 'had his eye on her' to make sure she'd get USMC. Always feels good when a Gunny has your back! :)

    Quantico is headed her way upon graduation in May, thanks be to God.

    But I would urge you to leave all your options open since you are still so young and really haven't seen all that the military offers with each branch of their service. The great thing about USNA is that during your 4 years you will get to experience planes, subs, ships AND Marines and discover your best 'fit'. Can't do that with the USAFA or USMA.

    Work hard in all areas and like the previous posters said - get your OOM as high as you can and your odds are really good to get your top Service Selection Choice.

    Good luck!
     
  6. navy2010

    navy2010 Member

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    In the hopes of setting the record straight for those with lingering questions about service selection:

    Rest assured the sub community does not want ANYONE that is not interested in them. They consider themselves, rightly so, a premire service community, and want the best of the best.

    That they actively recruit for the best of the best should come as no surprise. The seals do it, the Marines do it, the air community does it, and I am sure there are others that do it as well. As such, there were a good number of male midshipmen that were strongly encouraged to consider subs, and the majority came from the top third of the class. HOWEVER- they COULD [and in many cases DID] select other communities. Which is not to say that SOME did reorder their wish list and move Subs to the top, especially when that "bonus" carrot was dangled in front of them. The ones I know personally [and I know several] quickly climbed aboard, even though their initial steps were a bit tentative. Happy now they are.


    As for the female side of the equation, the brief was an informational meeting for all female mids, as this was a new service option opening up to them. What they were briefed on was the qualifications being sought: first, that candidates be pre-qualified for nuclear [which means nuc-SWO, already narrowing the pool] and secondly, that they were looking to pull from the the top-100 ranks [an even smaller pool amongst the "all" in attendance]. There were "more than enough" that tossed their cover into the ring for the 9 slots available, and many that were turned away as they did not have the OOM to make the cut.

    In ALL cases if the MIDSHIPMAN [emphasis on "man"] made a case for not going SUB, they did not get selected. That is the reality. It did not require a gunney to have one's back. It did require a MidshipMAN to [1] consider the offer, [2] state, in clear terms, as to why the offer was not a good fit, and [3] make clear their reasons for selecting another service community. Those in the end who wanted-out-got-out..... one is headed to medical school as we speak....and another to graduate school.....and some had their arms twisted enough that they said, "what the heck- dolphins- it's all good, and I will get paid most handsomely! Thank you very much!"

    [Just so happens I am scheduled to have dinner with one of the latter down in Annapolis this weekend- now that he is getting paid the big bucks, I will let you know if he offers to pick up the tab!!! LOL! :wink: ]


    Trust that the academy goes out of their way to make your service selection a good fit- for you and for the Navy. Key is doing well so that you have all of the different service communities open to YOU to pick from!

    If it is Marines-or Bust, then you have 2 options: enlist, or put your nose to the grindstone and earn your spot. Same holds true for Air, subs, seals, DOD, and ANY community YOU put first on YOUR wish list!
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2010

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