Jobs after graduation with waiver

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by 1191, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. 1191

    1191 Member

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    I got a waiver for my color deficieny, but I am wondering how much this limits my options after graduation. Because I am color deficient, do I have to go restricted line even with the waiver?
     
  2. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    If you are color blind you will be pretty restricted in what you can do.

    Off the top of my head you won't be able to go SWO, Sub, or aviation probably among others.

    Hopefully someone can give you some better ideas as to what IS available for you.
     
  3. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    If you're colorblind, SWO, Subs, and Aviation (Pilot/NFO) are all off limits. What you CAN do is go into one of the Restricted Line or Staff Corps communities (Intel, Information Warfare, Information Professional, Supply etc.) or Marine Corps Ground, which I think has MOS-specific limitations within.
    One of my old firsties from '09 went IW because of color deficiency. I talk to him now and then and he really enjoys it. Going RL seems like a downer for a lot of people because you don't get to command ships/fly/whatever but there's some neat opportunities there.
    You'll be able to get definitive answers as to the limitations of your color deficiency and what's available to you medically during pre-commissioning physicals 2/C year.
     
  4. Whistle Pig

    Whistle Pig Banned

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    For engineers, Civil Engineering Corps (officer counterpart to Seabees) is also a possibility. As noted, no line positions. Don't ever count on making admiral minus miracle. Conversely, you could become president. That has virtually no prerequisites. :wink:
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    I have some recollection of USNA Admissions saying that, if you're colorblind, upon entrance into USNA you must sign something that states you realize you can only go into certain fields. USMC (non-aviation) is definitely a possibility. There probably are some others. It will be made clear to you up front.
     
  6. 1191

    1191 Member

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    Does the amount of my color deficiency matter? I know for West Point I am not limited at all in my service selection. Thank you all for your quick responses.
     
  7. osdad

    osdad Member

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    EOD is probably off limits too.

    "OK now cut the green wire."

    "Which one's that!" :eek:
     
  8. Whistle Pig

    Whistle Pig Banned

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    "The one in the middle of that bundle. Right next to the yellow one. But cut the sucker.":confused:

    6 - 5 - 4 - 3 ...:eek3:

    :blowup:
     
  9. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    I would seriously doubt they'd let you branch aviation.
     
  10. 1191

    1191 Member

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    I know aviation is out, but I did pass my remidial color blind test. Does this give me anymore options, or are my selections the same as someone completely color blind. I know at West Point I am qualified for anything (besides flying).
     
  11. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    The problem you are going to hit in the Navy is that ships, aircraft, submarines, etc all use red and green lights and objects prominently for navigation. If you are having problems discerning either or both of those colors quickly and accurately from a distance, and in unfavorable conditions (rain, snow, fog, etc), you well may become a hazard to navigation. As I recall, the ultimate determinant re colorblindness is the Falant Lantern test; it is about as simple as it can be, but very definitive. I don't see NAVY flexing very far on this issue; too much would be put at risk.
     
  12. d.mcknight

    d.mcknight Member

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    Just to clarify, if you don't pass the PIP but you do pass the FALANT, you're good to go?
     
  13. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Yes, passing the FALANT means you are NOT color blind.

    Passing FALANT means aviation is available.
     

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